Hours Today: 10/25/16
8 am - Midnight | see all hours

Ask a Librarian

Archive for the ‘What’s New’ Category

All-Night Study is Open at the Bailey/Howe

Wednesday, October 5th, 2016

File_001 (4)

The Bailey/Howe Library’s ‘All-Night Study’ is open and ready for all of your late night studying and printing needs. This space is available to UVM affiliates between midnight and 8 am on Sunday – Thursday evenings. Just remember to bring your UVM ID card to access the Cyber Cafe space. For all holiday and break-related hours changes, please check the UVM Libraries’ website: Library Hours.

 11061762_10153066610951466_2351091309322135775_n  10480227_10152437683691466_5698589560478504633_n


New Books at the Bailey/Howe

Monday, October 3rd, 2016

Get ready for the Halloween season with some *spooky* reads! These works can be found on our New Book shelf in Bailey/Howe, an ever-rotating sampling of things we’re adding to our collection. You can also review all our newest books online, and subscribe via RSS to receive alerts about acquisitions, by discipline.


Monstrous Progeny: A History of the Frankenstein Narratives by Prof. Lester D. Friedman & Prof. Allison B. Kavey

Monstrous Progeny takes readers on a fascinating exploration of the Frankenstein family tree, tracing the literary and intellectual roots of Shelley’s novel from the sixteenth century and analyzing the evolution of the book’s figures and themes into modern productions that range from children’s cartoons to pornography. Along the way, media scholar Lester D. Friedman and historian Allison B. Kavey examine the adaptation and evolution of Victor Frankenstein and his monster across different genres and in different eras. In doing so, they demonstrate how Shelley’s tale and its characters continue to provide crucial reference points for current debates about bioethics, artificial intelligence, cyborg lifeforms, and the limits of scientific progress.

Blending an extensive historical overview with a detailed analysis of key texts, the authors reveal how the Frankenstein legacy arose from a series of fluid intellectual contexts and continues to pulsate through an extraordinary body of media products. Both thought-provoking and entertaining,Monstrous Progeny offers a lively look at an undying and significant cultural phenomenon.



Witchcraft and Folk Belief in the Age of Enlightenment by Lizanne Henderson

Taking an interdisciplinary perspective, Witchcraft and Folk Belief in the Age of Enlightenment represents the first in-depth investigation of Scottish witchcraft and witch belief post-1662, the period of supposed decline of such beliefs, an age which has been referred to as the ‘long eighteenth century’, coinciding with the Scottish Enlightenment. The late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries were undoubtedly a period of transition and redefinition of what constituted the supernatural, at the interface between folk belief and the philosophies of the learned. For the latter the eradication of such beliefs equated with progress and civilization but for others, such as the devout, witch belief was a matter of faith, such that fear and dread of witches and their craft lasted well beyond the era of the major witch-hunts. This study seeks to illuminate the distinctiveness of the Scottish experience, to assess the impact of enlightenment thought upon witch belief, and to understand how these beliefs operated across all levels of Scottish society.



Seven Skeletons by Lydia Pyne

Over the last century, the search for human ancestors has spanned four continents and resulted in the discovery of hundreds of fossils. While most of these discoveries live quietly in museum collections, there are a few that have become world-renowned celebrity personas—ambassadors of science that speak to public audiences. In Seven Skeletons, historian of science Lydia Pyne explores how seven such famous fossils of our ancestors have the social cachet they enjoy today.

Drawing from archives, museums, and interviews, Pyne builds a cultural history for each celebrity fossil—from its discovery to its afterlife in museum exhibits to its legacy in popular culture. These seven include the three-foot tall “hobbit” from Flores, the Neanderthal of La Chapelle, the Taung Child, the Piltdown Man hoax, Peking Man, Australopithecus sediba, and Lucy—each embraced and celebrated by generations, and vivid examples of how discoveries of how our ancestors have been received, remembered, and immortalized.



Murder, Inc. and the Moral Life by Robert Weldon Whalen

The Murder, Inc., story is as much a tale of morality as it is a gangster history, and Murder, Inc., and the Moral Life by Robert Whalen meshes both topics clearly and meticulously, relating the gangster phenomenon to modern moral theory. Each chapter covers an aspect of the Murder, Inc., case and reflects on its ethical elements and consequences. Whalen delves into the background of the criminals involved, their motives, and the violent death that surrounded them; New York City’s immigrant gang culture and its role as “Gangster City”; fiery politicians Fiorello La Guardia and Thomas E. Dewey and the choices they made to clean up the city; and the role of the gangster in popular culture and how it relates to “real life.” Whalen puts a fresh spin on the two topics, providing a vivid narrative with both historical and moral perspective.



Check out our Instagram!

Wednesday, September 7th, 2016

Follow @uvmlibraries on Instagram today! For behind-scenes glimpses at library life, interesting reads, selections from the free book shelf, libraries’ news and events, and much more- check out our Instagram!

UVM Libraries on Instagram

IMG_0749  IMG_0706

IMG_0750  IMG_0779

Also, keep an eye out for our always-popular Halloween Costume Contest!

IMG_0658 IMG_0662

IMG_0665 IMG_0656

Restrooms for all!

Friday, August 26th, 2016

Restroom signage

The UVM Libraries are proud to be introducing some new non gender-segregated restrooms (also sometimes known as “all-gender,” “gender-neutral,” or “gender-inclusive” restrooms) as we start the fall 2016 semester.

These restrooms are the result of student demand, a campus-wide effort to expand access to restrooms that aren’t segregated by gender, and the library’s long-standing commitment to ensuring that all people have equitable access to information.

A few of the benefits of non gender-segregated restrooms are:

  • Safer spaces for trans and gender non-conforming library users
  • Less waiting for restroom availability based on gender
  • Easier access for caretakers of different gender presentations
  • Easier access for custodial staff

We’re also proud to uphold guidelines from the Department of Justice ensuring that trans students can use the restroom that’s consistent with their gender identity.

Basically, you get to choose what’s right for you!

You can find new non gender-segregated restrooms on the second and third floors of Bailey/Howe, near the elevators at the top of the main stairway (Rooms 251 & 252; 351 & 352). We’re currently completing Americans with Disabilities Act-compliant renovations to room 252 to increase accessibility.

We also have a pre-existing, non gender-segregated restroom on the ground floor (Room 026). To find it turn right at Media Services and follow signs for Acquisitions. It’s across from Acquisitions and next to the Free Book shelf.

To learn more about the importance of non gender-segregated restrooms and their locations on campus, please see: http://www.uvm.edu/~lgbtqa/?Page=transinfo.html&SM=programsmenu.html

Government Documents closing through October of 2016

Wednesday, April 13th, 2016


The Government Information area will be closed for construction through October. Materials will be temporarily stored off-site. Patrons needing to use government publications over the summer should contact Government Information personnel (govdocs@uvm.edu, 656-2542).

If needs for government publications arise, we will do our best to obtain the materials. Staff will be available throughout the construction period.