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Fair Use Week at UVM Libraries

February 17th, 2017

UVM Libraries Celebrate Fair Use Week! February 20- 24th

What is Fair Use/Fair Dealing Week?

By Jeanene Light of the Dana Medical Library

Fair Use/Fair Dealing Week is an annual celebration of the important doctrines of fair use in the United States and fair dealing in Canada and other jurisdictions. Under these terms, copyrighted materials are allowed use without permission from the copyright holder under certain circumstances. Fair use is one of the traditional safety valves intended to balance the interests of copyright holders with the public interest in the wider distribution and use of creative works by allowing certain limited uses that might otherwise be considered infringement.

While students, faculty, librarians, journalists, and all users of copyrighted material employ fair use and fair dealing on a daily basis, Fair Use/Fair Dealing Week celebrates this important right.

How do you determine fair use in your research or education?

To determine if a use is “fair use”, there are typically four factors used to evaluate the work in question. Read more and find more information, about these four factors at the University of Texas Libraries website page on Fair Use. Also learn about Fair Use in a Day in the Life of a College Student in the poster below.

Contact Jeanene Light at 656-0521 with questions about Fair Use Week at UVM.

 

Scholarly Metrics – Research by UVM Library Faculty

February 7th, 2017

Hot off the presses! Check out this article on UVM Faculty attitudes towards, and use of scholarly metrics by Bailey/Howe Librarians, Daniel DeSanto and Aaron Nichols. Congratulations Dan and Aaron.

Abstract:

This article presents the results of a faculty survey conducted at the University of Vermont during academic year 2014-2015. The survey asked faculty about: familiarity with scholarly metrics, metric-seeking habits, help-seeking habits, and the role of metrics in their department’s tenure and promotion process. The survey also gathered faculty opinions on how well scholarly metrics reflect the importance of scholarly work and how faculty feel about administrators gathering institutional scholarly metric information. Results point to the necessity of understanding the campus landscape of faculty knowledge, opinion, importance, and use of scholarly metrics before engaging faculty in further discussions about quantifying the impact of their scholarly work.

Citation and link:

DeSanto, D., & Nichols, A. (2017). Scholarly Metrics Baseline: A Survey of Faculty Knowledge, Use, and Opinion about Scholarly Metrics. College & Research Libraries, 78(2), 150–170. https://doi.org/10.5860/crl.78.2.150

Vermont Refugee and Immigrant Stories

February 5th, 2017

Here is a list of selected memoirs and biographies from immigrants and refugees who left their homes for safer and better lives in Vermont. (Click on a book’s title to find its call number and location in the library.)

Thank You for My Green Card
In this memoir, Edgar May describes the journey he took to the U.S. from Zurich, Switzerland with his mother and sister, former Vermont Governor Madeleine Kunin, to escape the growing threat of the Holocaust. He writes about his work as a journalist, his service in the U.S. Army, his contributions to the War on Poverty and Special Olympics, and his time in the Vermont House of Representatives (1983-1991) and the Vermont Senate (1984-1990).

First They Killed My Father: A Daughter of Cambodia Remembers
Lucky Child: A Daughter of Cambodia Reunites with the Sister She Left Behind
Lulu in the Sky: A Daughter of Cambodia Finds Love, Healing, and Double Happiness

As a small child, Loung Ung survived Cambodia’s brutal Pol Pot regime, and escaped with a brother to a refugee camp in Thailand before relocating to Vermont as a 10-year old. Her first memoir chronicles that experience. In her second memoir, she writes about the challenges of coping with post-traumatic stress and assimilating into  American life in Vermont, and in alternating chapters writes about the life of her only surviving sister, still in Cambodia. Ung has said that the last volume of her trilogy, “is my journey of going from surviving to thriving… about reconnecting, reclaiming, and rejoicing.” She recounts her efforts to reconcile a past and present through love, activism, and new connections with her family and the country of her birth.

Greek Epic: The Latchis Family & the New England Theater Empire They Built
Greek Epic tells the story of immigrant Demetrios Latsis and the four generations of his family who built a movie theater empire from their home base in Brattleboro.

Refugee: The Ugliest Word, by Aftaba Mezetovic.
Bosnian refugee and Winooski educator Aftaba Mezetovic dedicates her book of poems “to refugees worldwide who have survived war, concentration camps and loss of homeland.”

Lost Generation: The Story of a Sudanese Orphan
Peter Garang Deng moved from a childhood of deprivation in South Sudan to a refugee camp in Kenya before coming to Burlington, Vermont, where he graduated from Champlain College and established a foundation dedicated to educating South Sudanese orphans.

