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New Book Highlights

Thursday, September 8th, 2011

These works can be found on our New Book shelf in Bailey/Howe, an ever-rotating sampling of things we’re adding to our collection. You can also review all our newest books online, and subscribe via RSS to receive alerts about acquisitions, by discipline.

The new cool : a visionary teacher, his FIRST robotics team, and the ultimate battle of smarts by Neal Bascomb

When Dean Kamen, a millionaire inventor, realized that most kids couldn’t name a living scientist, he created the FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Robotics Competition to encourage high-school students to consider scientific careers. Bascomb follows team 1717, the D’Penguineers, from Goleta, California, during the 2009 season. The team of high-school seniors, all rookie robot builders, is led by Amir Abo-Shaeer, a physics teacher and the founder of a fledgling engineering academy.

Pages from a black radical’s notebook : a James Boggs reader edited by Stephen M. Ward ; with an afterword by Grace Lee Boggs.

Born in the rural American south, James Boggs lived nearly his entire adult life in Detroit and worked as a factory worker for twenty-eight years while immersing himself in the political struggles of the industrial urban north. During and after the years he spent in the auto industry, Boggs wrote two books, co-authored two others, and penned dozens of essays, pamphlets, reviews, manifestos, and newspaper columns to become known as a pioneering revolutionary theorist and community organizer. –Publisher’s information

Ruta Tannenbaum by Miljenko Jergović ; translated from the Croatian by Stephen M. Dickey

Set in the Croatian city of Zagreb, then a part of Yugoslavia, in the period between the world wars Ruta Tannenbaum’s central character is an ingenue inspired by the real-life figure Lea Deutsch, the now-forgotten Shirley Temple of Yugoslavia who was murdered in the Holocaust. Using their shared Jewish heritage as a starting point, Jergovic´ constructs a fictional family history populated by historical figures with the precocious Ruta at the center. –Publisher’s information

Unlikely friends : bridging ties and diverse friendships by James A. Vela-McConnell

There are those individuals who have established deep, lasting relationships with others from very different backgrounds of race, gender, sexual orientation, etc. Research indicates that such friendships are a relatively rare phenomenon. While many study the reasons for this pattern, the research presented here focuses on the successes of the few: ‘How have you broken down the social distance between you and bridged the social distance that separates you?’

Children’s Art & Writing Collection

Friday, February 11th, 2011

Prospect Archive of Children’s Work

The Prospect Archive of Children’s Work collection  offers a longitudinal look at the art and writing of nine children, as well as teacher records and information on the unique Prospect School and Center.

About Prospect

The Prospect School (1965-1991), deeply influenced by the philosophy of John Dewey, and in particular his commitment to the agency for the learner and his conviction that the desire for learning is inherent in every person, enrolled children from all walks of life, from age 4 through 14, with tuition waived or adjusted according to need.

The Prospect Center (1979-2010), under the leadership of co-founder Patricia Carini, developed a disciplined, collaborative method for understanding children as thinkers and learners called the descriptive review of the child. The descriptive review is a mode of inquiry that draws on the rich, detailed knowledge teachers and parents have of children and on their ability to describe those children in full and balanced ways, so that they become visible as complex persons with particular strengths, interests, and capacities.

New Book Highlights

Tuesday, September 14th, 2010

Ain’t nothing like the real thing : how the Apollo Theater shaped American entertainment edited by Richard Carlin and Kinshasha Holman Conwill

“The Apollo Theater has provided a stage for performers and a setting for the creativity of black American music that has hugely influenced American music in general. Recognizing the seventy-fifth anniversary of the Apollo Theater, this book offers essays by entertainment historians, critics, and journalists chronicling the legacy of the storied theater.” -Booklist

How to grow a school garden : a complete guide for parents and teachers by Arden Bucklin-Sporer and Rachel Kathleen Pringle

“In this groundbreaking resource, two school garden pioneers offer parents, teachers, and school administrators everything they need to know to build school gardens and to develop the programs that support them.” –Publisher’s information

Sayyid Qutb and the origins of radical Islamism by John Calvert

“Sayyid Qutb (1906-1966) was an influential Egyptian ideologue who established the theoretical basis for radical Islamism in the postcolonial Sunni Muslim world. Lacking a pure understanding of the leader’s life and work, the popular media has conflated Qutb’s moral purpose with the aims of Osama bin Laden and al-Qaeda. He is often portrayed as a terrorist, Islamo-Fascist, and advocate of murder. An expert on social protest and political resistance, John Calvert rescues Qutb from misrepresentation and follows the evolution of his thought within the context of his time.” –Publisher’s information

