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Ask a Librarian

Archive for May, 2011

The Way Things Go

Friday, May 6th, 2011

Sean Jack is a senior at UVM studying English and Film. He works in the Media Resources Department of the Bailey Howe Library. We asked him to tell us about one of his favorite films from the library’s collection. Here’s what he had to say:

“Growing up, The Way Things Go was my favorite movie. I realize that this is an odd statement –what child would pick the filming of an art installation as their favorite movie? – but as a child this film captivated me like no other. I’ve always been fascinated by Rube Goldberg machines, purposefully over-complicated devices that perform a simple task through a series of chain reactions. Contraptions like this have been featured in many films, for example, the meal-making machines found in Pee-wee’s Big Adventure, Chitty Chitty Bang Bang, and Back to the Future, but what makes The Way Things Go special is the sheer ingenuity and enormity of the endeavor filmed in the name of art.

“Constructed in an abandoned warehouse, the device, an assemblage of household items like balloons, tires, tea kettles, and ladders, spans an incredible 100 feet of cause and effect style reactions, as one item pushes, spins, or catapults another into action. Peter Fischi and David Weiss, the creators of both the film and the contraption, are known as “the merry pranksters of contemporary art” (New York Times), an apt moniker considering the jovial, childlike wonderment which I feel the film espouses.

The Way Things Go is very much about motion, and viewing the film is akin to watching a well executed dance. Each stage of the contraption has its own specific motion, however the one thing each element has in common is that every movement is delicately deliberate. Whether it’s the topsy-turvy roll of a barrel as it saunters its way up a ramp or the haunting swing of a pendulum caught aflame, each is equal parts wonderful and beautiful.”

 

Meet the Models

Friday, May 6th, 2011

Over the last four years the UVM Libraries has been lucky to work with a fabulous group of models who have helped us to promote library services – especially our Ask a Librarian service.

A large number of models are graduating this semester. We wanted to take a moment to thank them for being so amazing, funny, smart and goofy, and give them a chance to reflect on being a model, the libraries, and their time at UVM.

We’ll miss seeing you all on campus and wish you the best for the future!

xx

xxx Name: Amanda Fox (front)

Major: Global Studies

What are you doing after graduation?

I am going to be working this summer in Burlington — part time babysitting for an awesome family and part time as an Artist’s Assistant. I will also to continue to volunteer at the Vermont Worker’s Center and the Healthcare is a Human Right Campaign, play frisbee, and generally chill. After that — who knows? The world is my oyster!

Do you have any thoughts or memories about being a model for the Ask Campaign  that you’d like to share?

It’s always fun when someone wonders why they recognize me but can’t quite place it…till they realize it’s cuz I’ve been scarily smiling down at them in the Cyber Cafe, motivating them to work in the wee hours of the night.

Do you have any thoughts or memories about the UVM Libraries that you’d like to share?

I always run into the most people I know in the lib and thus tend not to be productive there. But I will miss my iso-desk: first floor, by the comfy chairs, the one right by the plugs. If I get that seat, I can post up for hours. I have also, unfortunately, slept in the dear old Bailey/Howe. I think I can count on one hand the amount of times I’ve been up to the second or third floor — my essence is too loud.

What’s your best memory of UVM?

PG Version: the transition to springtime, when it’s warm enough to sit on the steps of the library and hang out between classes or lay out on the green.

xx

Name: Briana Mills

Major: Animal Science

What are you doing after graduation?

Enjoying Burlington for a part of the summer and then going to Brazil.

Do you have any thoughts or memories about the UVM Libraries that you’d like to share?

I really appreciate the efforts of the staff at UVM Libraries make to help familiarize students with their services.

What’s your best memory of UVM?

I will always remember UVM for the beauty of both the immediate and surrounding area as well as the kindness of the people.

xx

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Name: Jen Lahr

Major: Athletic Training

What are you doing after graduation?

Finding work somewhere.

What’s your best memory of UVM?

My best memory at UVM was when both basketball teams won the conference.

Name: Kathleen Buckley

Major: Secondary Education

What are you doing after graduation?

I am currently looking for a job teaching high school social studies!

Do you have any thoughts or memories about being a model for the Ask Campaign  that you’d like to share?

I loved seeing the poses that the other models being photographed before me were doing. There were a lot of creative students on campus. The atmosphere on campus that day was very light and playful, so it was lots of fun.

