Hours Today: 09/02/14
8 am - Midnight | see all hours

Ask a Librarian

Posts Tagged ‘primary sources’

Get the Local Scoop

Tuesday, April 12th, 2011

bfp

The UVM Libraries has an extensive collection of local and regional newspapers in  print, microfilm, and electronic editions.

Our collection includes historical newspapers as well as current titles.

These papers can help you get the local perspective on all kinds of current and historic research. Use them to find information on local businesses, UVM and other colleges in the area, environmental regulations, elections, local response to national and international events, and more.

Current Titles Include

The Burlington Free Press - current day’s paper is in the McCrorey Gallery and older issues dating back to 1827 are on microfilm (2nd floor).
Online version covers 2002 to the current day.

The Times – Argus (Montpelier) – current day’s paper is in the McCrorey Gallery and older issues dating back to 1985 are on microfilm (2nd floor).

The Rutland Herald – current day’s paper is in the McCrorey Gallery and older issues dating back to the early 19th century are on microfilm (2nd floor) and in Special Collections (ground floor).

Additionally, Special Collections receives numerous small weekly papers such as The Williston Observer, The Essex Reporter, and The Shelburne News in their print versions.

Fifty-three different Vermont newspapers variously covering dates from 1783-1922 are included in the full-text database America’s Historical Newspapers (Vermont Title list).

Thanks to the Vermont Digital Newspaper Project, many more Vermont newspapers dating from 1836-1922 will soon be available online.

For more assistance with this collection Ask a Librarian.

Fleming + CDI Digitize Images of Japan

Wednesday, February 16th, 2011

A Tourist’s Album of Japan

Katherine Wolcott and her uncle, Robert Hull Fleming, compiled this photo album on their visit to Japan in 1909. It contains nearly 40 leaves of collected photographs and postcards, numbering two to three per album page. The pictures range in content, some depicting staged photos of daily life while others portray landscapes and countryside. The album itself measures approximately 11 x 14 x 4 inches. Users can view the entire album, or individual images.

A Collaboration

This collection represents a collaboration between the university’s Robert Hull Fleming Museum, where the album is housed, and the UVM Libraries’ Center for Digital Initiatives. Conceived of as part of the Museum’s Shadows of the Samurai: Japanese Warrior Traditions exhibit, this new online resource invites many perspectives on early twentieth century Japan.

Japan in Context

Wolcott’s album captures a unique view of Japan at the brink of burgeoning Western influence. After defeating the Russians in the Russo Japanese War (1904-05), Japan began to cement itself as a global power, and its efforts to modernize began to attract Westerners. The images in this album depict a Japan with a strong national heritage and cultural appreciation as well as a newfound embrace of modernization and technology.Most of the pictures in the album sold commercially as a form of postcard. In the early 1900s, the Japanese populace began consuming millions of these types of commercially produced picture postcards. Eventually, the medium became so popular that it started to replace the more traditional wood block print. The citizenry sought pictures of their budding nation, wanting to hold a still image of the rapidly modernizing and changing countryside.

Children’s Art & Writing Collection

Friday, February 11th, 2011

Prospect Archive of Children’s Work

The Prospect Archive of Children’s Work collection  offers a longitudinal look at the art and writing of nine children, as well as teacher records and information on the unique Prospect School and Center.

About Prospect

The Prospect School (1965-1991), deeply influenced by the philosophy of John Dewey, and in particular his commitment to the agency for the learner and his conviction that the desire for learning is inherent in every person, enrolled children from all walks of life, from age 4 through 14, with tuition waived or adjusted according to need.

The Prospect Center (1979-2010), under the leadership of co-founder Patricia Carini, developed a disciplined, collaborative method for understanding children as thinkers and learners called the descriptive review of the child. The descriptive review is a mode of inquiry that draws on the rich, detailed knowledge teachers and parents have of children and on their ability to describe those children in full and balanced ways, so that they become visible as complex persons with particular strengths, interests, and capacities.

Porter Thayer Photos Online

Friday, December 10th, 2010

This collection is being digitized through a collaboration between the UVM Libraries’ Center for Digital Initiatives and the Brooks Memorial Library.  The collection launched with 100 initial photos in December 2010, after which batches of 50 images will be added to the collection on a continuous basis.  This work is supported in part by a grant from the Windham Foundation.

When completed, the collection will contain 1300 photographs of Windham County made from silver gelatin prints by this early 20th century itinerant town photographer. The prints were made in 1980 from the 5×7 glass plates negatives held at the Brooks Memorial Library in Brattleboro, Vermont.

