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New Books

Friday, November 18th, 2011

These works can be found on our New Book shelf in Bailey/Howe, an ever-rotating sampling of things we’re adding to our collection. You can also review all our newest books online, and subscribe via RSS to receive alerts about acquisitions, by discipline.

FOOD CHAIN OF COMMAND

In The Vegetarian Imperative, Anand M. Saxena, a scientist and lifelong vegetarian, explains why we need to make better choices: for better health, to eliminate world hunger, and, ultimately, to save the planet. Our insatiable appetite for animal-based foods contributes directly to high rates of chronic diseases-resulting in both illness and death. It also leads to a devastating overuse of natural resources that dangerously depletes the food available for human consumption. Supported by up-to-date and accurate scientific data, The Vegetarian Imperative will make you rethink what you eat-and help you save the planet.

The Vegetarian Imperative by Anand M. Saxena

KITSCH WHILE KITSCH CAN

 

In 1961, a solo exhibition by Argentine-Italian artist Lucio Fontana met with a scathing critical response from New York art critics. Fontana (1899–1968), well known in Europe for his series of slashed monochrome paintings, offered New York ten canvases slashed and punctured, thickly painted in luridly brilliant hues and embellished with chunks of colored glass. One critic described the work as “halfway between constructivism and costume jewelry,” unwittingly putting his finger on the contradiction at the heart of these paintings and much of Fontana’s work: the cut canvases suggest avant-garde iconoclasm, but the glittery ornamentation evokes outmoded forms of kitsch. Anthony White examines a selection of the artist’s work from the 1930s to the 1960s, arguing that Fontana attacked the idealism of twentieth-century art by marrying modernist aesthetics to industrialized mass culture, and attacked modernism’s purity in a way that anticipated both pop art and postmodernism.

Lucio Fontana: Between Utopia and Kitsch by Anthony White

MOVING MOUNTAINS

Kunsang thought she would never leave Tibet. One of Tibet’s youngest nuns, she grew up in a remote mountain village where, as a teenager, she entered the local nunnery. Though simple, Kunsang’s life gave her all she needed: a oneness with nature, a sense of the spiritual in all things. She married a monk, had two children and lived in peace and prayer. The Chinese invasion of Tibet in 1950 changed everything for Kunsang. When Chinese soldiers began destroying her monastery, she and her family were forced to flee in a hair-raising trek across the Himalayas in winter—-and ultimately all the way to Switzerland.

Across Many Mountains: A Tibetan Family’s Epic Journey from Opression to Freedom by Yangzom Brauen

COUNT ON THEM

Featured here–in their own words–are major research mathematicians whose cutting-edge discoveries have advanced the frontiers of the field, such as Lars Ahlfors, Mary Cartwright, Dusa McDuff, and Atle Selberg. Others are leading mathematicians who have also been highly influential as teachers and mentors, like Tom Apostol and Jean Taylor. Fern Hunt describes what it was like to be among the first black women to earn a PhD in mathematics. Harold Bacon made trips to Alcatraz to help a prisoner learn calculus. Thomas Banchoff, who first became interested in the fourth dimension while reading a Captain Marvel comic, relates his fascinating friendship with Salvador Dalí.

Fascinating Mathematical People: Interviews and Memoirs Edited by Donald J. Albers and Gerald L. Alexanderson

New Book Highlights

Thursday, September 8th, 2011

These works can be found on our New Book shelf in Bailey/Howe, an ever-rotating sampling of things we’re adding to our collection. You can also review all our newest books online, and subscribe via RSS to receive alerts about acquisitions, by discipline.

The new cool : a visionary teacher, his FIRST robotics team, and the ultimate battle of smarts by Neal Bascomb

When Dean Kamen, a millionaire inventor, realized that most kids couldn’t name a living scientist, he created the FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Robotics Competition to encourage high-school students to consider scientific careers. Bascomb follows team 1717, the D’Penguineers, from Goleta, California, during the 2009 season. The team of high-school seniors, all rookie robot builders, is led by Amir Abo-Shaeer, a physics teacher and the founder of a fledgling engineering academy.

Pages from a black radical’s notebook : a James Boggs reader edited by Stephen M. Ward ; with an afterword by Grace Lee Boggs.

