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Time for Cake

Friday, April 14th, 2017

New Publications by Library Faculty

Tuesday, April 4th, 2017

Congratulations to librarians Alana Verminski and Chris Burns on their recent publications.

Alana, the collection development librarian at Bailey/Howe, is the co-author with Kelly Marie Blanchat of the recently released Fundamentals of Electronic Resources Management. Their book is a comprehensive hands-on guide to the continually evolving field of electronic resources management.

Chris, the Curator of Manuscripts and University Archivist, has an article in the latest issue of Vermont History, “Negotiating Community Values: The Franklin County Agricultural Society Premium Lists, 1844-1889.” Chris  examines  county  fair  premium  lists  preserved in a record book in UVM Special Collections to  show  how  the  meaning  and  impact of  agricultural  fairs,  originally  intended  as  a  way to achieve agricultural and economic reform, were shaped as much or more by those who attended the fairs as they were by the organizers.

Andrew Carnegie Medals for Excellence 2017 Finalists

Thursday, March 23rd, 2017

Andrew Carnegie Medals for Excellence in Fiction and Nonfiction 2017 Finalists

From ala.org:

2017 WINNER

The Underground Railroad, Colson Whitehead

In this magnetizing and wrenching saga, Whitehead tells the story of smart and resilient Cora, a young third-generation slave on a Georgia cotton plantation. Certain that the horror will only get worse, she flees with a young man who knows how to reach the Underground Railroad. Each stop Cora makes along the Underground Railroad reveals another shocking and malignant symptom of a country riven by catastrophic conflicts, a poisonous moral crisis, and diabolical violence. Hard-driving, laser-sharp, artistically superlative, and deeply compassionate, Whitehead’s unforgettable odyssey adds a clarion new facet to the literature of racial tyranny and liberation. – ALA.org

 

Moonglow, Michael Chabon

Moonglow unfolds as the deathbed confession of a man the narrator refers to only as “my grandfather.” It is a tale of madness, of war and adventure, of sex and marriage and desire, of existential doubt and model rocketry, of the shining aspirations and demonic underpinnings of American technological accomplishment at mid century, and, above all, of the destructive impact–and the creative power–of keeping secrets and telling lies. – ALA.org

 

Swing Time, Zadie Smith

The unnamed narrator in Smith’s agile and discerning bildungsroman is entranced and provoked by a Fred Astaire dance number in the movie Swing Time. “Swing time” is also a feat her narrator performs as she pivots from the disastrous present back to the past as she tries to understand her plummet by telling her story and that of her childhood best friend, Tracey. With homage to dance as a unifying force, arresting observations, exceptionally diverse and magnetizing characters, and lashing satire, Swing Time is an acidly funny, fluently global, and head-spinning novel about the quest for meaning, exaltation, and love. – ALA.org

 

The Firebrand and the First Lady, Patricia Bell-Scott

Eleanor Roosevelt, born to privilege, prosperity, and power, first crossed paths with Pauli Murray, the granddaughter of a slave struggling against racism and poverty, in 1934 when the First Lady visited an upstate New York facility for unemployed women. Four years later, Murray sent the opening salvo in what became a fervent correspondence that lasted until Roosevelt’s death. Bell-Scott meticulously chronicles their boundary-breaking friendship, telling each remarkable woman’s story within the context of the crises of the times, from ongoing racial violence to WWII and the vicious battle over school integration, creating a sharply detailed and profoundly illuminating narrative. – ALA.org

 

Evicted, Matthew Desmond

Desmond does a marvelous job exposing the harrowing stories of people who find themselves in bad situations, shining a light on how eviction sets people up to fail. He also makes the case that eviction disproportionately affects women (and, worse, their children). This is essential reading for anyone interested in social justice, poverty, and feminist issues, but its narrative nonfiction style will also draw general readers—and will hopefully spark national discussion. – ALA.org

 

Blood at the Root, Patrick Phillips

As current political discourse addresses controversial notions regarding immigrants and race relationships, the events Phillips describes in this harrowing chronicle of racial cleansing in Forsyth County, Georgia, in the early twentieth century feels eerily contemporary and all-too relevant. Although Phillips is an award-winning poet, translator, and professor, he brings a journalist’s crisp perspective to this precise and disquieting account of a reprehensible and under-reported chapter in America’s racial history. – ALA.org

*On order

 

 

 

