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EndNote & Zotero Workshops for Spring

Monday, January 26th, 2015

workshoppictureCome learn about tools that can help you to keep track of research materials, collaborate with classmates and colleagues, take notes, format citations, and create bibliographies for papers in a variety of styles.  All workshops are free and open to UVM students, faculty, and staff.  No registration is required.

Introduction to Zotero

Learn how to keep track of research materials, organize note-taking, and format citations and bibliographies using this easy-to-master, open-source solution.

Location:  Bailey/Howe Library Classroom (Room 123)

Facilitators:  Daisy Benson, Emily Crist, Daniel DeSanto, & Graham Sherriff

  • January 28  (Wednesday) noon-1:00pm
  • February 5  (Thursday) 1:00-2:00pm
  • February 13  (Friday) 3:00-4:00pm
  • March 11  (Wednesday) 4:00-5:00pm
  • March 18  (Wednesday) 2:00-3:00pm
  • March 25  (Wednesday) 4:00-5:00pm
  • March 27 (Friday) 2:00-3:00pm
  • April 2  (Thursday) 3:00-4:00pm

Contact Daisy Benson (daisy.benson@uvm.edu) to arrange for a customized workshop on Zotero for your class, lab, or other group.

EndNote workshops

Learn how to use EndNote (a software program) to keep track of research information, organize notes, and insert citations into your papers.

Location:  Bailey/Howe Classroom (Room 123)

Facilitators:  Laurie Kutner

  • February 19  (Thursday) 4:00-5:00pm
  • March 17  (Tuesdayday) 4:00-5:00pm
  • April 8  (Wednesday) 4:00-5:00pm

Additional EndNote workshops can be scheduled upon request.  Send requests to Laurie Kutner (laurie.kutner@uvm.edu).

 

In Their Own Words

Friday, January 9th, 2015

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In Their Own Words: Stories from Refugees Settled in Vermont
Jan. 11-May 20, 2015
Bailey/Howe Library Lobby

Pairing photographs and interview excerpts, the spring semester exhibit in the Bailey/Howe Library lobby profiles the experience of families and individuals whose lives have been disrupted by warfare, political violence, or discrimination and who came to Vermont as refugees. They hail from places as diverse as Somalia, Bosnia, Burundi, Rwanda, Vietnam, Sudan, and Uzbekistan, and they share the common challenge of starting new lives in a very different cultural setting.

The exhibit consists of ten groups of images, each featuring a different family or individual. The focal point of each set is a photographic portrait which is accompanied by interview text presenting an important aspect of this person’s experience. Two additional photographs—the joint creation of photographer and subject—add another layer of visual information to the story.

The project began when photographer Ned Castle met two brothers from Rwanda. As Ned’s friendship with these young men deepened, he was drawn into their stories and created a pairing of image and text to honor them. Working with the Vermont Refugee Resettlement Program and the Association of Africans Living in Vermont, Ned’s network of connections expanded, and the project grew from there.

In 2007, Ned compiled a series of photographs as well as stories that were recorded, then transcribed and edited with the help of the contributors. The narratives offer a glimpse into the remarkable diversity of life experiences that refugees bring to our community. The photos and the full stories are  available in an online book.

In Their Own Voices is a project of the Vision and Voice Documentary Workspace at the Vermont Folklife Center. The center, through its research and educational outreach programs, seeks to open a window into the social and cultural fabric of Vermont.

The project was funded with support from The Bay and Paul Foundations, the Vermont Arts Council, and the National Endowment for the Arts.

The exhibit is free and open to the public.

7 Tips to Get the Most Out of Your Library

Friday, December 19th, 2014

We asked library faculty and staff for their top tips and here’s what they told us:

#1 ASK for help

Stop by the reference desks in Bailey/Howe and Dana Medical Library, email a question, chat, text, call or make an appointment with a subject specialist in your area.

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#2 Use subject guides

Our team has created guides in each subject area to help you get started with the absolute best sources – from online databases to books to websites.

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#3 Borrow stuff

Our fabulous interlibrary loan team will borrow anything we don’t own from another library and get it to you as quickly as possible.

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#4 Kick back with culture

Bailey/Howe Library’s Media Resources is home to thousands of CDs and DVDs. De-stress with popular TV series and find fantastic documentaries to support your research.

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#5 Search everything with CATQuest

Our online catalog let’s you search books, articles and items at other libraries, all at once.

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#6 Study in teams

Our popular group study rooms allow two or more students to study together or work on group projects.

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#7 Use one-of-a-kind digital collections

Check out our unique digital collections of historic images and documents and UVM’s student and faculty research.

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New Books for a New Year

Friday, December 19th, 2014

These works can be found on our New Book shelf in Bailey/Howe, an ever-rotating sampling of things we’re adding to our collection. You can also review all our newest books online, and subscribe via RSS to receive alerts about acquisitions, by discipline.

