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Fundamentals of Trademarks

Tuesday, November 18th, 2014

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Wednesday, Nov. 19, 9:30-11
Media Projection Room, Bailey/Howe Library, UVM

Craig Morris, managing attorney for trademark educational outreach in the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, will talk about the fundamentals of trademarks. Participants will learn how trademarks, copyrights, patents, domain names, and business name regulations differ; why it’s important for a new business to select a trademark that is both federally registrable and legally protectable; what can happen if a another trademark owner believes it has a stronger rights in a mark and issues a cease-and-desist letter; information on the USPTO federal registration process and how to avoid scam registration fees.

For more information, contact Scott Schaffer, scott.schaffer@uvm.edu, 802-656-2503.

Vermont as Genius Loci: The Marshes and UVM

Sunday, October 26th, 2014

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David Lowenthal
Professor Emeritus of Geography, University College London

Wednesday, November 19, 2014, 6:00 p.m.
North Lounge, Billings Library

David Lowenthal, Professor Emeritus of Geography at University College London, will present “Vermont as Genius Loci: The Marshes and UVM.” Conservation pioneer George Perkins Marsh and his first cousin James Marsh, the fifth president of the University of Vermont, made major contributions to scholarly thought in the nineteenth century. As we celebrate the 150th  anniversary of the publication of George Perkins Marsh’s seminal work, Man and Nature, it is a fitting occasion to examine the legacy of the Marsh cousins and their impact on the University of Vermont.

David Lowenthal is the author of George Perkins Marsh: Prophet of Conservation (2000), The Past is a Foreign Country (1985), The Heritage Crusade and the Spoils of History (1996), and The Nature of Cultural Heritage and the Culture of National Heritage (2005).

The event is free and open to the public. Reception to follow immediately after the lecture. For more information, email uvmsc@uvm.edu or call 656-2138. Professor Lowenthal’s presentation is sponsored by the Provost’s Office, UVM Special Collections, the Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources, the College of Arts and Sciences, the Humanities Center, and the Department of Geography.

Read about James Marsh and Vermont Transcendentalism, a movement which affected the curriculum at UVM and the development of modern higher education, in Samantha Harvey’s Transatlantic Transcendentalism.  Learn more about George Perkins Marsh at the George Perkins Marsh Online Research Center.

House (1977) – DVD 10694

Wednesday, October 22nd, 2014

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Nobuhiko Obayashi’s House (1977) is hard to explain in words. On its surface it appears to be a horror film, but at its heart it’s a slapstick comedy, a coming-of-age story, a tale about the bitterness of war, and an experimental avant-garde art film, all rolled into one.

House has been one of my all-time favorite films since I saw it during my senior year of high school, watching it in a dark basement with a friend, neither of us having any idea what we were getting into. That is probably the best way to experience House: in a dark corner of your home, knowing as little about what you’re getting into as possible, with someone there with you. Each of these is an important factor. The first keeps you isolated, so you can totally immerse yourself in the movie. The second preserves the many surprises that the film has in store. And the third, the most necessary, is so you have someone to turn to make sure you really did see what you think you saw.

A group of schoolgirls, Gorgeous, Fantasy, Prof, Melody, Kung Fu, Mac, and Sweet, take a trip to visit Gorgeous’ aunt for their summer vacation. But Gorgeous has an ulterior motive for suggesting the trip: her widower father is newly engaged and Gorgeous isn’t very happy about it. Things take a strange turn that even Gorgeous didn’t expect, however, as strange supernatural events start to take place, and her aunt’s home changes from a dream vacation to a haunted nightmare.
House is a film that refuses to let itself be restricted by traditional cinematic techniques, whether in framing, editing or sound design. It doesn’t try to act like it has some obligation to be realistic when it is already a fantastical story of ghosts and “witch cats”. And there isn’t an ounce of irony or self-mockery to be found. House is absolutely earnest about being totally crazy and that level of dedication and heart makes me love it more than any elaborate plot or incredible performance could. This is a movie that eschews doing things a specific way just because that’s how it’s traditionally done and instead tries as many new and different things as possible, creating something truly original and new. To quote Chuck Stephen’s essay on the film, it is “eye-poppingly demented, jaw-droppingly inventive”, a film “that must be seen to be believed, and then seen again to believe that you really did see what you think you saw.” Compared to anything of its time, or even of today, House is an utterly unique experience, and one I’d recommend to anyone looking for a good time.

