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Archive for the ‘Archive’ Category

Prospect Fellows Working at Bailey/Howe July 14-18

Wednesday, July 16th, 2014

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The third cohort of Prospect Fellows have gathered at Bailey/Howe this week to study the Prospect Archive of Children’s Work. Their residency is supported by the Prospect School and Center for Education and Research Fund, managed by UVM Special Collections.

The Prospect School in North Bennington, Vermont developed a methodology that allowed teachers to document children’s growth and learning. Prospect sponsored summer institutes, seminars and conferences for teachers who spread the school’s descriptive processes well beyond the North Bennington campus. In 2006, UVM Special Collections received the Prospect Archives as well as funds to support annual fellowships that encourage teachers to continue learning from the Prospect experience.

This year’s Practitioner Fellows include Kerry Elson, a teacher at the Weekday School at New York City’s  Riverside Church; Felicia Black, a professor at LIU Brooklyn; Caitlin Preston, a first and second grade teacher at the Central Park East 1 School in East Harlem, New York; and Tasnim Azad and Ashley Leone, who both teach at the Children’s Learning Center at Morningside Heights in New York. Mentors Ellen Schwartz and Peg Howes have worked with the Prospect School and Center since the early 1980s.

Erin Whitney received the 2014 Prospect Research Fellowship. Whitney is an educator and a doctoral student at the University of Pennsylvania. She is using the Prospect Archive of Children’s Work to explore the ways that Prospect practitioners looked at the different kinds of works that children created to understand their learning and identities.

Learn more about Prospect and the Descriptive Processes

Prospect Research and Practitioner Fellowships

Prospect School and Center for Research and Education Archives

Prospect Archive of Children’s Work–Online

Jenny’s Story: Taking the Long View of the Child, Prospect’s Philosophy in Action (2010)
LB1115 .C278 2010 (B/H 3rd floor)

Starting Strong: A Different Look at Children, Schools, and Standards (2001)
LB1117 .C28 2001 (B/H 3rd floor)

From Another Angle: Children’s Strengths and School Standards, The Prospect Center’s Descriptive Review of the Child
LB1117 .F735 2000 (B/H 3rd floor)

Exhibit: Working the Landscape

Friday, April 25th, 2014

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Working the Landscape: Vermont’s Fields, Trails & Forests
Exhibit Cases, Bailey/Howe Library Lobby, May 1-August 20, 2014

Vermont landscapes are the outcome of natural processes and human work. While often imagined as an unchanging iconic place, Vermont’s landscapes are the result of diverse and on-going activities. This exhibit focuses on the tools, machines, and practices that have shaped Vermont’s fields, forests and recreational spaces. The exhibit also draws attention to the policies that have influenced how people work the land. Woven through the exhibit are the voices of Vermonters who reflect on what they value most about the state’s working landscape.

“Working the Landscape” is the outcome of a service-learning project for the Bailey/Howe Library conducted by masters students enrolled in UVM’s Food Systems Graduate Program. The students applied their disciplinary perspectives from the fields of anthropology, community development, geography, communications, sociology, food security, animal science, and network analysis in the research for this capstone project.

The students also created an online version of the exhibit.

Free and open to the public. For more information, email uvmsc@uvm.edu or call 656-1493.

Painting: Hay Bales in June, Anna Ayres


Slavery in Early Vermont: Evidence from the Archives

Wednesday, April 2nd, 2014

Special Collections Exhibit April 1-June 30, 2014

Although Article 1 of the Vermont Constitution of 1777 proclaimed that “no male person, born in this country, or brought from over sea, ought to be holden by law, to serve any person, as a servant, slave or apprentice, after he arrives to the age of twenty-one years, nor female, in like manner, after she arrives to the age of eighteen years,” historical evidence indicates that men, women and children were nonetheless held as property for decades after the Constitution was written.

Evidence of slavery in Vermont can be found in bills of sale, account books, newspaper advertisements, census records, government records, and town histories preserved in Vermont libraries and archives. This exhibit includes items from UVM Special Collections that confirm the persistence of slavery in the state during the late eighteenth century.

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“Sold to Col. John Barrett a Negro Girl Named Rose”

 

 

Free and open to the public. For more information, email uvmsc@uvm.edu or call 656-2138.