Giving a Lift in Time: A Finnish Immigrant’s Story
Sarcka’s family came to Vermont from Finland in the late 19th-century to work in the marble quarries near Proctor. In 1932, Sarcka and his wife established Spring Lake Ranch, a therapeutic community for people with mental illness, in Cuttingsville.

The Bridging of Two Cultures
The Bridging of Two Cultures is an account of “how one family of French Canadian descent, without compromising its heritage, learned to live and cope in the border village of Derby Line, Vermont.”

Fall in Love with a New Book!

February 1st, 2017

Stop by the first floor New Books section of the Bailey/Howe Library and take a look at some of these gorgeous new art books!

 

Alex Janvier

“Many of his masterpieces involve an eloquent blend of both abstract and representational images with bright, often symbolic colours. As a First Nations person emerging from a history of oppression and many struggles for cultural empowerment, Janvier paints both the challenges and celebrations that he has encountered in his lifetime. Alex proudly credits the beadwork and birch bark basketry of his mother and other relatives as influencing his art.” – from Alex Janvier’s website.

      

 

The Edge of the Earth : Climate Change in Photography and Video

“Increasingly and forebodingly, artists are turning their attention to the subject of climate change, in poignant and often confrontational ways. The Edge of the Earth: Climate Change in Photography and Video features recent and historic work by a range of pioneering and visionary artists from around the world. Photojournalism from the RIC’s famed Black Star Collection is also included, contextualising artistic reflections alongside half a century of historical reportage on the environment.” – from the Ryerson Image Centre website.

      

 

Hieronymus Bosch: Visions of Genius

“Hieronymus Bosch is a world-class artist. His characteristic work full of illusions and hallucinations, bizarre monsters and nightmares, depicts the great themes of his time: temptation, sin and judgement. His work was no less popular after his death and it has inspired innumerable artists to the present day. It also means that Bosch is one of the most important artists of the late Middle Ages. His popularity is, of course, connected with the puzzling character of his images. You remain fascinated.” – from the Bosch Exhibition website at the Noordbrabants Museum.

      

 

Pipilotti Rist: Pixel Forest

“Over the past thirty years, Rist (b. 1962) has achieved international renown as a pioneer of video art and multimedia installations. Her mesmerizing works envelop viewers in sensual, vibrantly colored kaleidoscopic projections that fuse the natural world with the technological sublime. Referring to her art as a “glorification of the wonder of evolution,” Rist maintains a deep sense of curiosity that pervades her explorations of physical and psychological experiences. Her works bring viewers into unexpected, all-consuming encounters with the textures, forms, and functions of the living universe around us.” – from the New Museum’s website on the latest Pipilotti Rist exhibition, Pixel Forest.

      

Information Literacy – Now More Than Ever

January 31st, 2017

INFORMATION LITERACY AT UVM

University of Vermont students have more access to information now than they have ever had in their lives. Yet rarely do students come to us with a complex understanding of the information they encounter. As teachers, how do we guide our students through a complicated information landscape and help them become better researchers and more informed writers?

Information literacy is more than a discrete set of skills. Students must understand the context in which information resides. A request to find appropriate information on a topic assumes that students will understand why a certain resource may or may not be appropriate for a given audience. A request to find scholarly articles on a topic assumes that a student understands how scholarly articles are produced and contribute to disciplinary conversations. To be effective teachers of information literacy is to explicitly attend to the contextual questions of “how” and “why” that are so often overlooked. Information literacy is an iterative, progressive, and scaffolded set of skills, abilities, and habits of mind.

INFORMATION LITERACY AT UVM IS:

> taught across all years of the student experience.

> embedded throughout the process of identifying topics, posing questions, reading, research, and synthesizing information to create final products.

> relevant to all disciplines and across all disciplines.

> collaboratively taught in partnership between librarians, faculty, and students.

> assessed through assignments and coursework.

The Association of College and Research Libraries, which guides and supports information literacy in higher education, defines information literacy as: “The set of integrated abilities encompassing the reflective discovery of information, the understanding of how information is produced and valued, and the use of information in creating new knowledge and participating ethically in communities of learning.”

UVM’S INTEGRATED APPROACH TO INFORMATION LITERACY

Expectations for understanding information literacy, conducting research, and writing are different in all disciplines. As learners and practitioners, our understanding of information literacy is constantly developing.

Students learn about information literacy most effectively when it is integrated throughout the curriculum. UVM’s Writing and Information Literacy General Education outcome helps address the teaching and learning of information literacy, and writing through the collaboration of librarians and faculty.

