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Archive for February, 2017

Fair Use Week at UVM Libraries

Friday, February 17th, 2017

UVM Libraries Celebrate Fair Use Week! February 20- 24th

What is Fair Use/Fair Dealing Week?

By Jeanene Light of the Dana Medical Library

Fair Use/Fair Dealing Week is an annual celebration of the important doctrines of fair use in the United States and fair dealing in Canada and other jurisdictions. Under these terms, copyrighted materials are allowed use without permission from the copyright holder under certain circumstances. Fair use is one of the traditional safety valves intended to balance the interests of copyright holders with the public interest in the wider distribution and use of creative works by allowing certain limited uses that might otherwise be considered infringement.

While students, faculty, librarians, journalists, and all users of copyrighted material employ fair use and fair dealing on a daily basis, Fair Use/Fair Dealing Week celebrates this important right.

How do you determine fair use in your research or education?

To determine if a use is “fair use”, there are typically four factors used to evaluate the work in question. Read more and find more information, about these four factors at the University of Texas Libraries website page on Fair Use. Also learn about Fair Use in a Day in the Life of a College Student in the poster below.

Contact Jeanene Light at 656-0521 with questions about Fair Use Week at UVM.

 

Scholarly Metrics – Research by UVM Library Faculty

Tuesday, February 7th, 2017

Hot off the presses! Check out this article on UVM Faculty attitudes towards, and use of scholarly metrics by Bailey/Howe Librarians, Daniel DeSanto and Aaron Nichols. Congratulations Dan and Aaron.

Abstract:

This article presents the results of a faculty survey conducted at the University of Vermont during academic year 2014-2015. The survey asked faculty about: familiarity with scholarly metrics, metric-seeking habits, help-seeking habits, and the role of metrics in their department’s tenure and promotion process. The survey also gathered faculty opinions on how well scholarly metrics reflect the importance of scholarly work and how faculty feel about administrators gathering institutional scholarly metric information. Results point to the necessity of understanding the campus landscape of faculty knowledge, opinion, importance, and use of scholarly metrics before engaging faculty in further discussions about quantifying the impact of their scholarly work.

Citation and link:

DeSanto, D., & Nichols, A. (2017). Scholarly Metrics Baseline: A Survey of Faculty Knowledge, Use, and Opinion about Scholarly Metrics. College & Research Libraries, 78(2), 150–170. https://doi.org/10.5860/crl.78.2.150

Vermont Refugee and Immigrant Stories

Sunday, February 5th, 2017

Here is a list of selected memoirs and biographies from immigrants and refugees who left their homes for safer and better lives in Vermont. (Click on a book’s title to find its call number and location in the library.)

Thank You for My Green Card
In this memoir, Edgar May describes the journey he took to the U.S. from Zurich, Switzerland with his mother and sister, former Vermont Governor Madeleine Kunin, to escape the growing threat of the Holocaust. He writes about his work as a journalist, his service in the U.S. Army, his contributions to the War on Poverty and Special Olympics, and his time in the Vermont House of Representatives (1983-1991) and the Vermont Senate (1984-1990).

First They Killed My Father: A Daughter of Cambodia Remembers
Lucky Child: A Daughter of Cambodia Reunites with the Sister She Left Behind
Lulu in the Sky: A Daughter of Cambodia Finds Love, Healing, and Double Happiness

As a small child, Loung Ung survived Cambodia’s brutal Pol Pot regime, and escaped with a brother to a refugee camp in Thailand before relocating to Vermont as a 10-year old. Her first memoir chronicles that experience. In her second memoir, she writes about the challenges of coping with post-traumatic stress and assimilating into  American life in Vermont, and in alternating chapters writes about the life of her only surviving sister, still in Cambodia. Ung has said that the last volume of her trilogy, “is my journey of going from surviving to thriving… about reconnecting, reclaiming, and rejoicing.” She recounts her efforts to reconcile a past and present through love, activism, and new connections with her family and the country of her birth.

Greek Epic: The Latchis Family & the New England Theater Empire They Built
Greek Epic tells the story of immigrant Demetrios Latsis and the four generations of his family who built a movie theater empire from their home base in Brattleboro.

Refugee: The Ugliest Word, by Aftaba Mezetovic.
Bosnian refugee and Winooski educator Aftaba Mezetovic dedicates her book of poems “to refugees worldwide who have survived war, concentration camps and loss of homeland.”

Lost Generation: The Story of a Sudanese Orphan
Peter Garang Deng moved from a childhood of deprivation in South Sudan to a refugee camp in Kenya before coming to Burlington, Vermont, where he graduated from Champlain College and established a foundation dedicated to educating South Sudanese orphans.

Giving a Lift in Time: A Finnish Immigrant’s Story
Sarcka’s family came to Vermont from Finland in the late 19th-century to work in the marble quarries near Proctor. In 1932, Sarcka and his wife established Spring Lake Ranch, a therapeutic community for people with mental illness, in Cuttingsville.

The Bridging of Two Cultures
The Bridging of Two Cultures is an account of “how one family of French Canadian descent, without compromising its heritage, learned to live and cope in the border village of Derby Line, Vermont.”

Fall in Love with a New Book!

Wednesday, February 1st, 2017

Stop by the first floor New Books section of the Bailey/Howe Library and take a look at some of these gorgeous new art books!

 

Alex Janvier

“Many of his masterpieces involve an eloquent blend of both abstract and representational images with bright, often symbolic colours. As a First Nations person emerging from a history of oppression and many struggles for cultural empowerment, Janvier paints both the challenges and celebrations that he has encountered in his lifetime. Alex proudly credits the beadwork and birch bark basketry of his mother and other relatives as influencing his art.” – from Alex Janvier’s website.

      

 

The Edge of the Earth : Climate Change in Photography and Video

“Increasingly and forebodingly, artists are turning their attention to the subject of climate change, in poignant and often confrontational ways. The Edge of the Earth: Climate Change in Photography and Video features recent and historic work by a range of pioneering and visionary artists from around the world. Photojournalism from the RIC’s famed Black Star Collection is also included, contextualising artistic reflections alongside half a century of historical reportage on the environment.” – from the Ryerson Image Centre website.

      

 

Hieronymus Bosch: Visions of Genius

“Hieronymus Bosch is a world-class artist. His characteristic work full of illusions and hallucinations, bizarre monsters and nightmares, depicts the great themes of his time: temptation, sin and judgement. His work was no less popular after his death and it has inspired innumerable artists to the present day. It also means that Bosch is one of the most important artists of the late Middle Ages. His popularity is, of course, connected with the puzzling character of his images. You remain fascinated.” – from the Bosch Exhibition website at the Noordbrabants Museum.

      

 

Pipilotti Rist: Pixel Forest

“Over the past thirty years, Rist (b. 1962) has achieved international renown as a pioneer of video art and multimedia installations. Her mesmerizing works envelop viewers in sensual, vibrantly colored kaleidoscopic projections that fuse the natural world with the technological sublime. Referring to her art as a “glorification of the wonder of evolution,” Rist maintains a deep sense of curiosity that pervades her explorations of physical and psychological experiences. Her works bring viewers into unexpected, all-consuming encounters with the textures, forms, and functions of the living universe around us.” – from the New Museum’s website on the latest Pipilotti Rist exhibition, Pixel Forest.