Born in the rural American south, James Boggs lived nearly his entire adult life in Detroit and worked as a factory worker for twenty-eight years while immersing himself in the political struggles of the industrial urban north. During and after the years he spent in the auto industry, Boggs wrote two books, co-authored two others, and penned dozens of essays, pamphlets, reviews, manifestos, and newspaper columns to become known as a pioneering revolutionary theorist and community organizer. –Publisher’s information

Ruta Tannenbaum by Miljenko Jergović ; translated from the Croatian by Stephen M. Dickey

Set in the Croatian city of Zagreb, then a part of Yugoslavia, in the period between the world wars Ruta Tannenbaum’s central character is an ingenue inspired by the real-life figure Lea Deutsch, the now-forgotten Shirley Temple of Yugoslavia who was murdered in the Holocaust. Using their shared Jewish heritage as a starting point, Jergovic´ constructs a fictional family history populated by historical figures with the precocious Ruta at the center. –Publisher’s information

Unlikely friends : bridging ties and diverse friendships by James A. Vela-McConnell

There are those individuals who have established deep, lasting relationships with others from very different backgrounds of race, gender, sexual orientation, etc. Research indicates that such friendships are a relatively rare phenomenon. While many study the reasons for this pattern, the research presented here focuses on the successes of the few: ‘How have you broken down the social distance between you and bridged the social distance that separates you?’

Fleming + CDI Digitize Images of Japan

Wednesday, February 16th, 2011

A Tourist’s Album of Japan

Katherine Wolcott and her uncle, Robert Hull Fleming, compiled this photo album on their visit to Japan in 1909. It contains nearly 40 leaves of collected photographs and postcards, numbering two to three per album page. The pictures range in content, some depicting staged photos of daily life while others portray landscapes and countryside. The album itself measures approximately 11 x 14 x 4 inches. Users can view the entire album, or individual images.

A Collaboration

This collection represents a collaboration between the university’s Robert Hull Fleming Museum, where the album is housed, and the UVM Libraries’ Center for Digital Initiatives. Conceived of as part of the Museum’s Shadows of the Samurai: Japanese Warrior Traditions exhibit, this new online resource invites many perspectives on early twentieth century Japan.

Japan in Context

Wolcott’s album captures a unique view of Japan at the brink of burgeoning Western influence. After defeating the Russians in the Russo Japanese War (1904-05), Japan began to cement itself as a global power, and its efforts to modernize began to attract Westerners. The images in this album depict a Japan with a strong national heritage and cultural appreciation as well as a newfound embrace of modernization and technology.Most of the pictures in the album sold commercially as a form of postcard. In the early 1900s, the Japanese populace began consuming millions of these types of commercially produced picture postcards. Eventually, the medium became so popular that it started to replace the more traditional wood block print. The citizenry sought pictures of their budding nation, wanting to hold a still image of the rapidly modernizing and changing countryside.

Want More Cornel West?

Tuesday, January 25th, 2011

If you’re excited about Cornel West’s visit to UVM in recognition of Martin Luther King, Jr. Day (soon to be rescheduled!) and want to learn more, check out the nearly forty titles by or about West in the library collection.

Here are some sample books and videos:

The African-American century : how Black Americans have shaped our country by Henry Louis Gates, Jr. and Cornel West

Cornel West : a critical reader edited by George Yancy

Keeping faith : philosophy and race in America by Cornel West

Jews & Blacks : a dialogue on race, religion, and culture in America by Michael Lerner & Cornel West

Prophetic fragments by Cornel West

Cornel West : the politics of redemption by Rosemary Cowan

Examined life [DVD] : philosophy is in the street written and directed by Astra Taylor ; producer, Bill Imperial, producer (NFB), Lea Marin

New Book Highlights

Wednesday, January 19th, 2011

God in the details : American religion in popular culture edited by Eric Michael Mazur and Kate McCarthy, 2nd ed.