Do you have any thoughts or memories about the UVM Libraries that you’d like to share?

My clearest memories at Bailey/Howe always involved stealthily waiting for enough chairs on the ground floor to open up doing end-of-term group project meetings, and then pouncing on them once the previous occupant had left. I also remember the librarians being very helpful whenever I got lost looking for a seemingly obscure book on the third floor.

xx

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Name: Peter Donaghy

Major: Film & Television Studies and Studio Art

What are you doing after graduation?

Moving to LA to try to get involved with some filming.

Do you have any thoughts or memories about the UVM Libraries that you’d like to share?

The third floor is pretty creepy.

What’s your best memory of UVM?

The snow…

Name: Alejandra Herrera

Major: Biology and Latin American Studies

What are you doing after graduation?

Medical school.

Do you have any thoughts or memories about being a model for the Ask Campaign  that you’d like to share?

Before I had my picture taken I spilled coffee all over my pants.

Do you have any thoughts or memories about the UVM Libraries that you’d like to share?

I worked at the library since 2007 and I have fond memories of helping people find research materials and enabling them to start their scholastic endeavors.

What’s your best memory of UVM?

Having my chemistry experiment explode on me, enjoying sunsets on Williams’ fire escape, and being able to grow as an individual along the side of my friends .

xx

Name: Maddie Brown (center)

Major: Environmental Studies and Math

What are you doing after graduation?

I am moving to Copenhagen, Denmark to work for the study abroad program I went to called the Danish Institute for Study Abroad.

Do you have any thoughts or memories about being a model for the Ask Campaign  that you’d like to share?

I remember it was a great study break with my friends and a stress reliever.

What’s your best memory of UVM?

My best memory of UVM is the first sunny and warm day each year and seeing so many students on the green simply enjoying life.

xx



Ethan Allen: His Life and Times–Lecture

Thursday, May 5th, 2011



Lecture and Book Signing
Thursday, June 16, 2011 at 6:00 pm

Special Collections Reading Room, Bailey/Howe Library

Willard Sterne Randall, professor of history at Champlain College, will talk about Ethan Allen, the subject of his latest book. Ethan Allen: His Life and Times is the first new biography of the legendary Vermonter in 50 years, and according to historian John Ferling, “Randall has stripped away the myths to provide as accurate an account of Allen’s life as will ever be written.”  Randall’s Ethan Allen emerges as both a public-spirited leader and a self-interested individual. As Randall examines Allen’s movement from modest origins in Connecticut to Revolutionary War firebrand, he relies on much new source material, particularly about Allen’s experience as a British prisoner of war.

Randall is the author of twelve books, including six biographies and two biographical readers. A former investigative reporter, he received the National Magazine Award for Public Service from Columbia Graduate School of Journalism, the Hillman Prize, the Loeb Award and three Pulitzer Prize nominations during his seventeen-year journalism career in Philadelphia. After graduate studies in history at Princeton University, he turned to writing biographies, which have also garnered three Pulitzer nominations. A contributing editor to American Heritage Magazine and to MHQ: The Quarterly Journal of Military History, he regularly reviews biographies for New York Newsday, Philadelphia Inquirer, Boston Globe and the Journal of American History.

The lecture is free and open to the public.

For more information about the event, call 656-2138 or email uvmsc@uvm.edu

Maps and directions

Parking information

LRA Reading Room Closed May 9-30

Thursday, May 5th, 2011

The Library Research Annex reading room will be closed beginning Monday, May 9, 2011. It will reopen on Tuesday, May 31 at 1:00 pm.

For access to Archives and Special Collections materials, email uvmsc@uvm.edu. For access to Bailey/Howe and Dana Medical Library books and journals, please request retrieval through the Libraries web page.

Ambrose Video 2.0

Tuesday, May 3rd, 2011

The UVM Libraries currently has a trial of Ambrose Video 2.0. This streaming video collection includes videos on a wide range of subjects including the life and physical sciences, social sciences and culture, the arts, religion, and history. Particular highlights include: the complete BBC Shakespeare, The Living Planet, The Long Search, and The Shock of the New. Each program is broken into segments that can be linked to individually.

All videos are in Flash format and most include closed captioning.

Access all titles now!

This trial end on June 1, 2011

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