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Archive for April, 2014

Exhibit: Working the Landscape

Friday, April 25th, 2014

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Working the Landscape: Vermont’s Fields, Trails & Forests
Exhibit Cases, Bailey/Howe Library Lobby, May 1-August 20, 2014

Vermont landscapes are the outcome of natural processes and human work. While often imagined as an unchanging iconic place, Vermont’s landscapes are the result of diverse and on-going activities. This exhibit focuses on the tools, machines, and practices that have shaped Vermont’s fields, forests and recreational spaces. The exhibit also draws attention to the policies that have influenced how people work the land. Woven through the exhibit are the voices of Vermonters who reflect on what they value most about the state’s working landscape.

“Working the Landscape” is the outcome of a service-learning project for the Bailey/Howe Library conducted by masters students enrolled in UVM’s Food Systems Graduate Program. The students applied their disciplinary perspectives from the fields of anthropology, community development, geography, communications, sociology, food security, animal science, and network analysis in the research for this capstone project.

The students also created an online version of the exhibit.

Free and open to the public. For more information, email uvmsc@uvm.edu or call 656-1493.

Painting: Hay Bales in June, Anna Ayres


Slavery in Early Vermont: Evidence from the Archives

Wednesday, April 2nd, 2014

Special Collections Exhibit April 1-June 30, 2014

Although Article 1 of the Vermont Constitution of 1777 proclaimed that “no male person, born in this country, or brought from over sea, ought to be holden by law, to serve any person, as a servant, slave or apprentice, after he arrives to the age of twenty-one years, nor female, in like manner, after she arrives to the age of eighteen years,” historical evidence indicates that men, women and children were nonetheless held as property for decades after the Constitution was written.

Evidence of slavery in Vermont can be found in bills of sale, account books, newspaper advertisements, census records, government records, and town histories preserved in Vermont libraries and archives. This exhibit includes items from UVM Special Collections that confirm the persistence of slavery in the state during the late eighteenth century.

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“Sold to Col. John Barrett a Negro Girl Named Rose”

 

 

Free and open to the public. For more information, email uvmsc@uvm.edu or call 656-2138.