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Gil Scott-Heron: Pieces of a Man by Marcus Baram

“Best known for his ingenious, cutting, and satiric 1970 song, ‘The Revolution Will Not Be Televised,’ Scott-Heron (1949–2011) never received full recognition for his brilliant writing across many genres, including poetry and fiction, and his canny weaving of black history into his volatile moment. In this straightforward, honest book, journalist Baram draws a poignant portrait, if somewhat fawning, of the artist as a black man struggling to make sense of his culture from the 1960s to his death.” –Publishers Weekly

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Behold the Proverbs of a People: Proverbial Wisdon in Culture, Literature and Politics by Wolfgang Mieder

“Noted scholar Wolfgang Mieder shows that proverbs matter in culture, literature, and politics. Proverbs remain part and parcel of oral and written communication, and, he demonstrates, they deserve to be studied from a range of viewpoints… Wolfgang Mieder, Williston, Vermont, is University Distinguished Professor of German and Folklore at the University of Vermont. He has published well over one hundred books and is the leading expert on proverbs in the world.” –Publisher’s information

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A Muse and a Maze: Writing as Puzzle, Mystery and Magic by Peter Turchi

“Turchi follows up Maps of the Imagination, which connected writing and cartography, by exploring the links between artistic creation and puzzle making and solving. While presenting different kinds of puzzles–from disappearing magic tricks to elaborate labyrinths–Turchi shows how writer and magician alike use self-presentation and withheld information to transport us to a ‘state of wonder’ and ‘invite us to think about something…worthy of extended consideration.’” –Publishers Weekly

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Ghosts: A Natural History: 500 Years of Searching for Proof by Roger Clarke

“Close to the end of Roger Clarke’s Ghosts: A Natural History, the author mentions ‘silent phone calls from people who have been buried with their phone in their coffin.’ Who are these people? He doesn’t say, but he claims there’s a whole genre of ‘apparently true’ mobile phone ghost stories, including ‘texts from the dead.’ There are even haunted spell-checks. When the name ‘Prudentia’ was highlighted on a document during a 1998 investigation in Britain, the alternative spellings that reportedly came up were ‘dead,’ ‘buried’ and ‘cellar.’” – New York Times

Bailey/Howe Winter Break Hours

Friday, December 12th, 2014

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Bailey/Howe Library has switched to winter break hours. Beginning December 15, 2014 through January 9, 2015, the Library will be open 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. During that period the Bailey/Howe Library will be closed on Saturday and Sunday. Keep reading for the exceptions.


Exceptions:
Wednesday-Friday, December 25-26, 2014 — CLOSED
Monday-Friday, December 29, 2014-January 2, 2015 — CLOSED

Also, check the Libraries’ calendar for any changes. Happy Holidays!

Fundamentals of Trademarks

Tuesday, November 18th, 2014

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Wednesday, Nov. 19, 9:30-11
Media Projection Room, Bailey/Howe Library, UVM

Craig Morris, managing attorney for trademark educational outreach in the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, will talk about the fundamentals of trademarks. Participants will learn how trademarks, copyrights, patents, domain names, and business name regulations differ; why it’s important for a new business to select a trademark that is both federally registrable and legally protectable; what can happen if a another trademark owner believes it has a stronger rights in a mark and issues a cease-and-desist letter; information on the USPTO federal registration process and how to avoid scam registration fees.

For more information, contact Scott Schaffer, scott.schaffer@uvm.edu, 802-656-2503.

Jurassic Park (1993) DVD 2180

Tuesday, November 11th, 2014

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Steven Spielberg’s Jurassic Park (1993) is known as a classic of its era, and like most true classics, at least in my opinion, this movie has aged like bourbon. Rather than being the slick and new film it was in 1993, Jurassic Park is now a fine example of a smoky yet smooth experience for any evening.
As a quick summary, the film is about a team of scientists being brought of their own free will to a wildlife preserve off the coast of Costa Rica. The island has had its fauna reworked to include an entire ecosystem of, you guessed it, dinosaurs. From Triceratops to Velociraptors, the island’s purpose is to be a zoo with a view into the past. However, first it needs to be cleared by a team of scientists to legitimize the safety of the park. The cast stars Sam Neill, Laura Dern, Jeff Goldblum, Richard Attenborough and Samuel L. Jackson.
The main draw nowadays with Jurassic Park is how beautifully filmed it is. It can even stand today with the best of any recent film, often even surpassing them. The dinosaurs look amazing for 1993, so there’s no need to worry about 1963 Godzilla-esque puppeteer work, these dinos still have bite. The score was beautifully crafted by none other than John Williams and the main theme brings a bubbling sense of adventure inside any viewer. In addition, the film is also extremely memorable for all of the right reasons, including its ability to be so easily empathized with. Who couldn’t forget the T-Rex scene feeding the Brontosaurus, or even how real Jeff Goldblum looks?
Jurassic Park stands out from your typical fantasy story due to the fact that the film isn’t seated in the presence of dinosaurs, but rather in the reactions of the people who are genuinely surprised to be seeing them. Unlike its so-so subsequent sequels, the original Jurassic Park nails the ‘giant monster’ subgenre (not that the dinosaurs are typical ‘monsters’) by keeping the spotlight on the very fearful actors. The name might be Jurassic Park, but the film focuses on the human element, and is a huge recommendation for anyone who is looking for the perfect film and a bowl of popcorn to pair it with.