 

This Just in: New Novels

Thursday, March 16th, 2017

Please Do Not Disturb: A Novel

Robert Glancy

A gripping and beautifully observed novel of power, corruption and innocence from the author of Terms & Conditions Charlie, a curious boy with a dangerous Dictaphone habit, eavesdrops on the eccentric guests of the Mirage Hotel, as the African nation of Bwalo prepares for the annual appearance of its Glorious Leader Tafumo. Sean, who’s given his heart (and the best part of his liver) to Bwalo, struggles to write the great African novel – if only his crazed fiancee would stop distracting him. Josef, kingmaker and mythmaker, starts to hear the ominous rattle of skeletons in his closet. Hope, the nurse caring for the King, keeps the old man alive as she mourns her own broken dreams. And storm clouds gather as petty criminal, Jack, smuggles something into Bwalo – to the Mirage Hotel – that will change the lives of all of them for ever…

 

2084: The End of the World

Boualem Sansal

A tribute to George Orwell’s 1984 and a cry of protest against totalitarianism of all kinds, Sansal’s 2084 tells the story of a near future in which religious extremists have established an oppressive caliphate where autonomous thought is forbidden.

“[In 2084] Sansal dared to go much further than I did,” said Michel Houellebecq, the controversial novelist most recently of Submission. 2084 is a cry of freedom, a call to rebellion, a gripping satirical novel of ideas, and an indictment of the religious fundamentalism that, with its hypocrisy and closed-mindedness, threatens our modern democracies and the ideals on which they are founded.

 

The Animators: A Novel

Kayla Rae Whitaker

A funny, heartbreaking novel of friendship, art, and trauma, The Animators is about the secrets we keep and the burdens we shed on the road to adulthood.

“A wildly original novel that pulses with heart and truth . . . That this powerful exploration of friendship, desire, ambition, and secrets manages to be ebullient, gripping, heartbreaking, and deeply deeply funny is a testament to Kayla Rae Whitaker’s formidable gifts. I was so sorry to reach the final page. Sharon and Mel will stay with me for a very long time.”—Cynthia D’Aprix Sweeney, author of The Nest

 

Amiable with Big Teeth

Claude McKay

The unexpected discovery in 2009 of a completed manuscript of Claude McKay’s final novel was celebrated as one of the most significant literary events in recent years. Building on the already extraordinary legacy of McKay’s life and work, this colorful, dramatic novel centers on the efforts by Harlem intelligentsia to organize support for the liberation of fascist-controlled Ethiopia, a crucial but largely forgotten event in American history. At once a penetrating satire of political machinations in Depression-era Harlem and a far-reaching story of global intrigue and romance, Amiable with Big Teeth plunges into the concerns, anxieties, hopes, and dreams of African-Americans at a moment of crisis for the soul of Harlem—and America.

 

Dark at the Crossing: A Novel

Elliot Ackerman

Haris Abadi is a man in search of a cause. An Arab American with a conflicted past, he is now in Turkey, attempting to cross into Syria and join the fight against Bashar al-Assad’s regime. But he is robbed before he can make it, and is taken in by Amir, a charismatic Syrian refugee and former revolutionary, and Amir’s wife, Daphne, a sophisticated beauty haunted by grief. As it becomes clear that Daphne is also desperate to return to Syria, Haris’s choices become ever more wrenching: Whose side is he really on? Is he a true radical or simply an idealist? And will he be able to bring meaning to a life of increasing frustration and helplessness? Told with compassion and a deft hand, Dark at the Crossing is an exploration of loss, of second chances, and of why we choose to believe–a trenchantly observed novel of raw urgency and power.

 

This is How it Always is: A Novel

Laurie Frankel

This is Claude. He’s five years old, the youngest of five brothers, and loves peanut butter sandwiches. He also loves wearing a dress, and dreams of being a princess.

When he grows up, Claude says, he wants to be a girl.

Rosie and Penn want Claude to be whoever Claude wants to be. They’re just not sure they’re ready to share that with the world. Soon the entire family is keeping Claude’s secret. Until one day it explodes.

Laurie Frankel’s This Is How It Always Is is a novel about revelations, transformations, fairy tales, and family. And it’s about the ways this is how it always is: Change is always hard and miraculous and hard again, parenting is always a leap into the unknown with crossed fingers and full hearts, children grow but not always according to plan. And families with secrets don’t get to keep them forever.

