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UVM’s Medieval and Renaissance Manuscripts Online

Wednesday, June 30th, 2010

The Center for Digital Initiatives has comprehensively digitized all of the libraries’ medieval and renaissance manuscripts.

This collection was created with the help of Travis Puller, curator of the library’s 2009 exhibit Medieval and Renaissance Manuscripts: Witnesses from Our Written Past.

Based on Puller’s previous work, we scanned and described 21 loose manuscripts and 10 bound items created across Europe and the Middle East and dating from the 12th to 17th centuries CE.

Our collection includes lavish books of hours, three works of Cicero bound into a single volume sometime in the early 1400s, several Koran leaves, and a distinctive Italian herbal featuring whimsical, anthropromorphic illustrations of plants.

Raul Hilberg Profiled in ‘The Nation’

Tuesday, April 20th, 2010

Raul Hilberg, the late professor emeritus of political science and author of the masterwork 1961 book The Destruction of the European Jews, was profiled this month on TheNation.com.

Drawing on documents of Hilberg’s gifted to the UVM Libraries upon his death, the article, “A Conscious Pariah: On Raul Hilberg,” reveals his complex and scholarly antagonistic relationship with Hannah Arendt, political theorist and author of Eichmann in Jerusalem, a book about the man responsible for implementing the Final Solution.

“As Hilberg read Arendt’s articles about Eichmann, he noticed a number of striking similarities to his own research (published in his book two years previously),” the article recounts. “He tallied them on an accounting spreadsheet stored in the accordion folder with the New Yorker issues (where Arendt’s writing on Eichmann was serialized). At the bottom of the spreadsheet he divided the instances into “cert.” and “prob.” and penciled hash marks next to each category.”

While Hilberg was vocally critical about the work of several Holocaust historians, “no one who wrote about the Holocaust nettled Hilberg more than Hannah Arendt,” the article notes. It goes on to reveal the deep contributions Hilberg made to his field, and the ways in which much of his work from The Destruction of the European Jews permeates Arendt’s writing.

Read the profile in full on TheNation.com.

Release Date: 04-14-2010
Author: Amanda Kenyon Waite
Email: Amanda.Waite@uvm.edu
Phone: 802/656-8381 Fax: (802) 656-3203

“Living in a Wired World” video available

Monday, April 12th, 2010

Video from the UVM Libraries sponsored lecture, “Living in a Wired World: Can Personal Privacy Survive in the 21st Century?” is now available via CCTV/Channel 17.

Watch the video online:

Or when it airs on channel 17, later this week:

  • Thursday April 15, 11:30 PM
  • Friday April 16, 4:30 AM
  • Friday April 16, 10:30 AM

Imagine waking up one day in your own personal terrarium, where everything you do and say can be seen by anyone passing by. Sound scary? In a world of Web cams, social networking sites, and GPs-equipped phones, your dorm walls may be more transparent than you realize.

The University of Vermont Libraries presented a lecture and book-signing by Burlington-based attorney and computer forensics expert Frederick Lane, about the challenges emerging technologies pose to one of our most controversial rights, on Wednesday, November 18th at 4:30 PM, in Billings North Lounge.

Lane’s American Privacy: The 400-Year History of Our Most Contested Right was published by Beacon Press in the fall of 2009.

Lane is the author of numerous books and articles on issues of intellectual freedom, including freedom of speech, privacy online and in the workplace, the impact of technology on our rights and liberties, and the separation of church and state. His work has been featured on Nightline, 60 Minutes, and The Daily Show with Jon Stewart.

Blackboard Jungle 3

Wednesday, March 24th, 2010

The 21st Century Classroom is a complex, diverse and multifaceted space for teaching and learning. The third annual Blackboard Jungle Symposium, designed for higher education and K-12 educators and administrators, addresses some of the challenges and emerging approaches used to navigate integration, equality, social justice and cultural competence in the classroom.

Join keynote speakers Dr. James A. Anderson, Dr. Sonia Nieto, Dr. Carlos E. Cortes, and Dr. Angela Y. Davis at this extraordinary three-day event (March 25-27, 2010).

Sample titles by keynote presenters, in the Bailey-Howe Library:

James A. Anderson

Handbook for the assessment of diversity

The unfinished agenda of Brown v. Board of Education by the editors of Black issues in higher education with James Anderson and Dara N. Byrne

Carlos E. Cortes

The children are watching : how the media teach about diversity

The making and remaking of a multiculturalist

Angela Davis

Women, race & class

Are prisons obsolete?

