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New Digital Collections Available

October 7th, 2014

The Center for Digital Initiatives launched two new collections this semester: University of Vermont Alumni Publications and Civil War Broadsides and Ephemera.

University of Vermont Alumni Publications

Since 1905, the University of Vermont has regularly published newsletters and magazines for its alumni. The alumni publications are a valuable source of information about the institution and UVM students, faculty, and staff. The publications document activities and accomplishments, curriculum developments, and campus expansion and building construction. They include feature articles on diverse topics, statistical and financial reports, interviews, photographs, and alumni news.

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Civil War Broadsides and Ephemera

The Civil War Broadsides and Ephemera Collection contains items from the Wilbur Collection of Vermontiana that were printed and circulated from 1861 to 1865. Most of the items are related to the war, while a small number are related to Vermont’s efforts to organize and train the state militia after the war. The collection features proclamations, orders and announcements about the state’s military operations, including recruitment, enrollment, supplies, and equipment. It also includes announcements about the progress of the war and President Lincoln’s death. One of the most unusual items is a broadside alerting the public to the theft of U.S. Treasury notes and bonds stolen from a St. Albans, Vermont bank by Confederate raiders in October 1864. Additional items will be added to this collection in the future.

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Exhibit Tour on October 8

September 30th, 2014

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Guided Tour of Geographies: New England Book Work Exhibit
Wednesday, October 8, 2014, 6:30-7:30 pm.
Meet in Special Collections, Bailey/Howe Library

On Wednesday, October 8, 2014 at 6:30, join exhibitors Deborah Howe and Stephanie Wolff for a guided tour of the exhibit Geographies: New England Book Work currently on display at UVM’s Bailey/Howe Library. They will discuss the creation of their own books in the show, methods of construction used by other exhibitors, and contemporary bookbinding and book arts. This exhibition contains a variety of artist books, bindings, and manuscript books on the theme “New England” created by members of the Guild of Book Workers’ New England Chapter.

Deborah Howe is the Collections Conservator and a Book Arts Instructor at Dartmouth College Library, and board member of the Morgan Conservatory in Cleveland, Ohio. Stephanie Wolff is an artist, hand bookbinder, and book conservator. She teaches book arts to students of all ages, including at Dartmouth College Library’s Book Arts Workshop.

The Guild of Book Workers, a national organization founded in 1906, brings together people interested in all the book arts, including bookbinding, book conservation, calligraphy, decorative paper, papermaking, and printing. For more information visit negbw.wordpress.com and www.guildofbookworkers.org.

Free and open to the public. For more information, email uvmsc@uvm.edu or call 656-2138.

Geographies: New England Book Work

September 8th, 2014

Geographies: New England Book Work
September 8-December 12, 2014
Bailey/Howe Library Lobby

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Geographies: New England Book Work presents new bookbinding and artist books by members of the Guild of Book Workers’ New England chapter. Fine and design bindings in leather, paper and cloth, alternative book structures, calligraphic manuscripts, and other works all connect to the show’s theme of “New England” interpreted by the 26 entrants.

The exhibit includes classical regional texts, such as Elizabeth Curran’s binding of Louisa May Alcott’s Little Women and Gerritt VanDerwerker’s binding of the Country of the Pointed Firs by Sarah Orne Jewett. More personal connections to the region appear in Sunsan Bonthron’s Stones, Anna McLain’s Place, and Laurie Whitehill Chong’s Snow Bound in September: A Re-Imagining.

A number of works deal with New England history from a variety of perspectives, including an 1874 copy of the Gazetteer of the State of Massachusetts bound by John Nove, and 28 Fort Square: What Charles Olson wrote on the casings of his apartment in Gloucester, Massachusetts, an artist book by Rutherford Witthus. Nancy Leavitt’s Plant Corridors, Penelope Hall’s Wildflowers around Tufts Pond, and Lindsley Rice’s Some Plants Endemic to New England all explore New England’s natural world. While some books are the traditional representation of the codex form, Bexx Caswell’s Mind Map and Graham Patten’s Call Me Trimtab may give viewers new ideas of what a book might look like.

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The exhibition displays a wide range of work by New England Chapter members, who come from all the New England states and beyond. Entries from Vermont artists include Sweet New England, Stephanie Wolff’s tribute to New England confections such as Necco wafers, Charleston Chew, and maple sugar candy, and Susan Bonthron’s Stones, a poem about a daily walk accompanied by stones in the half-tumbled walls so common in the Vermont landscape.

The Guild of Book Workers, a national organization founded in 1906, brings together people interested in all the book arts, including bookbinding, book conservation, calligraphy, decorative papers, papermaking, and printing. Membership is open to anyone interested in the book: students, master bookbinders, artist bookmakers, calligraphers, printers, librarians, collectors, hobbyists and professionals. The New England Chapter, one of ten regional chapters with 180 members, organizes programs within the region, such as lectures, workshops and exhibitions.