“During the time period Porter worked, Vermont was extremely poor and rural, yet held a close-knit population that shared the labors of life. Farmers helped one another to survive in a subsistence and barter economy. For women, men, and children, life meant constant work. Thayer’s images describe the work and the tools involved. His landscape images reveal this working landscape, which today is mostly hidden by trees.” (by Jessica Weitz and Forrest Holzapfel)

Read more about this collection in a recent article from The Commons News.

Tommy DeFrantz Discusses Kake Walk

Tuesday, September 21st, 2010

Kake Walks and Dance Competitions: Race and Performance in American Popular Culture

Monday, October 4, 2010
7:00 PM – Royall Tyler Theatre

Dr. Thomas DeFrantz

Former Alvin Ailey dancer and MIT Professor of Music, Theater Arts, Comparative Media Studies, and Women’s and Gender Studies Dr. Thomas DeFrantz will situate UVM’s Kake Walk in the broader context of American performance history. His most recent book is titled //Dancing Many Drums: Excavations in African American Dance and Dancing//. His most recent creative works include /Queer Theory! An Academic Travesty/ commissioned by the Theater Offensive of Boston and the Flynn Center for the Arts & “CANE,” an immersive environment dance theater experience that explores black sharecropping after the Civil War. He created historical choreography, including a Juba Dance, for the second iteration of the New York History Workshop’s award-winning exhibition /Slavery in New York/ on display at the New York Historical Foundation since 2007.

Part of the launch announcing Kake Walk at UVM, the newest digital collection from the Center for Digital Initiatives.

UVM’s Kake Walk, a synchronized dance competition during the annual Winter Carnival, featured fraternity brothers in blackface and kinky wigs high-stepping to the tune “Cotton Babes.” The event, abolished in 1969, occupies a controversial position in the university’s institutional memory; it is, for some, a hallowed tradition and for others, overt racism.

To read more about student contributions to the digital collection, see this recent story in UVM Today.

Bamboozled, Kake Walk, & Blackface

Wednesday, September 1st, 2010

BAMBOOZLED the movie

KAKE WALK the tradition

BLACKFACE the issue

Join us as we examine blackface and UVM’s once popular minstrel tradition Kake Walk through a film screening of Spike Lee’s Bamboozled. A pre-screening presentation will include a brief history of Kake Walk, an exploration of racist visual vocabulary, and a look at the resurgence of these themes. A discussion will follow the film.

7:00 PM – THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2010 – Lafayette 108

Organized by the Center for Digital Initiatives, the Fleming Museum, and the Center for Cultural Pluralism. The CDI’s forthcoming collection Kake Walk at UVM will featured digitized archival material, and will launch on September 16th.

Libraries Receive Grant to Digitize Vermont’s Historic Newspapers

Wednesday, July 14th, 2010

The University of Vermont of Vermont Libraries has been awarded funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) in the amount $391,552 to support the Vermont Digital Newspaper Project.

The UVM Libraries will work collaboratively with partners in the Vermont Department of Libraries, the Ilsley Public Library of Middlebury, and the Vermont Historical Society to select, digitize, and make available up to 100,000 pages of Vermont newspapers, published between 1836 and 1922, from the collections of the Vermont Department of Libraries and the University of Vermont. The digitized newspapers will be made freely available to the public via the Library of Congress’ Chronicling America database.

The project builds upon work of the NEH-funded Vermont Newspaper Project which, from 1997 to 2001, identified, cataloged and microfilmed close to 1,000 historical Vermont newspaper titles in over 3,000 libraries, historical societies, and other repositories throughout the state.

By 1830, many towns in Vermont had their own local newspapers. Examples include Brandon’s Vermont Telegraph, a reform newspaper that supported women’s rights, temperance, vegetarianism, anti-slavery, and the abolishment of capital punishment, and Woodstock’s Working Man’s Gazette, a voice for farmers, mechanics, and artisans in the 1830’s.

The Vermont Digital Newspaper Project will provide a window into Vermont’s participation in key moments in American history, such as abolition of slavery, the Civil War, westward expansion, the influenza pandemic, and the First World War.

Project partners talk about the immeasurable impact digital access to these materials will provide for researchers.

Project Director Birdie MacLennan, of the UVM Libraries says, “This will go a long way in dissolving information barriers by offering an important link to Vermont history, for scholars, researchers, historians, genealogists and the general public. It’s a dream come true for users, who have been asking us for years when Vermont newspaper content will be made available online. We are pleased to now be able to say: Coming soon, to a computer near you!”

“We’re really thrilled to be partnering with UVM and others,” says State Librarian Martha Reid. “The Vermont Newspaper collection is one of the state library’s most widely used. It will wonderful to have it freely available to the world. Particularly to Vermonters who are doing local history or family research, this will be an invaluable resource.”