Sonia Nieto

Affirming diversity : the sociopolitical context of multicultural education

Why we teach edited by Sonia Nieto

Maple Madness: A Week of Celebration

Tuesday, March 16th, 2010

Maple Madness: A Week of Celebration at the UVM Libraries

The University of Vermont Libraries are celebrating the creation of a new Maple Syrup Research Website with a week of programs, exhibits, and food, beginning March 28th, 2010. The website is a comprehensive subject guide in the field of maple syrup, including historical publications and photographs related to maple syrup research at the University of Vermont.

Cook Maple, Win Prizes

A Maple Cook-Off will be held at UVM’s Davis Center on March 28th, from 4 to 6PM, featuring a buffet of maple delicacies, music by acoustic trio The Growlers, maple displays, children’s activities, and prizes of gift certificates to local eateries (awarded by food critics, activists, and producers). The event is free and open to the public. Register now! Get more information.

A Party in the Woods

John Elder, a Professor at Middlebury College, will present “A Party in the Woods: Sugaring, Community, and Celebration Under a Changing Sky,” on maple sugaring as a traditional rural lifeway that both illuminates contemporary challenges like climate change and exemplifies the need for celebration within environmental thinking today. The talk will take place in Bailey/Howe Library’s Special Collections on March 31st, at 5:30 PM, and is co-sponsored by Special Collections and the UVM Libraries.

Elder’s talk will follow a 4:30 PM reception to celebrate the launch of the Maple Syrup Research Website in the Bailey/Howe Library lobby.

Maple Exhibits

Maple exhibits in the Bailey/Howe Library include images of sugaring-off parties, historic recipes, the story of Helen Nearing, and much, much more. The exhibits are located in the Bailey/Howe Library Lobby and in Special Collections. They will be on display through June 2010.

For more information, please call 802-656-9980 or e-mail selene.colburn@uvm.edu.

Homemade Maple Syrup by Chiot’s Run, used in accordance with Creative Commons.

New Digital Collection of Long Trail’s Early Years

Tuesday, March 9th, 2010

The UVM Libraries’ Center for Digital Initiatives is pleased to announce our newest collection, the Long Trail Photographs, is now available online. This collection documents the nation’s first long-distance hiking trail. It is comprised of over 900 digitized glass lantern slides dating to the 1910s – 1930s. The collection captures the landscapes seen by early hikers, documenst recreational and maintenance activities on the trail, and provides an historical record of people associated with the trail’s formation. The photographs were taken by early Long Trail advocates Theron S. Dean and Herbert Wheaton Congdon.

This collection launch coincides with the March 11, 2010 centennial of the Green Mountain Club, the member organization which built and maintains the Long Trail. The CDI will present the collection to Green Mountain Club members at their Birthday Gala celebration. This GMC event is open to the public, but RSVP soon – space is limited.

New Book Highlights

Monday, March 8th, 2010

Jesus, jobs, and justice : African American women and religion by Bettye Collier-Thomas

“The most extensive and best-known histories of African-American religion in America give short shrift to the role of African-American women in religion. In her exhaustive and monumental study, Collier-Thomas (Daughters of Thunder) allows the strong voices of women as diverse as Ida B. Wells Barnett, Sarah Jane Woodson Early (the first black woman to serve on a faculty of an American university), and Mary McLeod Bethune to articulate the causes of liberation and justice in a culture where their race and sex continually called into question their self-understanding.” –Publisher’s Weekly

Making waste : leftovers and the eighteenth-century imagination by Sophie Gee

“Making Waste is a pleasure to read–vividly, gracefully, wittily written. It will be a valuable contribution to eighteenth-century literary and cultural studies.”–Cynthia Wall, University of Virginia

Of comics and men : a cultural history of American comic books by Jean-Paul Gabilliet ; translated by Bart Beaty and Nick Nguyen

“Originally published in France and long sought in English translation, Jean-Paul Gabilliet’s Of Comics and Men: A Cultural History of American Comic Books documents the rise and development of the American comic book industry from the 1930s to the present.” –Publisher’s information

Ripe : the search for the perfect tomato by Arthur Allen

“A robust tale of how tomatoes get to the table and why some don’t taste very good when they get there… An eye-opener for foodies, consumers and social-justice activists alike.” –Kirkus Reviews

CDI Discusses Local History Resources on TV

Wednesday, February 24th, 2010

As Seen On TV – Historical Sources Online

Live at 5:25 – Thursday, February 25, 2010 – Channel 17

The UVM Libraries’ Center for Digital Initiatives shared some of its excellent local history resources with the audience of Preservation Burlington’s “Live at 5:25.” Outreach Librarian Robin Katz was joined by two Library staff members who have helped create CDI collections.