Three sisters by Bi Feiyu ; translated from the Chinese by Howard Goldblatt and Sylvia Li-chun Lin

“In a small village in China, the Wang family has produced seven sisters in its quest to have a boy; three of the sisters emerge as the lead characters in this remarkable novel. From the small-town treachery of the village to the slogans of the Cultural Revolution to the harried pace of city life, Bi Feiyu follows the women as they strive to change the course of their destinies and battle against an “infinite ocean of people” in a China that does not truly belong to them. Yumi will use her dignity, Yuxiu her powers of seduction, and Yuyang her ambition—all in an effort to take control of their world, their bodies, and their lives.” –Publisher’s information

Blackboard Jungle 3

Wednesday, March 24th, 2010

The 21st Century Classroom is a complex, diverse and multifaceted space for teaching and learning. The third annual Blackboard Jungle Symposium, designed for higher education and K-12 educators and administrators, addresses some of the challenges and emerging approaches used to navigate integration, equality, social justice and cultural competence in the classroom.

Join keynote speakers Dr. James A. Anderson, Dr. Sonia Nieto, Dr. Carlos E. Cortes, and Dr. Angela Y. Davis at this extraordinary three-day event (March 25-27, 2010).

Sample titles by keynote presenters, in the Bailey-Howe Library:

James A. Anderson

Handbook for the assessment of diversity

The unfinished agenda of Brown v. Board of Education by the editors of Black issues in higher education with James Anderson and Dara N. Byrne

Carlos E. Cortes

The children are watching : how the media teach about diversity

The making and remaking of a multiculturalist

Angela Davis

Women, race & class

Are prisons obsolete?

Sonia Nieto

Affirming diversity : the sociopolitical context of multicultural education

Why we teach edited by Sonia Nieto

CDI Collaborates with Service-Learning Course

Wednesday, January 6th, 2010

This Spring, the CDI is partnering with Dr. Barri Tinkler’s EDSC 225: Teaching Social Studies in Secondary Schools

Students in this service-learning course will use our collections to create webquests for Burlington High School classrooms. A webquest is a web-based inquiry activity that allows students to pursue answers to essential questions through the investigation of digital resources. After the course, their work will be publicly available to students at teachers at other schools.

It is the CDI’s goal to make primary sources available for K-12 students in Vermont and beyond. Collaborating with EDSC 225 will allow us to better reach high school students. This partnership also allows UVM Education students to learn about curriculum development and online learning resources in a hands-on, professional environment.

Want to sign up for this course? Matriculated and Continuing Education students can now use CRN 11333 to enroll. Contact the registrar for more details.

Interested in similarly collaborating with the Center for Digital Initiatives? Email us!

Photo from http://www.flickr.com/photos/cristic/ / CC BY 2.0

New Book Highlights

Tuesday, December 1st, 2009

Appetite City book cover

Appetite city : a culinary history of New York by William Grimes

“William Grimes, a New York Times domestic correspondent and formerly the newspaper’s restaurant critic, whose latest book is a chronicle of New York’s transformation from a Dutch village at the edge of the wilderness to what he sees as the most diverse restaurant city in the world. –Dawn Drzal, The New York Times

Ordeal of Equality book cover

The ordeal of equality : did federal regulation fix the schools? by David K. Cohen and Susan L. Moffitt

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“Ever since the Title I program in 1965 appropriated nearly one billion dollars for public schools, federal money and programs have been influencing every school in America. With incisive clarity and wit, David Cohen and Susan Moffitt argue that enormous gaps existed between policies and programs, and the real-world practices that they attempted to change.” –Publisher’s information

Sexy Orchids Make Lousy Lovers book cover

Sexy orchids make lousy lovers & other unusual relationships by Marty Crump ; with illustrations by Alan Crump

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“Marty Crump’s book is a trawl through the whole gamut of weird animal behaviours. Watch out for spine-anointing, toad-chewing hedgehogs; tortoises that stomp the ground to draw up worms; and the mantids of the title that mate more effectively once the female has bitten off their heads. With Crump’s thirty-plus years of experience in the field, this beautifully written and charmingly illustrated book combines acute observation with helpful explanation. Nature has never seemed so bizarre and splendid.” -Adrian Barnett, New Scientist

Vampire God book cover

Vampire god : the allure of the undead in Western culture by Mary Y. Hallab

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“It seems we’re awash in vampires these days, in everything from movies, television shows, and novels to role-playing games, rock bands, and breakfast cereals. But what accounts for their enduring popular appeal? In Vampire God, Mary Y. Hallab examines the mythic figure of the vampire from its origins in early Greek and Slavic folklore, its transformation by Romantics like Byron, Le Fanu, and Stoker, and its diverse representations in present-day popular culture.” –Publisher’s information

SourceOECD: A Focus on Global Issues

Friday, November 13th, 2009

Big Blue Marble


A great online source on economics and social issues worldwide, that can be used by students and scholars working in a broad range of disciplines, including economics, business, social sciences, development, statistics, environmental science and studies, education, agriculture, and politics.