“Exploring the blurred boundary between religion and pop culture, God in the Details offers a provocative look at the breadth and persistence of religious themes in the American consciousness. This new edition reflects the explosion of online activity since the first edition, including chapters on the spiritual implications of social networking sites, and the hazy line between real and virtual religious life in the online community Second Life. Also new to this edition are chapters on the migration of black male expression from churches to athletic stadiums, new configurations of the sacred and the commercial, and post 9/11 spirituality and religious redemption through an analysis of vampire drama, True Blood. Popular chapters on media, sports, and other pop culture experiences have been revised and updated, making this an invaluable resource for students and scholars alike.” –Publisher’s information

The hungry world : America’s Cold War battle against poverty in Asia by Nick Cullather

“A pioneering and transformative work that tracks the politics of hunger from the invention of the calorie to Asia’s Cold War ideological battlegrounds, The Hungry World explores, with a sharp, lively sense of irony, American scientists’ and policy-makers’ relentless and often futile efforts to transmute the conflictual politics of rural deprivation into a technocratic politics of agricultural production.” –Paul A. Kramer, author of The Blood of Government: Race, Empire, the United States and the Philippines

Daniel by Henning Mankell ; translated from the Swedish by Steven T. Murray

“Set in the 1870s, this earnest and heartbreaking story opens with the unsolved murder of a mentally retarded Swedish girl, but this isn’t a mystery in the mode of Mankell’s international bestselling Kurt Wallander novels (Firewall, etc.). Hans Bengler, a Swedish entomologist, travels across southern Africa in search of undiscovered insects. In the desert, he finds an orphaned native boy, whom he adopts on impulse and calls Daniel. Bengler brings Daniel back to Sweden to exhibit him for money. A link eventually emerges between the girl’s murder and Daniel’s story, which dramatically illuminates the evils of colonialism (Bengler notes that he “had to make the important decisions for these black people”) and the cultural chasm between Europeans and Africans. Mankell fully understands Daniel’s radically different cultural perspective and indelibly captures the boy’s longing to return to his homeland and the tragic consequences of his forced exile.” –Publisher’s Weekly

Sheila Hicks : 50 years by Joan Simon and Susan C. Faxon ; with an essay by Whitney Chadwick

“Sheila Hicks (born 1934) is a pioneering artist noted for objects and public commissions whose structures are built of color and fiber. This volume accompanies the first major retrospective of Hicks’s work; it documents the remarkable versatility and dramatically divergent scale of her textiles as well as her distinctive use, and surprising range, of materials. Hicks deliberately and provocatively engages what are often considered mutually exclusive domains, rethinking and pushing the limits of generally accepted contexts, conditions, and frameworks. These include distinct objects and temporal, performative actions; studio works and commissions for public buildings; and textiles made in artisanal workshops as well as for industrial production in places as different as Chile, France, Germany, India, Japan, Mexico, Morocco, Sweden, and the United States.” –Publisher’s information

Blackboard Jungle 3

Wednesday, March 24th, 2010

The 21st Century Classroom is a complex, diverse and multifaceted space for teaching and learning. The third annual Blackboard Jungle Symposium, designed for higher education and K-12 educators and administrators, addresses some of the challenges and emerging approaches used to navigate integration, equality, social justice and cultural competence in the classroom.

Join keynote speakers Dr. James A. Anderson, Dr. Sonia Nieto, Dr. Carlos E. Cortes, and Dr. Angela Y. Davis at this extraordinary three-day event (March 25-27, 2010).

Sample titles by keynote presenters, in the Bailey-Howe Library:

James A. Anderson

Handbook for the assessment of diversity

The unfinished agenda of Brown v. Board of Education by the editors of Black issues in higher education with James Anderson and Dara N. Byrne

Carlos E. Cortes

The children are watching : how the media teach about diversity

The making and remaking of a multiculturalist

Angela Davis

Women, race & class

Are prisons obsolete?