Mary Van Buren-Swasey of the Cataloging department uses her local history expertise to create rich museum-level descriptive records for the ongoing additions to the McAllister photograph collection. Dan DeSanto, a staff member in Reference and Instruction and a recent graduate of the University of Alabama’s School of Library and Information Science, is currently working on our forthcoming collection of Long Trail photographs.

In this video, Robin, Mary and Dan highlight collection materials, share anecdotes about the research involved in digital collection production, and invite viewers to further explore the CDI.

This episode will be shown again on Channel 17 on these dates:
Tuesday March 2, 2:30 PM
Tuesday March 9, 2:30 PM
Tuesday March 16, 2:30 PM
Tuesday March 23, 2:30 PM

To invite the CDI to address your audience, please contact us.

See how the CDI was mentioned on a previous “Live at 5:25″ show entitled “Researching Your Old House” and featuring historian and museum consultant Erica Donnis:

New Book Highlights

Tuesday, December 1st, 2009

Appetite City book cover

Appetite city : a culinary history of New York by William Grimes

“William Grimes, a New York Times domestic correspondent and formerly the newspaper’s restaurant critic, whose latest book is a chronicle of New York’s transformation from a Dutch village at the edge of the wilderness to what he sees as the most diverse restaurant city in the world. –Dawn Drzal, The New York Times

Ordeal of Equality book cover

The ordeal of equality : did federal regulation fix the schools? by David K. Cohen and Susan L. Moffitt

google_preview

“Ever since the Title I program in 1965 appropriated nearly one billion dollars for public schools, federal money and programs have been influencing every school in America. With incisive clarity and wit, David Cohen and Susan Moffitt argue that enormous gaps existed between policies and programs, and the real-world practices that they attempted to change.” –Publisher’s information

Sexy Orchids Make Lousy Lovers book cover

Sexy orchids make lousy lovers & other unusual relationships by Marty Crump ; with illustrations by Alan Crump

google_preview

“Marty Crump’s book is a trawl through the whole gamut of weird animal behaviours. Watch out for spine-anointing, toad-chewing hedgehogs; tortoises that stomp the ground to draw up worms; and the mantids of the title that mate more effectively once the female has bitten off their heads. With Crump’s thirty-plus years of experience in the field, this beautifully written and charmingly illustrated book combines acute observation with helpful explanation. Nature has never seemed so bizarre and splendid.” -Adrian Barnett, New Scientist

Vampire God book cover

Vampire god : the allure of the undead in Western culture by Mary Y. Hallab

google_preview

“It seems we’re awash in vampires these days, in everything from movies, television shows, and novels to role-playing games, rock bands, and breakfast cereals. But what accounts for their enduring popular appeal? In Vampire God, Mary Y. Hallab examines the mythic figure of the vampire from its origins in early Greek and Slavic folklore, its transformation by Romantics like Byron, Le Fanu, and Stoker, and its diverse representations in present-day popular culture.” –Publisher’s information

British History Online

Tuesday, October 13th, 2009

Midsummer Bonfire

The UVM Libraries now subscribe to British History Online, a digital library featuring sources documenting the history of the British Isles (England, Scotland, and Wales), from the 11th through the 19th centuries.

Topics include religious, legal, educational, cultural, parliamentary, regional, and urban history. Materials can be browsed by subject, place, time period, or source.

Sample documents such as 16th and 17th century journals from the House of Commons, historical diaries, and early maps of London can be located through browsing or keyword searching.

British History Online was created by the Institute of Historical Research and the History of Parliament Trust.

“Midsummer–The Bonfire” [illustration] appears in The Everyday book, Or a guide to the year: Describing the Popular Amusements, Sports, Ceremonies, Manners, Customs and Events, Incident to the three Hundred and Sixty-Five days, In past and present times, by William Hone, 1826. Retrieved via A Clipart History.