 

 

Book Arts

Wednesday, March 26th, 2014

An Inventory of Al-Mutanabbi Street: Selected Artists’ Books

The UVM Libraries’ Book Arts Collection includes nine books created when the Al-Mutanabbi Street Coalition called on book artists to “reassemble” an inventory of books and reading material lost after a car bomb exploded on Baghdad’s “Street of Booksellers” on March 5, 2007. The winding street, named after the tenth-century Arab poet, al-Mutanabbi, was filled with bookstores and bookstalls, cafes and gathering places. It was an important center of the city’s intellectual community. Many booksellers were killed and wounded, and stores and stalls were destroyed.

In 2010, the Al-Mutanabbi Street Coalition asked artists to create books “that reflected both the strength and fragility of books, but also showed the endurance of the ideas within them.” Artists from around the world have donated over 260 books to the project. One complete set of the books will be donated to the Iraq National Library in Baghdad, and others are being exhibited in the United States and Europe. Visit Special Collections to see the books shown here, and more.

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Al-Mutanabbi Street
The pages of Beata Wehr’s pamphlet contain carpets with the words “a book” in different languages and alphabets. It can be read from left to right, or from right to left, depending on the cultural preference. No matter where the reader starts, they will move into the attack—indicated by the blacked out text on the center page spread—and then beyond to the resurgence of books, on pages where the text is highlighted with bits of added color.

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To Make You See
Suzanne Sawyer printed quotes from Joseph Conrad and Seneca over a map of Baghdad that shows the area of al-Mutannabi Street. Sawyer chose the quotes “for their connection to the importance of books and reading as common ground for all people.”

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In the Minute Before, In the Minute After
Maureen Cummins and Tona Wilson used a dos à dos (back-to-back) structure to join two books, one that portrays a long and glorious literary and cultural heritage before the bomb exploded at 11:40 am, and a second that portrays the hellish world after the explosion.

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Street of Booksellers
Francis Jetter used a long accordion structure to show a street full of cafes and conversations, writers and readers, ghosts and dreams. The carved wooden covers put the “spines and bodies of books burned, broken, bulldozed” in our hands.

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Not a Straight Line
Emily Martin joined 10 small, Coptic-bound books to suggest a winding street of booksellers. As the reader unfolds the structure, the orientation twists and turns, suggesting the chaos that ensued after the explosion. Each book contains one line of text.

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Memento
Julie Chen created a meticulously designed metal locket that houses a small book on one side and a triptych on the other side. The small book challenges us to think about our relationship to printed words, information and reading. The triptych includes a woven token framed by photographs of al-Mutanabbi Street before the explosion. The texts on the woven strips are taken from the preambles to the United States and Iraqi constitutions. Visit UVM Special Collections to see the books shown here, and more.

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Al-Mutanabbi Street
Mary McCarthy and Shirley Veenema describe their book as “A circular narrative of destruction and rebirth, entered by either cover. Panoramas of place and events capture the irrepressible nature of words, thoughts, and ideas.” They collaborated to produce the collaged images, which are presented in an accordion structure that can be wrapped into a circle. The covers are covered with sand.

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One by One
Lynn Avadenka’s contribution to the al-Mutanabbi Street inventory was inspired by Wilfred Owen’s 1916 poem, The Parable of the Old Man and the Young, which appears on the last panel, at the end of what might be shops along a street or books on a shelf.

Laureates Kochalka and Lea to Speak

Wednesday, March 19th, 2014

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Vermont Double Laureate Team-Up

April 8, 2014, 5:30 pm in the Special Collections Reading Room, Bailey/Howe Library, UVM

James Kochalka, Vermont’s first cartoonist laureate, and Sydney Lea, the state’s poet laureate, will talk about their unique collaboration during the fall of 2013. Sponsored by the Vermont Arts Council and the Center for Cartoon Studies, Lea and Kochalka exchanged drawings and verses to produce a book of illustrated poetry, Vermont Double Laureate Team-up. Called “a book of poetic cartoons,” it contains two stories, “Garnett and Leon in December,” and ” Squiggle: Tonight’s the Night.” Copies of the book printed especially for this event will be available to those who come to the April 8 presentation.

James Kochalka is a cartoonist, musician, and a faculty member at the Center for Cartoon Studies. He is well known for his Monkey vs. Robot series and for American Elf, which he produced daily for ten years.