Sonia Nieto

Affirming diversity : the sociopolitical context of multicultural education

Why we teach edited by Sonia Nieto

New Book Highlights

Monday, March 8th, 2010

Jesus, jobs, and justice : African American women and religion by Bettye Collier-Thomas

“The most extensive and best-known histories of African-American religion in America give short shrift to the role of African-American women in religion. In her exhaustive and monumental study, Collier-Thomas (Daughters of Thunder) allows the strong voices of women as diverse as Ida B. Wells Barnett, Sarah Jane Woodson Early (the first black woman to serve on a faculty of an American university), and Mary McLeod Bethune to articulate the causes of liberation and justice in a culture where their race and sex continually called into question their self-understanding.” –Publisher’s Weekly

Making waste : leftovers and the eighteenth-century imagination by Sophie Gee

“Making Waste is a pleasure to read–vividly, gracefully, wittily written. It will be a valuable contribution to eighteenth-century literary and cultural studies.”–Cynthia Wall, University of Virginia

Of comics and men : a cultural history of American comic books by Jean-Paul Gabilliet ; translated by Bart Beaty and Nick Nguyen

“Originally published in France and long sought in English translation, Jean-Paul Gabilliet’s Of Comics and Men: A Cultural History of American Comic Books documents the rise and development of the American comic book industry from the 1930s to the present.” –Publisher’s information

Ripe : the search for the perfect tomato by Arthur Allen

“A robust tale of how tomatoes get to the table and why some don’t taste very good when they get there… An eye-opener for foodies, consumers and social-justice activists alike.” –Kirkus Reviews

Documentaries on Poverty in America

Thursday, January 7th, 2010

Two recent documentaries provide insights just in time for National Poverty in America Awareness Month. Both are available at Bailey/Howe’s Media Resources.

Living Broke DVD cover

Living broke in boom times : lessons from the Movement to End Poverty DVD produced, directed, and edited by Kathleen Dara Kell ; original films produced and directed by Pamela Yates and Peter Kinoy.

“It is a wonderful documentary, heart-rending in its depiction of homelessness and desperation, yet inspiring in what it shows about the magnificence of people fighting back… I think it can play an important role in arousing people to action.” -Howard Zinn

Learn more: http://skylightpictures.com/site/film_detail/lbibt/

Two Nations DVD cover

The two nations of black America produced by June Cross ; correspondent: Henry Louis Gates, Jr. ; written by June Cross and Henry Louis Gates, Jr. ; WGBH Educational Foundation.

“In this FRONTLINE report, correspondent Henry Louis Gates, Jr., a Harvard scholar, explores the gaping chasm between the upper and lower classes of black America and probes why it has happened: “How have we reached this point where we have both the largest black middle class and the largest black underclass in our history?” –Producer information

Learn more: http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/shows/race/

New Book Highlights

Tuesday, December 1st, 2009

Appetite City book cover

Appetite city : a culinary history of New York by William Grimes

“William Grimes, a New York Times domestic correspondent and formerly the newspaper’s restaurant critic, whose latest book is a chronicle of New York’s transformation from a Dutch village at the edge of the wilderness to what he sees as the most diverse restaurant city in the world. –Dawn Drzal, The New York Times

Ordeal of Equality book cover

The ordeal of equality : did federal regulation fix the schools? by David K. Cohen and Susan L. Moffitt

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“Ever since the Title I program in 1965 appropriated nearly one billion dollars for public schools, federal money and programs have been influencing every school in America. With incisive clarity and wit, David Cohen and Susan Moffitt argue that enormous gaps existed between policies and programs, and the real-world practices that they attempted to change.” –Publisher’s information

Sexy Orchids Make Lousy Lovers book cover

Sexy orchids make lousy lovers & other unusual relationships by Marty Crump ; with illustrations by Alan Crump

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“Marty Crump’s book is a trawl through the whole gamut of weird animal behaviours. Watch out for spine-anointing, toad-chewing hedgehogs; tortoises that stomp the ground to draw up worms; and the mantids of the title that mate more effectively once the female has bitten off their heads. With Crump’s thirty-plus years of experience in the field, this beautifully written and charmingly illustrated book combines acute observation with helpful explanation. Nature has never seemed so bizarre and splendid.” -Adrian Barnett, New Scientist

Vampire God book cover

Vampire god : the allure of the undead in Western culture by Mary Y. Hallab

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“It seems we’re awash in vampires these days, in everything from movies, television shows, and novels to role-playing games, rock bands, and breakfast cereals. But what accounts for their enduring popular appeal? In Vampire God, Mary Y. Hallab examines the mythic figure of the vampire from its origins in early Greek and Slavic folklore, its transformation by Romantics like Byron, Le Fanu, and Stoker, and its diverse representations in present-day popular culture.” –Publisher’s information