At UVM two initiatives are in place to structure this progression by combining the interrelated practices of writing and information literacy:

Foundational Writing and Information Literacy (FWIL) is designed to meet the needs of first-year students. Courses that fulfill this requirement address information literacy, critical reading, revision, and the ability to adapt one’s writing to a particular audience and situation.

Writing and Information Literacy in the Disciplines (WILD) works with departments to develop a curricular approach to teaching information literacy and writing across a student’s four-year undergraduate experience.

As students move past college they will continue to engage with the concepts of information literacy and use the skills that they have developed at UVM. In many professions, information literacy manifests itself through the use of evidence-based practices that help inform decisions and actions.

INFORMATION LITERACY BEYOND THE CLASSROOM

As citizens in a complex global society, UVM graduates will face demands to critically engage with information, generate knowledge, and solve problems in a variety of personal, professional, and civic contexts. UNESCO’s Alexandria Proclamation on Information Literacy and Lifelong Learning describes information literacy as a basic human right in a digital world that promotes social inclusion. In this larger context, information literacy can be transformative and provides a means for understanding the economic, political, and social forces that impact people’s ability to access information in order to educate themselves and facilitate change.

AN INVITATION TO COLLABORATE

We invite you to work with your subject librarian to integrate and sequence information literacy into your classes and across the curriculum. Contact your librarian to start the conversation.

Librarians can work with you to:

> develop information literacy outcomes for your course.

> support specific assignments through targeted instruction.

> create tutorials and guides to enhance student learning outside the classroom.

> collaborate to create and assess effective assignments.

Continuum of Librarian Support for Information Literacy

> Point-of-need assistance is available through various Ask A Librarian reference services.

> Student research support is available through individual and group consultations with librarians.

> Library instruction is available for individual courses to support specific research needs.

Programmatic information literacy is integrated into the curriculum in cooperation with faculty across campus.

FURTHER READING

> Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education. Association of College and Research Libraries. (2016).

> Ithaka S+R US Faculty Survey 2015.Wolff, C., Rod, A.B., & Schonfeld, R.C. (2016).

> Project Information Literacy. Information School, University of Washington. (2016).

Come Celebrate!

January 19th, 2017

Government Information Open House and Groundhog’s Day Celebration

Thursday February 2nd

11:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.

Government Information, Ground Floor of Bailey/Howe

 

Come celebrate the opening of our brand new Government Information area and Groundhog Day! There will be tours, groundhog themed snacks, prizes, button making and plenty of fun.  We hope to see you there!

 

The World’s Most Mysterious Manuscript

January 13th, 2017

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The World’s Most Mysterious Manuscript: Theories on Its Origin and Use

Presented by Ray Clemens, Curator of Early Books & Manuscripts, Yale University

Wednesday, February 8, 2017, 6:00 pm

Special Collections, Bailey/Howe Library

 

Ray Clemens will talk about the Voynich manuscript, an early 15th-century codex that has been called the world’s most mysterious book. The book was written by hand in an unknown language that no one has yet been able to decipher. Colorful illustrations of unidentifiable plants, zodiac signs, astronomical and cosmological diagrams, and naked women in bathing pools add to the mystery.

Clemens is the editor of The Voynich Manuscript, which was published by the Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library and Yale University Press in 2016. The facsimile volume, with new color photographs of the original manuscript and reproductions of its unusual folded sections, includes six essays that provide historical, cryptographic, forensic, and alchemical perspectives on the manuscript’s origins, owners, and meaning. The manuscript can also be viewed online.

Ray Clemens is the Curator, Early Books & Manuscripts at Yale University’s Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library. He previously served as Acting Director of the Newberry Library’s Center for Renaissance Studies and was an Associate Professor of History at Illinois State University. Clemens is the co-author, with Timothy Graham, of Introduction to Manuscript Studies.  His research interests include medieval hagiography, Renaissance cartography, and the history of the book.

The presentation is sponsored by UVM Special Collections and the College of Arts and Sciences Medieval Studies Lecture Series. It is free and open to the public. Refreshments will be served. For more information, email uvmsc@uvm.edu or call 656-2138.

Visitor parking information.

Illustration credit: Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Yale University

Resources on the “Smallest Freedom Fighter”

January 13th, 2017

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Explore materials celebrating the “Smallest Freedom Fighter,” Sheyann Webb-Christburg, before she comes to present at UVM on Tuesday, January 24, 2017 at 4:00 p.m. in Ira Allen Chapel. Check out our wide selection of books and documentaries detailing various stages of the Civil Rights Movement.