Free and open to the public. There will be a gallery tour on October 8, 2014 at 6:30 pm. For more information, email uvmsc@uvm.edu or call 656-2138.

Printing Update

September 4th, 2014

Printing at Bailey/Howe is now at full capacity. There are four of them on the first floor.

The one near the reference desk is called Ref_BW_Catscratch or bw_catscratch_queue
Another is located behind the stand-up computers leading to the Cafe: is it called Reserve_BW_Catscratch or reserve_catscratch_queue
Two are located in the Cafe: Cafe_BW_Catscratch and Cafe_Color_Catscratch or cafebwcatscratch_queue color_catscratch_queue

If you need or are printing from your laptop, always check the library’s printing page for any updates Printing from laptops at Bailey/Howe. For windows laptops, a new update is available. The print package for Mac’s will be updated tomorrow, Wednesday, Sept. 17, 2014.

The Smithsonian Wants You!

August 21st, 2014

The Smithsonian Institute is looking for crowd-sourced volunteers to help make its online collections accessible via a massive transcription project. Get your nerd on for the public good!

Smithsonian Digital Volunteers who sign up at the projects’ Transcription Center can help decipher handwritten archival collections from bee specimens to field notes from an Arctic journey to a study of Native American vocabularies.

Diary of William Dall

1866 diary of 21 year old Arctic explorer William Dall.

Pamela Henson, a historian at the Smithsonian says, ““These volumes open a window on the past and allow those who lived in the past to speak directly to us today…The Smithsonian has relied on the kindness of strangers to assist with its work since the 1840s, when volunteer weather observers began to send climate data to our Meteorological Project. In some ways we are continuing that tradition.”

New books in Bailey/Howe

August 21st, 2014

These works can be found on our New Book shelf in Bailey/Howe, an ever-rotating sampling of things we’re adding to our collection. You can also review all our newest books online, and subscribe via RSS to receive alerts about acquisitions, by discipline.

The Gay Essay cover

The gay essay by Anthony Friedkin ; [edited by] Julian Cox

“For more than forty years, American photographer Anthony Friedkin (b. 1949), creating full-frame black-and-white images, has documented people, cities, and landscapes primarily in his home state of California. During the culturally tumultuous years of 1969 and 1970, Friedkin made a series of photographs that together offer an eloquent and expressive visual chronicle of the gay communities of Los Angeles and San Francisco at the time. This is the first book to explore the series, titled The Gay Essay, in depth, within the broader historical context that gave rise to it.” –Publishers information

Last Stories and Other Stories cover

Last stories and other stories by William T. Vollmann

“Creatively sourced, boldly imagined, and incandescently written supernatural stories. . .Throughout this ingeniously fabulist, erotic, musing, and satirical treasury, Vollmann gives monstrous and alluring form to the forces that haunt us, from desire and love to regret and loss, as he contemplates with ardor, sorrow, bemusement, and wonder the beauty and terror of life and death and the vast mystery of the hereafter.” –ALA Booklist

Cambrian Ocean World cover

Cambrian ocean world : ancient sea life of North America by John Foster

“This volume, aimed at the general reader, presents life and times of the amazing animals that inhabited Earth more than 500 million years ago. The Cambrian Period was a critical time in Earth’s history. During this immense span of time nearly every modern group of animals appeared…The evidence of this Cambrian ‘explosion’ is preserved in rocks all over the world, including North America, where the seemingly strange animals of the period are preserved in exquisite detail in deposits such as the Burgess Shale in British Columbia. Cambrian Ocean World tells the story of what is, for us, the most important period in our planet’s long history.” –Publisher’s information

Inventing Ethan Allen–Sept. 4 in Special Collections

August 6th, 2014

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Thursday, September 4, 5:30 pm
Special Collections Reading Room
Bailey/Howe Library, University of Vermont

Ethan Allen has legendary status in Vermont and beyond. Historians John Duffy and H. Nicholas Muller III explore the man and the myths about him in their fascinating new book, Inventing Ethan Allen. Join Duffy and Muller on September 4 as they explain how they unraveled a complicated web of memories, myths and history to understand the story of Ethan Allen in the context of Vermont’s history.

John Duffy is emeritus professor of English and the humanities at Johnson State College. He edited Ethan Allen and his Kin (1998) and The Vermont Encyclopedia (2003) and has written many articles on Vermont topics. H. Nicholas Muller III taught history at the University of Vermont, was president of Colby-Sawyer College, director of the Wisconsin Historical Society, and president of the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation. He has published widely on Vermont history.

Find a copy of Inventing Ethan Allen in Bailey/Howe Library on the second floor or in Special Collections. The call number is E207 .A4 D84 2014.

Free and open to the public. For more information, email uvmsc@uvm.edu or call 656-2138.

 

Prospect Fellows Working at Bailey/Howe July 14-18

July 16th, 2014

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The third cohort of Prospect Fellows have gathered at Bailey/Howe this week to study the Prospect Archive of Children’s Work. Their residency is supported by the Prospect School and Center for Education and Research Fund, managed by UVM Special Collections.