 

Persistent Link

Vermont as Genius Loci: The Marshes and UVM

Sunday, October 26th, 2014

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David Lowenthal
Professor Emeritus of Geography, University College London

Wednesday, November 19, 2014, 6:00 p.m.
North Lounge, Billings Library

David Lowenthal, Professor Emeritus of Geography at University College London, will present “Vermont as Genius Loci: The Marshes and UVM.” Conservation pioneer George Perkins Marsh and his first cousin James Marsh, the fifth president of the University of Vermont, made major contributions to scholarly thought in the nineteenth century. As we celebrate the 150th  anniversary of the publication of George Perkins Marsh’s seminal work, Man and Nature, it is a fitting occasion to examine the legacy of the Marsh cousins and their impact on the University of Vermont.

David Lowenthal is the author of George Perkins Marsh: Prophet of Conservation (2000), The Past is a Foreign Country (1985), The Heritage Crusade and the Spoils of History (1996), and The Nature of Cultural Heritage and the Culture of National Heritage (2005).

The event is free and open to the public. Reception to follow immediately after the lecture. For more information, email uvmsc@uvm.edu or call 656-2138. Professor Lowenthal’s presentation is sponsored by the Provost’s Office, UVM Special Collections, the Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources, the College of Arts and Sciences, the Humanities Center, and the Department of Geography.

Read about James Marsh and Vermont Transcendentalism, a movement which affected the curriculum at UVM and the development of modern higher education, in Samantha Harvey’s Transatlantic Transcendentalism.  Learn more about George Perkins Marsh at the George Perkins Marsh Online Research Center.

House (1977) – DVD 10694

Wednesday, October 22nd, 2014

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Nobuhiko Obayashi’s House (1977) is hard to explain in words. On its surface it appears to be a horror film, but at its heart it’s a slapstick comedy, a coming-of-age story, a tale about the bitterness of war, and an experimental avant-garde art film, all rolled into one.

House has been one of my all-time favorite films since I saw it during my senior year of high school, watching it in a dark basement with a friend, neither of us having any idea what we were getting into. That is probably the best way to experience House: in a dark corner of your home, knowing as little about what you’re getting into as possible, with someone there with you. Each of these is an important factor. The first keeps you isolated, so you can totally immerse yourself in the movie. The second preserves the many surprises that the film has in store. And the third, the most necessary, is so you have someone to turn to make sure you really did see what you think you saw.

A group of schoolgirls, Gorgeous, Fantasy, Prof, Melody, Kung Fu, Mac, and Sweet, take a trip to visit Gorgeous’ aunt for their summer vacation. But Gorgeous has an ulterior motive for suggesting the trip: her widower father is newly engaged and Gorgeous isn’t very happy about it. Things take a strange turn that even Gorgeous didn’t expect, however, as strange supernatural events start to take place, and her aunt’s home changes from a dream vacation to a haunted nightmare.
House is a film that refuses to let itself be restricted by traditional cinematic techniques, whether in framing, editing or sound design. It doesn’t try to act like it has some obligation to be realistic when it is already a fantastical story of ghosts and “witch cats”. And there isn’t an ounce of irony or self-mockery to be found. House is absolutely earnest about being totally crazy and that level of dedication and heart makes me love it more than any elaborate plot or incredible performance could. This is a movie that eschews doing things a specific way just because that’s how it’s traditionally done and instead tries as many new and different things as possible, creating something truly original and new. To quote Chuck Stephen’s essay on the film, it is “eye-poppingly demented, jaw-droppingly inventive”, a film “that must be seen to be believed, and then seen again to believe that you really did see what you think you saw.” Compared to anything of its time, or even of today, House is an utterly unique experience, and one I’d recommend to anyone looking for a good time.

Persistent Link

New Digital Collections Available

Tuesday, October 7th, 2014

The Center for Digital Initiatives launched two new collections this semester: University of Vermont Alumni Publications and Civil War Broadsides and Ephemera.

University of Vermont Alumni Publications

Since 1905, the University of Vermont has regularly published newsletters and magazines for its alumni. The alumni publications are a valuable source of information about the institution and UVM students, faculty, and staff. The publications document activities and accomplishments, curriculum developments, and campus expansion and building construction. They include feature articles on diverse topics, statistical and financial reports, interviews, photographs, and alumni news.

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Civil War Broadsides and Ephemera

The Civil War Broadsides and Ephemera Collection contains items from the Wilbur Collection of Vermontiana that were printed and circulated from 1861 to 1865. Most of the items are related to the war, while a small number are related to Vermont’s efforts to organize and train the state militia after the war. The collection features proclamations, orders and announcements about the state’s military operations, including recruitment, enrollment, supplies, and equipment. It also includes announcements about the progress of the war and President Lincoln’s death. One of the most unusual items is a broadside alerting the public to the theft of U.S. Treasury notes and bonds stolen from a St. Albans, Vermont bank by Confederate raiders in October 1864. Additional items will be added to this collection in the future.

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