SourceOECD provides access to the publications of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), an international governmental organization (IGO) with 30 member countries sharing a commitment to democratic government and the market economy. With active relationships with some 70 other countries, NGOs and civil society, it has a global reach.

Publications can be accessed by theme in the advanced search mode.

Sample books on energy include Act Locally, Trade Globally: Emissions Trading for Climate Policy, Biofuels for Transport: An International Perspective, and World Energy Outlook 2009.

Data sets can be downloaded into Microsoft Excel.

Want tips on how to use SourceOECD?

Check out the Emory University Libraries “A (Relatively) Quick Guide to Using SourceOECD” or Ask a Librarian at UVM for help.

See also: Official SourceOECD user guide.

“The Blue Marble,” a public domain NASA photograph was taken in 1972 from Apollo 17. It was accessed via NASA’a Visible Earth website.

New Book Highlights

Friday, November 13th, 2009

Arachnids cover

Arachnids by Jan Beccaloni

“This adventurous volume summarizes all existing knowledge about each major type of arachnid, revealing their secrets through detailed species accounts, brilliant photographs, and a compelling cast of eight-legged characters. It examines the anatomy, habitat, behavior and distribution of each lineage, from the garden spider to the death stalker scorpion and even a species of mite that lives inside a monkey’s lungs. Drawing on the vast resources at London’s Natural History Museum, Arachnids spins a sensational tale, debunking common myths and delving deep into the lives of these bizarre and beautiful creatures.” –Publisher’s information

The College Fear Factor cover

The college fear factor : how students and professors misunderstand one another by Rebecca D. Cox

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“We have learned a great deal in the last twenty years about what goes on in classrooms. But no one before Cox has shown so clearly what teacher-student interactions about learning and teaching are like, how these are interpreted, or misinterpreted, and with what consequences. The implications go far beyond community colleges. This is a book that should be read by every teacher at every level.”
–Marvin Lazerson, University of Pennsylvania

Ghostbread cover

Ghostbread by Sonja Livingston

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“‘I know where I came from.’ With this declaration, the author of Ghostbread takes us on a journey through a childhood scarred by poverty and graced by love. Like an American version of Angela’s Ashes, the book allows us to encounter—and see, taste, and smell it—through the eyes of a beleaguered and intelligent child. We are grateful to be reminded of the human reality at the heart of a world that is all too often hidden in governmental ‘poverty indicators,’ and also glad that the author has survived to tell the tale.” –Kathleen Norris, author of Acedia & Me: A Marriage, Monks, and a Writer’s Life

Manga Kamishibai cover

Manga kamishibai : the art of Japanese paper theater by Eric P. Nash

“Before giant robots, space ships, and masked super heroes filled the pages of Japanese comic books–known as manga–such characters were regularly seen on the streets of Japan in kamishibai stories. Manga Kamishibai: The Art of Japanese Paper Theater tells the history of this fascinating and nearly vanished Japanese art form that paved the way for modern-day comic books, and is the missing link in the development of modern manga.” –Publisher’s information

150 Years of Dewey Education

Friday, October 23rd, 2009

John Dewey at UVM in 1949

[John Dewey at UVM in 1949; courtesy of Special Collections]

The American philosopher, educator, and UVM alumnus, John Dewey, was born in Burlington, Vermont 150 years ago on October 20, 1859. Widely recognized as the “father of progressive education,” Dewey’s works investigated the relationship between democracy and education and the centrality of the student in curriculum.

Bailey/Howe Library is home to a wealth of resources on John Dewey’s life and work, including over 150 books by and about Dewey (which can be located via the library catalog).

Bailey/Howe’s Special Collections houses the John Dewey Papers, which include research materials and photographs compiled in conjunction with Dewey’s 1949 visit to UVM, marking his 90th birthday, as well as correspondence with John Dewey and his family. Additional progressive education collections include the papers of Theodore Brameld, Paul Nash, and Kenneth D. Benne – all scholars of the philosophy of education – and the records of Vermont’s Prospect School, which contain hundreds of examples of student work.

Student work by "Virginia," from the Prospect Center Archives

[Student work by "Virginia," from the Prospect Center Archives; courtesy of Special Collections]

For more information on John Dewey, see the Center for Dewey Studies, at Southern Illinois University Carbondale.