Courier Delivery and LRA Document Delivery Canceled: Tuesday, March 14

Tuesday, March 14th, 2017

Library courier service and the LRA document delivery service will be canceled today (Tuesday March 14) due to dangerous road conditions and short staffing.

Our apologies for any inconvenience that this creates.

Dear Diary: Women’s Lives in Their Own Words

Monday, March 6th, 2017

Tuesday, March 28, 2017, 6:00 pm
Special Collections, Bailey/Howe Library

To celebrate Women’s History Month, Special Collections librarians and Preservation Burlington members will showcase the words of Vermont women who wrote about their experiences attending, working, and teaching at colleges and universities. Drawing from the UVM Libraries manuscripts collection, they will read selections from diaries and letters written by Ellen Hamilton Woodruff, one of UVM’s first female students, UVM Dean of Students Mary Jean Simpson, Genieve Lamson, a Randolph, Vermont woman who attended the University of Chicago, and Katherine Fletcher, who graduated from the Johnson State Normal School. Audience participation is strongly encouraged. Please bring your own journal to read.

The event is free and open to the public. Refreshments will be served. For more information, email uvmsc@uvm.edu or call 656-2138.

Visitor parking information.

Photo: October 26-27 entries in Mary Jean Simpson’s 1937 diary, shortly after she became Dean of Students at UVM.

Fair Use Week at UVM Libraries

Friday, February 17th, 2017

UVM Libraries Celebrate Fair Use Week! February 20- 24th

What is Fair Use/Fair Dealing Week?

By Jeanene Light of the Dana Medical Library

Fair Use/Fair Dealing Week is an annual celebration of the important doctrines of fair use in the United States and fair dealing in Canada and other jurisdictions. Under these terms, copyrighted materials are allowed use without permission from the copyright holder under certain circumstances. Fair use is one of the traditional safety valves intended to balance the interests of copyright holders with the public interest in the wider distribution and use of creative works by allowing certain limited uses that might otherwise be considered infringement.

While students, faculty, librarians, journalists, and all users of copyrighted material employ fair use and fair dealing on a daily basis, Fair Use/Fair Dealing Week celebrates this important right.

How do you determine fair use in your research or education?

To determine if a use is “fair use”, there are typically four factors used to evaluate the work in question. Read more and find more information, about these four factors at the University of Texas Libraries website page on Fair Use. Also learn about Fair Use in a Day in the Life of a College Student in the poster below.

Contact Jeanene Light at 656-0521 with questions about Fair Use Week at UVM.

 

Scholarly Metrics – Research by UVM Library Faculty

Tuesday, February 7th, 2017

Hot off the presses! Check out this article on UVM Faculty attitudes towards, and use of scholarly metrics by Bailey/Howe Librarians, Daniel DeSanto and Aaron Nichols. Congratulations Dan and Aaron.

Abstract:

This article presents the results of a faculty survey conducted at the University of Vermont during academic year 2014-2015. The survey asked faculty about: familiarity with scholarly metrics, metric-seeking habits, help-seeking habits, and the role of metrics in their department’s tenure and promotion process. The survey also gathered faculty opinions on how well scholarly metrics reflect the importance of scholarly work and how faculty feel about administrators gathering institutional scholarly metric information. Results point to the necessity of understanding the campus landscape of faculty knowledge, opinion, importance, and use of scholarly metrics before engaging faculty in further discussions about quantifying the impact of their scholarly work.

Citation and link:

DeSanto, D., & Nichols, A. (2017). Scholarly Metrics Baseline: A Survey of Faculty Knowledge, Use, and Opinion about Scholarly Metrics. College & Research Libraries, 78(2), 150–170. https://doi.org/10.5860/crl.78.2.150

Vermont Refugee and Immigrant Stories

Sunday, February 5th, 2017

Here is a list of selected memoirs and biographies from immigrants and refugees who left their homes for safer and better lives in Vermont. (Click on a book’s title to find its call number and location in the library.)

Thank You for My Green Card
In this memoir, Edgar May describes the journey he took to the U.S. from Zurich, Switzerland with his mother and sister, former Vermont Governor Madeleine Kunin, to escape the growing threat of the Holocaust. He writes about his work as a journalist, his service in the U.S. Army, his contributions to the War on Poverty and Special Olympics, and his time in the Vermont House of Representatives (1983-1991) and the Vermont Senate (1984-1990).