The Prospect School in North Bennington, Vermont developed a methodology that allowed teachers to document children’s growth and learning. Prospect sponsored summer institutes, seminars and conferences for teachers who spread the school’s descriptive processes well beyond the North Bennington campus. In 2006, UVM Special Collections received the Prospect Archives as well as funds to support annual fellowships that encourage teachers to continue learning from the Prospect experience.

This year’s Practitioner Fellows include Kerry Elson, a teacher at the Weekday School at New York City’s  Riverside Church; Felicia Black, a professor at LIU Brooklyn; Caitlin Preston, a first and second grade teacher at the Central Park East 1 School in East Harlem, New York; and Tasnim Azad and Ashley Leone, who both teach at the Children’s Learning Center at Morningside Heights in New York. Mentors Ellen Schwartz and Peg Howes have worked with the Prospect School and Center since the early 1980s.

Erin Whitney received the 2014 Prospect Research Fellowship. Whitney is an educator and a doctoral student at the University of Pennsylvania. She is using the Prospect Archive of Children’s Work to explore the ways that Prospect practitioners looked at the different kinds of works that children created to understand their learning and identities.

Learn more about Prospect and the Descriptive Processes

Prospect Research and Practitioner Fellowships

Prospect School and Center for Research and Education Archives

Prospect Archive of Children’s Work–Online

Jenny’s Story: Taking the Long View of the Child, Prospect’s Philosophy in Action (2010)
LB1115 .C278 2010 (B/H 3rd floor)

Starting Strong: A Different Look at Children, Schools, and Standards (2001)
LB1117 .C28 2001 (B/H 3rd floor)

From Another Angle: Children’s Strengths and School Standards, The Prospect Center’s Descriptive Review of the Child
LB1117 .F735 2000 (B/H 3rd floor)

Warren R. Austin Papers

May 14th, 2014

The Warren R. Austin Papers in Special Collections document the distinguished career of Vermont lawyer and statesman Warren Austin. They also provide insights into many of the important national and international events and issues of the mid-twentieth century.

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After graduating from Bakersfield Academy and the University of Vermont (class of 1899), Austin read law and was admitted to the Vermont bar in 1902. Except for a four-year stint in China with American International Corporation in 1916-1917, Austin practiced law in Vermont until 1931. After the death of Senator Frank L. Greene, Austin was appointed to the U.S. Senate, where he served until 1946. In 1946, President Truman appointed Austin as the first U. S. representative to the United Nations, a post he held until 1953. Austin, a Republican, was staunchly conservative on domestic issues and opposed the New Deal. His time in China led him to support American involvement in international affairs rather than adopt the isolationist position of his Republican colleagues.

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The United States News included a feature on the “nonisolationist Republican” senator from Vermont in February, 1941.

Austin’s papers came to UVM after his death in 1962. The boxes fill over 100 feet of shelf space, and include letters, memos of meetings and conversations, documents, speeches, manuscripts of writings, legislative bills and drafts, newspaper clippings, and photographs. The material covers some important work from his law career, such as the 1925-1927 settlement of the Vermont-New Hampshire Boundary. The papers are an especially rich resource for international issues that Austin worked on in the Senate and the UN, including the Bretton Woods proposals, the Dumbarton Oaks conference, the Committee of One Million, the United Nations, the Inter-American conference at Chapultepec, the Korean conflict, the Lend Lease bill, the Mackinac conference, NATO, Palestine, the Rio de Janeiro conference, and United World Federalists.

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Find this book in Special Collections.

A collection inventory is available online. Some documents from the Austin Papers are included in the Congressional Papers and Letters Home from Congress collections in the Center for Digital Initiatives.

Exhibit: Working the Landscape

April 25th, 2014

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Working the Landscape: Vermont’s Fields, Trails & Forests
Exhibit Cases, Bailey/Howe Library Lobby, May 1-August 20, 2014

Vermont landscapes are the outcome of natural processes and human work. While often imagined as an unchanging iconic place, Vermont’s landscapes are the result of diverse and on-going activities. This exhibit focuses on the tools, machines, and practices that have shaped Vermont’s fields, forests and recreational spaces. The exhibit also draws attention to the policies that have influenced how people work the land. Woven through the exhibit are the voices of Vermonters who reflect on what they value most about the state’s working landscape.

“Working the Landscape” is the outcome of a service-learning project for the Bailey/Howe Library conducted by masters students enrolled in UVM’s Food Systems Graduate Program. The students applied their disciplinary perspectives from the fields of anthropology, community development, geography, communications, sociology, food security, animal science, and network analysis in the research for this capstone project.

The students also created an online version of the exhibit.

Free and open to the public. For more information, email uvmsc@uvm.edu or call 656-1493.

Painting: Hay Bales in June, Anna Ayres