Sydney Lea has published eleven collections of poetry, including the most recent, I was Thinking of Beauty. His nonfiction works include Notes on Rambling, Hunting the Whole Way Home, and A Little Wilderness. In 2013, Lea collaborated with Fleda Brown, a former poet laureate of Delaware, on a book of essays, Growing Old In Poetry: Two Poets, Two Lives. Lea has taught at several colleges and universities in New England and contributed to many literary journals and magazines. He founded and edited the New England Review from 1977-1989.

The presentation is free and open to the public. For more information, email uvmsc@uvm.edu or call 656-2138.

 

 

 

Remembering Birdie MacLennan

Wednesday, March 12th, 2014

Birdie MacLennan

It is with great sadness that we share that our colleague, Library Professor Birdie MacLennan passed away on March 10, 2014, after a brief illness.

Birdie began working in the Libraries’ Cataloging Department in 1990, after working at Harvard University and Merrimack College and receiving a Master of Library Sciences from Simmons College. Since 2008, she served as Director of the UVM Libraries’ Resource Description and Analysis Services Department. Her service to the library profession resulted in widespread recognition from her peers around the world. She was also an active member of the UVM faculty, with many years of service on the Faculty Senate’s Professional Standards Committee.

In 2005 she received a Master of Arts in French from UVM; these studies greatly informed her teaching and scholarship. She was the Libraries’ subject liaison to the Romance Languages department, where her growing proficiencies in French and Italian benefited faculty and students and satisfied her deep intellectual curiosity. Birdie was an accomplished and internationally recognized scholar, with particularly strong ties to Québec. Her in-depth research on the Grande Bibliothèque of Québec resulted in published works on libraries and cultural identity. She was an active member of the Burlington Italian Club and the Alliance Française Lake Champlain Region Chapter.

Birdie leaves behind a powerful and passionate legacy as a steward of Vermont history. Through projects funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities, she helped to ensure preservation copies and digital access for Vermont’s historic newspapers. Most recently, she served as Project Director and Principal Investigator for the Vermont Digital Newspaper Project, securing multiple rounds of funding and overseeing the creation of 250,000 pages of digital content, much of which is now available on the Library of Congress Chronicling America website.

Birdie was a devoted colleague and mentor, dedicated to serving students, faculty, staff, and librarians-in-training. She was compassionate, generous, and supportive to all who knew her. She will be profoundly missed in the faculty and staff of the University Libraries and as a valuable faculty member at the University of Vermont. She is survived by her sister Anne MacLennan Perkins, her niece Dominika Perkins, and her brother-in-law Donald Perkins of Nantucket, Massachusetts.

The Libraries are establishing a fund to further Birdie’s work preserving Vermont’s newspapers and will create a local digital collection in her name. Checks can be made payable to the UVM Foundation and directed to the UVM Libraries, in honor of Birdie MacLennan (The University of Vermont Foundation, 411 Main St., Burlington, VT 05401).

Birdie after a Chinese calligraphy lesson in Singapore last year. She wrote, "The character represents: Longevity, Life, Vivacity 壽 in the traditional Chinese script."

Birdie after a Chinese calligraphy lesson in Singapore last year. She wrote, “The character represents: Longevity, Life, Vivacity 壽 in the traditional Chinese script.”

Dana Medical Library: HERStory Exhibit

Tuesday, March 11th, 2014

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The Dana Medical Library is currently displaying “American Women in Medicine and Health Care Sciences” in celebration of UVM Women’s HERStory Month. The exhibit highlights some of the extraordinary achievements and famous firsts by women, and is on view throughout the month of March 2014. The exhibit is also on display at the College of Medicine Hoehl Gallery in the Given Medical building.

“Fruitvale Station”, A Film Review by Phil Cheney

Thursday, February 20th, 2014

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Fruitvale Station DVD 9902

 

Fruitvale Station is the true day-in-the-life story of Oscar Grant, a young struggling father who was shot to death by a police officer in Oakland, California on New Year’s Day of 2009. Most film review writers would find a witty sentence to convey how moving the film is, I will state most simply that it is nothing short of heartbreaking. The whole film builds to create a character that is kind, compassionate, and under a lot of stress from responsibility. While the character wins the audience over with charm, there is a building anticipation of dread and doom leading up to a devastating finale of loss and regret. All of which is beautifully shot with mostly natural lighting and very simple yet intricate compositions.