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Exhibit Tour on October 8

Tuesday, September 30th, 2014

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Guided Tour of Geographies: New England Book Work Exhibit
Wednesday, October 8, 2014, 6:30-7:30 pm.
Meet in Special Collections, Bailey/Howe Library

On Wednesday, October 8, 2014 at 6:30, join exhibitors Deborah Howe and Stephanie Wolff for a guided tour of the exhibit Geographies: New England Book Work currently on display at UVM’s Bailey/Howe Library. They will discuss the creation of their own books in the show, methods of construction used by other exhibitors, and contemporary bookbinding and book arts. This exhibition contains a variety of artist books, bindings, and manuscript books on the theme “New England” created by members of the Guild of Book Workers’ New England Chapter.

Deborah Howe is the Collections Conservator and a Book Arts Instructor at Dartmouth College Library, and board member of the Morgan Conservatory in Cleveland, Ohio. Stephanie Wolff is an artist, hand bookbinder, and book conservator. She teaches book arts to students of all ages, including at Dartmouth College Library’s Book Arts Workshop.

The Guild of Book Workers, a national organization founded in 1906, brings together people interested in all the book arts, including bookbinding, book conservation, calligraphy, decorative paper, papermaking, and printing. For more information visit negbw.wordpress.com and www.guildofbookworkers.org.

Free and open to the public. For more information, email uvmsc@uvm.edu or call 656-2138.

Inventing Ethan Allen–Sept. 4 in Special Collections

Wednesday, August 6th, 2014

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Thursday, September 4, 5:30 pm
Special Collections Reading Room
Bailey/Howe Library, University of Vermont

Ethan Allen has legendary status in Vermont and beyond. Historians John Duffy and H. Nicholas Muller III explore the man and the myths about him in their fascinating new book, Inventing Ethan Allen. Join Duffy and Muller on September 4 as they explain how they unraveled a complicated web of memories, myths and history to understand the story of Ethan Allen in the context of Vermont’s history.

John Duffy is emeritus professor of English and the humanities at Johnson State College. He edited Ethan Allen and his Kin (1998) and The Vermont Encyclopedia (2003) and has written many articles on Vermont topics. H. Nicholas Muller III taught history at the University of Vermont, was president of Colby-Sawyer College, director of the Wisconsin Historical Society, and president of the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation. He has published widely on Vermont history.

Find a copy of Inventing Ethan Allen in Bailey/Howe Library on the second floor or in Special Collections. The call number is E207 .A4 D84 2014.

Free and open to the public. For more information, email uvmsc@uvm.edu or call 656-2138.

 

Prospect Fellows Working at Bailey/Howe July 14-18

Wednesday, July 16th, 2014

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The third cohort of Prospect Fellows have gathered at Bailey/Howe this week to study the Prospect Archive of Children’s Work. Their residency is supported by the Prospect School and Center for Education and Research Fund, managed by UVM Special Collections.

The Prospect School in North Bennington, Vermont developed a methodology that allowed teachers to document children’s growth and learning. Prospect sponsored summer institutes, seminars and conferences for teachers who spread the school’s descriptive processes well beyond the North Bennington campus. In 2006, UVM Special Collections received the Prospect Archives as well as funds to support annual fellowships that encourage teachers to continue learning from the Prospect experience.

This year’s Practitioner Fellows include Kerry Elson, a teacher at the Weekday School at New York City’s  Riverside Church; Felicia Black, a professor at LIU Brooklyn; Caitlin Preston, a first and second grade teacher at the Central Park East 1 School in East Harlem, New York; and Tasnim Azad and Ashley Leone, who both teach at the Children’s Learning Center at Morningside Heights in New York. Mentors Ellen Schwartz and Peg Howes have worked with the Prospect School and Center since the early 1980s.