Chris Kirby, of the Ilsley Public Library says, “We have lots of patrons who come in doing genealogical research and this will greatly enhance their abilities. They’ll be able to search ancestors by last name and call up any stories about them.”

Vermont Historical Society Librarian Paul Carnahan says, “It will have a tremendous impact on local history research in Vermont. A lot of research boils down to information found in newspapers and until now there has been no easy way to get at it except sitting in a dark room with microfilm and winding your way through reels one at a time. It will be like day and night.”

UVM’s Medieval and Renaissance Manuscripts Online

Wednesday, June 30th, 2010

The Center for Digital Initiatives has comprehensively digitized all of the libraries’ medieval and renaissance manuscripts.

This collection was created with the help of Travis Puller, curator of the library’s 2009 exhibit Medieval and Renaissance Manuscripts: Witnesses from Our Written Past.

Based on Puller’s previous work, we scanned and described 21 loose manuscripts and 10 bound items created across Europe and the Middle East and dating from the 12th to 17th centuries CE.

Our collection includes lavish books of hours, three works of Cicero bound into a single volume sometime in the early 1400s, several Koran leaves, and a distinctive Italian herbal featuring whimsical, anthropromorphic illustrations of plants.

Raul Hilberg Profiled in ‘The Nation’

Tuesday, April 20th, 2010

Raul Hilberg, the late professor emeritus of political science and author of the masterwork 1961 book The Destruction of the European Jews, was profiled this month on TheNation.com.

Drawing on documents of Hilberg’s gifted to the UVM Libraries upon his death, the article, “A Conscious Pariah: On Raul Hilberg,” reveals his complex and scholarly antagonistic relationship with Hannah Arendt, political theorist and author of Eichmann in Jerusalem, a book about the man responsible for implementing the Final Solution.

“As Hilberg read Arendt’s articles about Eichmann, he noticed a number of striking similarities to his own research (published in his book two years previously),” the article recounts. “He tallied them on an accounting spreadsheet stored in the accordion folder with the New Yorker issues (where Arendt’s writing on Eichmann was serialized). At the bottom of the spreadsheet he divided the instances into “cert.” and “prob.” and penciled hash marks next to each category.”

While Hilberg was vocally critical about the work of several Holocaust historians, “no one who wrote about the Holocaust nettled Hilberg more than Hannah Arendt,” the article notes. It goes on to reveal the deep contributions Hilberg made to his field, and the ways in which much of his work from The Destruction of the European Jews permeates Arendt’s writing.

Read the profile in full on TheNation.com.

Release Date: 04-14-2010
Author: Amanda Kenyon Waite
Email: Amanda.Waite@uvm.edu
Phone: 802/656-8381 Fax: (802) 656-3203

Maple Madness: A Week of Celebration

Tuesday, March 16th, 2010

Maple Madness: A Week of Celebration at the UVM Libraries

The University of Vermont Libraries are celebrating the creation of a new Maple Syrup Research Website with a week of programs, exhibits, and food, beginning March 28th, 2010. The website is a comprehensive subject guide in the field of maple syrup, including historical publications and photographs related to maple syrup research at the University of Vermont.

Cook Maple, Win Prizes

A Maple Cook-Off will be held at UVM’s Davis Center on March 28th, from 4 to 6PM, featuring a buffet of maple delicacies, music by acoustic trio The Growlers, maple displays, children’s activities, and prizes of gift certificates to local eateries (awarded by food critics, activists, and producers). The event is free and open to the public. Register now! Get more information.

A Party in the Woods

John Elder, a Professor at Middlebury College, will present “A Party in the Woods: Sugaring, Community, and Celebration Under a Changing Sky,” on maple sugaring as a traditional rural lifeway that both illuminates contemporary challenges like climate change and exemplifies the need for celebration within environmental thinking today. The talk will take place in Bailey/Howe Library’s Special Collections on March 31st, at 5:30 PM, and is co-sponsored by Special Collections and the UVM Libraries.

Elder’s talk will follow a 4:30 PM reception to celebrate the launch of the Maple Syrup Research Website in the Bailey/Howe Library lobby.

Maple Exhibits

Maple exhibits in the Bailey/Howe Library include images of sugaring-off parties, historic recipes, the story of Helen Nearing, and much, much more. The exhibits are located in the Bailey/Howe Library Lobby and in Special Collections. They will be on display through June 2010.

For more information, please call 802-656-9980 or e-mail selene.colburn@uvm.edu.

Homemade Maple Syrup by Chiot’s Run, used in accordance with Creative Commons.