Besides being the emotionally driven and politically oriented film it is; Fruitvale Station is also one of the best film debuts from a writer/director that I have ever seen. The talented individual who brought this film to life is 27 year old Ryan Coogler, a graduate student from the University of Southern California School of Cinematic Arts. Growing up in the East Bay area north of Oakland, CA, Coogler was part of the community that was emotionally shocked by the murder of Oscar Grant by a police officer, which inspired him to write this screenplay about injustice and prejudice. Despite all of the sadness and melancholy of the film there is just as much love, tenderness and sense of community which is what makes the well-structured script so impactful. In an interview on the film Coogler stated that the scene where Oscar Grant is shot was filmed on location at the real station and the crew noticed that the bullet hole from the actual murder was still in the ground.

Aside from the fantastic direction and writing, the performances are also superb. Rising star Michael B. Jordan carries out the martyr-like role with sensitivity, compassion and anger. Oscar winner Octavia Spencer carries out her heart-wrenching role of Oscar’s mother with a competence equal to her award winning status; besides playing this key role she was also a major supporter in producing the film.

In our current period of cinema, where bland superhero movies or romantic comedies seem to be pumped out like a mindless conveyer belt; it is refreshing to see a beautiful film whose content is directed towards extreme social importance and humanist emphasis.

Persistent Link

Seeking Will Thomas’s The Seeking

Wednesday, February 19th, 2014

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March 13, 5:30 pm, Special Collections Reading Room, Bailey/Howe Library

Mark Madigan of Nazareth College will talk about his research on writer Will Thomas for a new edition of Thomas’s book The Seeking, published by Northeastern University Press in 2013 as part of the Northeastern Library of Black Literature.

After  Will Thomas abandoned a plan to move to Haiti to escape racial prejudice in the United States, he made the improbable decision to relocate his family to Westford, Vermont in 1946. The Seeking offers not only a remarkable account of the Thomases’ experience as the only non-white members of their rural community, but also gives insight into race relations in New England in the first half of the twentieth century. Well-received upon publication in 1953, the book soon faded into obscurity, as did its writer, whose other work includes a novel and a substantial body of journalism for African-American newspapers and pulp magazines.

To write his introduction to the new edition, Madigan consulted letters in the papers of Irene Allen, Dorothy Canfield Fisher, and Bradford Smith in Special Collections. Dan Gediman, the executive director of This I Believe, Inc. contributed the afterword. His interest in Thomas was prompted by an essay that Thomas read on Edward R. Murrow’s radio show, This I Believe, in 1953.

Madigan received his B.A. from St. Michael’s College, an M.A. from the University of Vermont and a Ph.D. from the University of Massachusetts. He is the editor of Youth and the Bright Medusa in the Willa Cather Scholarly Edition, Seasoned Timber by Dorothy Canfield Fisher (UP New England, 1996), The Bedquilt and Other Stories by Fisher, and Keeping Fires Night and Day: Selected Letters of Dorothy Canfield Fisher. He is currently  writing an essay on Charles Chesnutt’s short story “The Passing of Grandison” and co-directing “Cather and Europe/Europe and Cather”, a symposium being held in Rome in June 2014.

The presentation is free and open to the public. For more information, email uvmsc@uvm.edu or call 656-2138.

Free Film screening event! A DEMON IN MY VIEW

Tuesday, February 4th, 2014

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A Demon In My View

UVM Media Resources student assistant and Junior Environmental Science student Matt Lipke is premiering his horror/thriller feature-length film here at UVM this Friday, February 7th at Billings Ira Allen Lecture Hall. The doors open at 6:45pm and the film will begin at 7:00pm. The event is FREE!!

Inspired by the life and works of Edgar Allan Poe, A DEMON IN MY VIEW is a horror/thriller film about a young college student struggling with her tragic past.

Produced and filmed in Syracuse, New York, the film took 21 months to produce and had a budget of about $6,000.

A DEMON IN MY VIEW has just been picked up by Tugg, a theatrical and non-theatrical distribution partner!

Join us to see a student’s work on the big screen!

Refreshments will be provided by the UVM Film Club!