Erin Whitney received the 2014 Prospect Research Fellowship. Whitney is an educator and a doctoral student at the University of Pennsylvania. She is using the Prospect Archive of Children’s Work to explore the ways that Prospect practitioners looked at the different kinds of works that children created to understand their learning and identities.

Learn more about Prospect and the Descriptive Processes

Prospect Research and Practitioner Fellowships

Prospect School and Center for Research and Education Archives

Prospect Archive of Children’s Work–Online

Jenny’s Story: Taking the Long View of the Child, Prospect’s Philosophy in Action (2010)
LB1115 .C278 2010 (B/H 3rd floor)

Starting Strong: A Different Look at Children, Schools, and Standards (2001)
LB1117 .C28 2001 (B/H 3rd floor)

From Another Angle: Children’s Strengths and School Standards, The Prospect Center’s Descriptive Review of the Child
LB1117 .F735 2000 (B/H 3rd floor)

Warren R. Austin Papers

Wednesday, May 14th, 2014

The Warren R. Austin Papers in Special Collections document the distinguished career of Vermont lawyer and statesman Warren Austin. They also provide insights into many of the important national and international events and issues of the mid-twentieth century.

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After graduating from Bakersfield Academy and the University of Vermont (class of 1899), Austin read law and was admitted to the Vermont bar in 1902. Except for a four-year stint in China with American International Corporation in 1916-1917, Austin practiced law in Vermont until 1931. After the death of Senator Frank L. Greene, Austin was appointed to the U.S. Senate, where he served until 1946. In 1946, President Truman appointed Austin as the first U. S. representative to the United Nations, a post he held until 1953. Austin, a Republican, was staunchly conservative on domestic issues and opposed the New Deal. His time in China led him to support American involvement in international affairs rather than adopt the isolationist position of his Republican colleagues.

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The United States News included a feature on the “nonisolationist Republican” senator from Vermont in February, 1941.

Austin’s papers came to UVM after his death in 1962. The boxes fill over 100 feet of shelf space, and include letters, memos of meetings and conversations, documents, speeches, manuscripts of writings, legislative bills and drafts, newspaper clippings, and photographs. The material covers some important work from his law career, such as the 1925-1927 settlement of the Vermont-New Hampshire Boundary. The papers are an especially rich resource for international issues that Austin worked on in the Senate and the UN, including the Bretton Woods proposals, the Dumbarton Oaks conference, the Committee of One Million, the United Nations, the Inter-American conference at Chapultepec, the Korean conflict, the Lend Lease bill, the Mackinac conference, NATO, Palestine, the Rio de Janeiro conference, and United World Federalists.

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Find this book in Special Collections.

A collection inventory is available online. Some documents from the Austin Papers are included in the Congressional Papers and Letters Home from Congress collections in the Center for Digital Initiatives.

Exhibit: Working the Landscape

Friday, April 25th, 2014

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Working the Landscape: Vermont’s Fields, Trails & Forests
Exhibit Cases, Bailey/Howe Library Lobby, May 1-August 20, 2014

Vermont landscapes are the outcome of natural processes and human work. While often imagined as an unchanging iconic place, Vermont’s landscapes are the result of diverse and on-going activities. This exhibit focuses on the tools, machines, and practices that have shaped Vermont’s fields, forests and recreational spaces. The exhibit also draws attention to the policies that have influenced how people work the land. Woven through the exhibit are the voices of Vermonters who reflect on what they value most about the state’s working landscape.

“Working the Landscape” is the outcome of a service-learning project for the Bailey/Howe Library conducted by masters students enrolled in UVM’s Food Systems Graduate Program. The students applied their disciplinary perspectives from the fields of anthropology, community development, geography, communications, sociology, food security, animal science, and network analysis in the research for this capstone project.

The students also created an online version of the exhibit.

Free and open to the public. For more information, email uvmsc@uvm.edu or call 656-1493.