First They Killed My Father: A Daughter of Cambodia Remembers
Lucky Child: A Daughter of Cambodia Reunites with the Sister She Left Behind
Lulu in the Sky: A Daughter of Cambodia Finds Love, Healing, and Double Happiness

As a small child, Loung Ung survived Cambodia’s brutal Pol Pot regime, and escaped with a brother to a refugee camp in Thailand before relocating to Vermont as a 10-year old. Her first memoir chronicles that experience. In her second memoir, she writes about the challenges of coping with post-traumatic stress and assimilating into  American life in Vermont, and in alternating chapters writes about the life of her only surviving sister, still in Cambodia. Ung has said that the last volume of her trilogy, “is my journey of going from surviving to thriving… about reconnecting, reclaiming, and rejoicing.” She recounts her efforts to reconcile a past and present through love, activism, and new connections with her family and the country of her birth.

Greek Epic: The Latchis Family & the New England Theater Empire They Built
Greek Epic tells the story of immigrant Demetrios Latsis and the four generations of his family who built a movie theater empire from their home base in Brattleboro.

Refugee: The Ugliest Word, by Aftaba Mezetovic.
Bosnian refugee and Winooski educator Aftaba Mezetovic dedicates her book of poems “to refugees worldwide who have survived war, concentration camps and loss of homeland.”

Lost Generation: The Story of a Sudanese Orphan
Peter Garang Deng moved from a childhood of deprivation in South Sudan to a refugee camp in Kenya before coming to Burlington, Vermont, where he graduated from Champlain College and established a foundation dedicated to educating South Sudanese orphans.

Giving a Lift in Time: A Finnish Immigrant’s Story
Sarcka’s family came to Vermont from Finland in the late 19th-century to work in the marble quarries near Proctor. In 1932, Sarcka and his wife established Spring Lake Ranch, a therapeutic community for people with mental illness, in Cuttingsville.

The Bridging of Two Cultures
The Bridging of Two Cultures is an account of “how one family of French Canadian descent, without compromising its heritage, learned to live and cope in the border village of Derby Line, Vermont.”

Fall in Love with a New Book!

Wednesday, February 1st, 2017

Stop by the first floor New Books section of the Bailey/Howe Library and take a look at some of these gorgeous new art books!

 

Alex Janvier

“Many of his masterpieces involve an eloquent blend of both abstract and representational images with bright, often symbolic colours. As a First Nations person emerging from a history of oppression and many struggles for cultural empowerment, Janvier paints both the challenges and celebrations that he has encountered in his lifetime. Alex proudly credits the beadwork and birch bark basketry of his mother and other relatives as influencing his art.” – from Alex Janvier’s website.

      

 

The Edge of the Earth : Climate Change in Photography and Video

“Increasingly and forebodingly, artists are turning their attention to the subject of climate change, in poignant and often confrontational ways. The Edge of the Earth: Climate Change in Photography and Video features recent and historic work by a range of pioneering and visionary artists from around the world. Photojournalism from the RIC’s famed Black Star Collection is also included, contextualising artistic reflections alongside half a century of historical reportage on the environment.” – from the Ryerson Image Centre website.

      

 

Hieronymus Bosch: Visions of Genius

“Hieronymus Bosch is a world-class artist. His characteristic work full of illusions and hallucinations, bizarre monsters and nightmares, depicts the great themes of his time: temptation, sin and judgement. His work was no less popular after his death and it has inspired innumerable artists to the present day. It also means that Bosch is one of the most important artists of the late Middle Ages. His popularity is, of course, connected with the puzzling character of his images. You remain fascinated.” – from the Bosch Exhibition website at the Noordbrabants Museum.

      

 

Pipilotti Rist: Pixel Forest

“Over the past thirty years, Rist (b. 1962) has achieved international renown as a pioneer of video art and multimedia installations. Her mesmerizing works envelop viewers in sensual, vibrantly colored kaleidoscopic projections that fuse the natural world with the technological sublime. Referring to her art as a “glorification of the wonder of evolution,” Rist maintains a deep sense of curiosity that pervades her explorations of physical and psychological experiences. Her works bring viewers into unexpected, all-consuming encounters with the textures, forms, and functions of the living universe around us.” – from the New Museum’s website on the latest Pipilotti Rist exhibition, Pixel Forest.