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Posts Tagged ‘politics’

New Book Highlights

Wednesday, January 19th, 2011

God in the details : American religion in popular culture edited by Eric Michael Mazur and Kate McCarthy, 2nd ed.

“Exploring the blurred boundary between religion and pop culture, God in the Details offers a provocative look at the breadth and persistence of religious themes in the American consciousness. This new edition reflects the explosion of online activity since the first edition, including chapters on the spiritual implications of social networking sites, and the hazy line between real and virtual religious life in the online community Second Life. Also new to this edition are chapters on the migration of black male expression from churches to athletic stadiums, new configurations of the sacred and the commercial, and post 9/11 spirituality and religious redemption through an analysis of vampire drama, True Blood. Popular chapters on media, sports, and other pop culture experiences have been revised and updated, making this an invaluable resource for students and scholars alike.” –Publisher’s information

The hungry world : America’s Cold War battle against poverty in Asia by Nick Cullather

“A pioneering and transformative work that tracks the politics of hunger from the invention of the calorie to Asia’s Cold War ideological battlegrounds, The Hungry World explores, with a sharp, lively sense of irony, American scientists’ and policy-makers’ relentless and often futile efforts to transmute the conflictual politics of rural deprivation into a technocratic politics of agricultural production.” –Paul A. Kramer, author of The Blood of Government: Race, Empire, the United States and the Philippines

Daniel by Henning Mankell ; translated from the Swedish by Steven T. Murray

“Set in the 1870s, this earnest and heartbreaking story opens with the unsolved murder of a mentally retarded Swedish girl, but this isn’t a mystery in the mode of Mankell’s international bestselling Kurt Wallander novels (Firewall, etc.). Hans Bengler, a Swedish entomologist, travels across southern Africa in search of undiscovered insects. In the desert, he finds an orphaned native boy, whom he adopts on impulse and calls Daniel. Bengler brings Daniel back to Sweden to exhibit him for money. A link eventually emerges between the girl’s murder and Daniel’s story, which dramatically illuminates the evils of colonialism (Bengler notes that he “had to make the important decisions for these black people”) and the cultural chasm between Europeans and Africans. Mankell fully understands Daniel’s radically different cultural perspective and indelibly captures the boy’s longing to return to his homeland and the tragic consequences of his forced exile.” –Publisher’s Weekly

Sheila Hicks : 50 years by Joan Simon and Susan C. Faxon ; with an essay by Whitney Chadwick

“Sheila Hicks (born 1934) is a pioneering artist noted for objects and public commissions whose structures are built of color and fiber. This volume accompanies the first major retrospective of Hicks’s work; it documents the remarkable versatility and dramatically divergent scale of her textiles as well as her distinctive use, and surprising range, of materials. Hicks deliberately and provocatively engages what are often considered mutually exclusive domains, rethinking and pushing the limits of generally accepted contexts, conditions, and frameworks. These include distinct objects and temporal, performative actions; studio works and commissions for public buildings; and textiles made in artisanal workshops as well as for industrial production in places as different as Chile, France, Germany, India, Japan, Mexico, Morocco, Sweden, and the United States.” –Publisher’s information

New Book Highlights

Tuesday, September 14th, 2010

Ain’t nothing like the real thing : how the Apollo Theater shaped American entertainment edited by Richard Carlin and Kinshasha Holman Conwill

“The Apollo Theater has provided a stage for performers and a setting for the creativity of black American music that has hugely influenced American music in general. Recognizing the seventy-fifth anniversary of the Apollo Theater, this book offers essays by entertainment historians, critics, and journalists chronicling the legacy of the storied theater.” -Booklist

How to grow a school garden : a complete guide for parents and teachers by Arden Bucklin-Sporer and Rachel Kathleen Pringle

“In this groundbreaking resource, two school garden pioneers offer parents, teachers, and school administrators everything they need to know to build school gardens and to develop the programs that support them.” –Publisher’s information

Sayyid Qutb and the origins of radical Islamism by John Calvert

“Sayyid Qutb (1906-1966) was an influential Egyptian ideologue who established the theoretical basis for radical Islamism in the postcolonial Sunni Muslim world. Lacking a pure understanding of the leader’s life and work, the popular media has conflated Qutb’s moral purpose with the aims of Osama bin Laden and al-Qaeda. He is often portrayed as a terrorist, Islamo-Fascist, and advocate of murder. An expert on social protest and political resistance, John Calvert rescues Qutb from misrepresentation and follows the evolution of his thought within the context of his time.” –Publisher’s information

Three sisters by Bi Feiyu ; translated from the Chinese by Howard Goldblatt and Sylvia Li-chun Lin