Painting: Hay Bales in June, Anna Ayres


Slavery in Early Vermont: Evidence from the Archives

Wednesday, April 2nd, 2014

Special Collections Exhibit April 1-June 30, 2014

Although Article 1 of the Vermont Constitution of 1777 proclaimed that “no male person, born in this country, or brought from over sea, ought to be holden by law, to serve any person, as a servant, slave or apprentice, after he arrives to the age of twenty-one years, nor female, in like manner, after she arrives to the age of eighteen years,” historical evidence indicates that men, women and children were nonetheless held as property for decades after the Constitution was written.

Evidence of slavery in Vermont can be found in bills of sale, account books, newspaper advertisements, census records, government records, and town histories preserved in Vermont libraries and archives. This exhibit includes items from UVM Special Collections that confirm the persistence of slavery in the state during the late eighteenth century.

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“Sold to Col. John Barrett a Negro Girl Named Rose”

 

 

Free and open to the public. For more information, email uvmsc@uvm.edu or call 656-2138.

 

 

Book Arts

Wednesday, March 26th, 2014

An Inventory of Al-Mutanabbi Street: Selected Artists’ Books

The UVM Libraries’ Book Arts Collection includes nine books created when the Al-Mutanabbi Street Coalition called on book artists to “reassemble” an inventory of books and reading material lost after a car bomb exploded on Baghdad’s “Street of Booksellers” on March 5, 2007. The winding street, named after the tenth-century Arab poet, al-Mutanabbi, was filled with bookstores and bookstalls, cafes and gathering places. It was an important center of the city’s intellectual community. Many booksellers were killed and wounded, and stores and stalls were destroyed.

In 2010, the Al-Mutanabbi Street Coalition asked artists to create books “that reflected both the strength and fragility of books, but also showed the endurance of the ideas within them.” Artists from around the world have donated over 260 books to the project. One complete set of the books will be donated to the Iraq National Library in Baghdad, and others are being exhibited in the United States and Europe. Visit Special Collections to see the books shown here, and more.

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Al-Mutanabbi Street
The pages of Beata Wehr’s pamphlet contain carpets with the words “a book” in different languages and alphabets. It can be read from left to right, or from right to left, depending on the cultural preference. No matter where the reader starts, they will move into the attack—indicated by the blacked out text on the center page spread—and then beyond to the resurgence of books, on pages where the text is highlighted with bits of added color.

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To Make You See
Suzanne Sawyer printed quotes from Joseph Conrad and Seneca over a map of Baghdad that shows the area of al-Mutannabi Street. Sawyer chose the quotes “for their connection to the importance of books and reading as common ground for all people.”

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In the Minute Before, In the Minute After
Maureen Cummins and Tona Wilson used a dos à dos (back-to-back) structure to join two books, one that portrays a long and glorious literary and cultural heritage before the bomb exploded at 11:40 am, and a second that portrays the hellish world after the explosion.

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Street of Booksellers
Francis Jetter used a long accordion structure to show a street full of cafes and conversations, writers and readers, ghosts and dreams. The carved wooden covers put the “spines and bodies of books burned, broken, bulldozed” in our hands.

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Not a Straight Line
Emily Martin joined 10 small, Coptic-bound books to suggest a winding street of booksellers. As the reader unfolds the structure, the orientation twists and turns, suggesting the chaos that ensued after the explosion. Each book contains one line of text.

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Memento
Julie Chen created a meticulously designed metal locket that houses a small book on one side and a triptych on the other side. The small book challenges us to think about our relationship to printed words, information and reading. The triptych includes a woven token framed by photographs of al-Mutanabbi Street before the explosion. The texts on the woven strips are taken from the preambles to the United States and Iraqi constitutions. Visit UVM Special Collections to see the books shown here, and more.

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Al-Mutanabbi Street
Mary McCarthy and Shirley Veenema describe their book as “A circular narrative of destruction and rebirth, entered by either cover. Panoramas of place and events capture the irrepressible nature of words, thoughts, and ideas.” They collaborated to produce the collaged images, which are presented in an accordion structure that can be wrapped into a circle. The covers are covered with sand.

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One by One
Lynn Avadenka’s contribution to the al-Mutanabbi Street inventory was inspired by Wilfred Owen’s 1916 poem, The Parable of the Old Man and the Young, which appears on the last panel, at the end of what might be shops along a street or books on a shelf.