Selma, Lord, Selma: Girlhood Memories of the Civil Rights Movement, by Sheyann Webb-Christburg

Selma’s Peacemaker, by Ralph Schmeltzer

Selma, 1965, by Charles E. Fager

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Selma, Lord, Selma and Eyes on the Prize (DVD 9176 and DVD 5909)

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Explore Kanopy Streaming

January 13th, 2017

Have you heard about UVM Libraries’ video streaming service, Kanopy? With Kanopy, you can watch thousands of films ranging from educational documentaries to cinematic classics – all for free. All you need to do is go to uvm.kanopystreaming.com and follow the prompt to sign in with your netID and password.

Kanopy offers professors an easy and direct way to assign viewings to their students, and also provides an impressive collection of informational documentaries for student research. The service boasts thousands of critically acclaimed foreign, art-house, and classic films; including many from the Criterion Collection.

Below are just a few examples of some fantastic films that you can access today!

 

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Hoop Dreams – Dubbed “one of the best 1,000 films ever” by The New York times, Hoop Dreams chronicles the journeys of two high school students from Chicago as they strive to realize their dreams of becoming professional athletes.

 

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Eraserhead – Take a dive into the surrealist world of David Lynch with his very first film, Eraserhead. Created for a school project at the American Film Institute in 1977, Eraserhead is a bizarre ride through a young man’s attempt at living by the standards of modern society- and falling into a whole other world completely.

 

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Burden of Dreams – Watch as Les Blank follows prominent filmmaker Werner Herzog in his exhaustive plight in the production of his 1982 film, Fitzcarraldo. The documentary follows the cast and crew through the jungles of South America as they attempt to work with the elements – and each other – in order to create a critically-acclaimed film.

 

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The Fear of 13The Fear of 13 is a riveting documentary told by its main protagonist (or potentially antagonist), Nick Yarris – a death row inmate convicted of a brutal rape and murder. Yarris offers his entire autobiographical narrative, all the while leaving the viewer wondering if he is innocent or guilty.

Bailey/Howe Renovation Updates

January 3rd, 2017

Bridge Rendering

In August of 2017, a bridge and library addition will connect a new residence hall to the Bailey/Howe Library’s H. Lawrence McCrorey Gallery. Throughout the spring semester, visitors will see and hear evidence of renovations, though the library will remain open. We’ll provide project updates here (see below) as the work progresses.

Seating in the McCrorey Gallery may be limited at times, but additional study space can be found on the library’s upper floors. The gallery’s multi-cultural art collection will be placed in temporary storage for preservation purposes during the renovation period and will be reinstalled with renewed visibility on completion.

The scope of work will include the construction of a 2,350 square foot addition to the library at the location where the new bridge will enter into the library’s second floor. The elevated bridge is being constructed as part of the First-Year Residence Hall and Dining Project, currently under construction. The new addition will expand student study space in the McCrorey Gallery, as well as provide a new home for the Media Resources service desk and associated programs.

McCrorey Gallery

Project updates:

June 5th

Beginning the morning of June 5th, workers will begin replacing the lights that span the length of the building in front of the Reference Desk. A standard dust control enclosure will be put up, but the Reference Desk will be accessible during scheduled open hours. Painting will also be done on multiple floors during this time. Friday, June 9th will have lower levels of construction noise as it is an orientation day.

May 11th

Expect a higher level of construction noise in the McCrorey Gallery for the next few weeks. A temporary wall will be put up where the new Multimedia lab will be, while the existing sheet rock wall separating the bridge from the library space is removed. Late Monday through Tuesday (5/15-5/16) will be particularly noisy as the construction crew will be grinding off a pour stop between Bailey and Howe.

March 16th

Work on the bridge addition is continuing as scheduled. The design for the new Multi-media lab is in its final stages, and this week construction will begin on the first floor custodial closet, which will be refitted into a family restroom. Patrons can expect some noise in this area.

February 24th

The steel work crew will need to install bolts into the first and second floor where the addition connects to the Bailey side of the library. Patrons should expect drilling from 7:00 am until 10:00 am through the middle of next week.

February 15th

The steel for the bridge addition has been completely installed.  Framing for a new restroom will begin this week, and patrons can expect some early morning noise each day during this process.

February 13th

Bridge construction is continuing on schedule, as interior walls and HVAC systems are being installed.

January 19th – January 21st 

Electricians will be working on switching over the lighting in the Reference area, from fluorescent to energy-efficient LEDs. This project should take about three days.

January 17th – January 27th

During this period, there will be intermittent noise throughout the day as the steel supports are put into place for the bridge. This work will primarily affect the first floor near the McCrorey Gallery and the second floor above the gallery area.

January 2nd

The McCrorey Gallery and surrounding areas are in flux as we complete flooring installation and painting. Many computers are offline at this time. Library faculty and staff can help you to locate available work stations. Printing is available in the library’s Cyber Café.