“In a small village in China, the Wang family has produced seven sisters in its quest to have a boy; three of the sisters emerge as the lead characters in this remarkable novel. From the small-town treachery of the village to the slogans of the Cultural Revolution to the harried pace of city life, Bi Feiyu follows the women as they strive to change the course of their destinies and battle against an “infinite ocean of people” in a China that does not truly belong to them. Yumi will use her dignity, Yuxiu her powers of seduction, and Yuyang her ambition—all in an effort to take control of their world, their bodies, and their lives.” –Publisher’s information

New Book Highlights

Monday, January 4th, 2010

Pakistan book cover

Pakistan : eye of the storm (3rd ed.) by Owen Bennett Jones

“This thoroughly revised and updated edition of Bennett Jones’ market-leading account of this critical modern state includes fresh material on the Taliban insurgency, the Musharraf years, the return and subsequent assassination of Benazir Bhutto, and the unlikely election as president of Asif Ali Zardari.” –Publisher’s information

I'm a Lebowski book cover

I’m a Lebowski, you’re a Lebowski : life, The big Lebowski, and what have you by Bill Green … [et al.] ; foreword by Jeff Bridges.

I’m a Lebowski, You’re a Lebowski is a treasure trove of trivia and commentary, hilarious throughout and illustrated with photos from the film, including dozens taken on the set by Jeff Bridges. It includes interviews with virtually every major and minor cast member including John Goodman, Julianne Moore and John Turturro, as well as the real-life individuals who served as inspiration for the characters such as Jeff Dowd and John Milius.” –Publisher’s information

Children of Marx book cover

Children of Marx and Coca-Cola : Chinese avant-garde art and independent cinema by Xiaoping Lin

“Informed by the author’s experience in Beijing and New York–global cities with extensive access to an emergent transnational Chinese visual culture–this work situates selected artworks and films in the context of Chinese nationalism and post-socialism and against the background of the capitalist globalization that has so radically affected contemporary China.” –Publisher’s information

Beyond Ideology book cover

Beyond ideology : politics, principles, and partisanship in the U.S. Senate by Frances E. Lee

“The congressional agenda, Frances Lee contends, includes many issues about which liberals and conservatives generally agree. Even over these matters, though, Democratic and Republican senators tend to fight with each other. What explains this discord? Beyond Ideology argues that many partisan battles are rooted in competition for power rather than disagreement over the rightful role of government.” –Publisher’s information

SourceOECD: A Focus on Global Issues

Friday, November 13th, 2009

Big Blue Marble


A great online source on economics and social issues worldwide, that can be used by students and scholars working in a broad range of disciplines, including economics, business, social sciences, development, statistics, environmental science and studies, education, agriculture, and politics.

SourceOECD provides access to the publications of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), an international governmental organization (IGO) with 30 member countries sharing a commitment to democratic government and the market economy. With active relationships with some 70 other countries, NGOs and civil society, it has a global reach.

Publications can be accessed by theme in the advanced search mode.

Sample books on energy include Act Locally, Trade Globally: Emissions Trading for Climate Policy, Biofuels for Transport: An International Perspective, and World Energy Outlook 2009.

Data sets can be downloaded into Microsoft Excel.

Want tips on how to use SourceOECD?

Check out the Emory University Libraries “A (Relatively) Quick Guide to Using SourceOECD” or Ask a Librarian at UVM for help.

See also: Official SourceOECD user guide.

“The Blue Marble,” a public domain NASA photograph was taken in 1972 from Apollo 17. It was accessed via NASA’a Visible Earth website.

Your Weekly Guide to Congress

Wednesday, November 4th, 2009

Senate Entry

The UVM Libraries now provide electronic access to CQ Weekly, from 1983 onward. CQ Weekly is an independent publication that provides objective, non-partisan reporting and analysis of Congressional activities, on a week-by-week basis. It will prove useful to students of political science, public policy, and history.

A recent issue included articles on health care legislation and debates, such as “Health Care: A Matter of Mandates,” “Highlights of the House Health Care Bill,” and “Health Care Polls: The Question Helps Define the Answer.”

Useful charts and graphics summarize recent votes, appropriations, and upcoming bills, making it easy to track on issues, and to see how the President’s agenda is faring. Articles are searchable a variety of ways, including by topic, committee, or bill number. Floor votes dating back to 1983 can be easily retrieved.

Print volumes of CQ Weekly from 1975-2008 are available in Bailey/Howe Books (JK1 .C15), and 2009 volumes can be found in the Reference Collection. Microfilm at the Library Research Annex dates from 1953-1988.

Senate Entry by deltaMike, used in accordance with Creative Commons.