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September is Suicide Prevention Awareness Month

Monday, September 12th, 2016


Suicide is one of the leading causes of death for young adults. According to a report by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 1 in 13 young adults in the United States ages 18 to 25 had serious thoughts of suicide between 2013 and 2014.

As September is Suicide Prevention Awareness Month, we at the Libraries would like to remind you of all of the fantastic resources that the University has to offer. Most notably, the Center for Health and Wellbeing offers a wide range of services to support your mind, body, and soul while you’re at UVM. The Center for Health and Wellbeing offers care at several locations; including Living Well on the ground floor of the Davis Center, Counseling and Psychiatry Services (CAPS) located at the Jacob’s house on South Williams Street and in the Christie/Wright/Patterson Complex on Redstone, and Student Health Services; located in the UHC building on Pearl Street. For more information or support, stop by Living Well on the ground floor of the Davis Center and meet with their friendly and welcoming staff – including Tucker, UVM’s own therapy dog!

Also, keep an eye out for our regular de-stress events here at the Bailey/Howe, usually during midterms and finals!

livingwellstaff   livingwelltable

livingwelllibtucker   livingwellmap

UVM Center for Health and Wellbeing

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline

Suicide Prevention Resources


For More Information…

If you are looking for information on suicide prevention from a research perspective, check out the following journals below. And as always feel free to stop by the Reference Desk for assistance!

Suicide and Life-Threatening Behavior

American Journal of Psychiatry

Archives of General Psychiatry

Wellness Perspectives

Archives_of_Gen   11495


Breaking the Deckle: Using the Paper Arts for Social Justice

Friday, September 9th, 2016


Breaking the Deckle: Using the Paper Arts for Social Justice
Drew Matott, Peace Paper Project
October 11, 5:30 pm
Special Collections, Bailey/Howe Library

Drew Matott is a master papermaker with an expertise using traditional papermaking as a form of trauma therapy, social engagement, and community activism. In this presentation, Mattot will discuss how he became involved with the paper arts and describe the genesis of the community papermaking programs he has co-founded, including Green Door Studio, Combat Paper Project, Peace Paper Project, Papermaking as Art Therapy, and Panty Pulping.

Matott directs the vision and strategy of Peace Paper Project, which utilizes traditional hand papermaking as a means of engaging communities in art practices which bring people together, broadcast their stories, and transform their fibers into meaningful art pieces. The project operates everywhere from private workshops to public demonstrations in order to perpetuate the art of hand papermaking while adapting to the needs of each specific community. Peace Paper merges its skill set of papermaking, bookbinding, printmaking, and creative writing with the unique practices and concepts of host communities as a way of empowering  collaboration.

Other local colleges will also be hosting Peace Paper Project activities.In Panty Pulping workshops at St. Michael’s College on October 10 and at Champlain College on October 13, participants will confront sexual and domestic violence by transforming underwear into handmade paper. Champlain will also host an exhibit from October 9-29.

The presentation is free and open to the public. Refreshments will be served. For more information, email uvmsc@uvm.edu or call 656-2138.

Visitor parking information.

New Books at the Bailey/Howe

Friday, August 26th, 2016

Cool off from a summer of beach reads with some new non-fiction! These works can be found on our New Book shelf in Bailey/Howe, an ever-rotating sampling of things we’re adding to our collection. You can also review all our newest books online, and subscribe via RSS to receive alerts about acquisitions, by discipline.


Artificial Darkness: An Obscure History of Modern Art and Media by Noam M. Elcott

“Darkness has a history and a uniquely modern form. Distinct from night, shadows, and artificial light, ‘artificial darkness’ has been overlooked—until now. In fact, controlled darkness was essential to the rise of photography and cinema, science and spectacle, and a century of advanced art and film. Artificial Darkness is the first book to historicize and theorize this phenomenon and map its applications across a range of media and art forms.” -The University of Chicago Press


Wild Sex: The Science Behind Mating in the Animal Kingdom by Dr. Carin Bondar

“In this chatty and engaging account, science communicator Bondar takes readers on an encyclopedic tour of sex across the animal kingdom…she succeeds by taking a thoroughly evolutionary perspective, describing often shocking actions (various forms of sexual violence are remarkably common in nature) and offering explanations for those behaviors…she also explores topics of particular interest to humans, including monogamous pair bonding (which is very rare) and homosexuality (which is very common). Stories about sex are fun to read, and Bondar makes them informative, too.” -Publishers Weekly


Psychedelia and Other Colours by Rob Chapman

“In Psychedelia and Other Colours, acclaimed author Rob Chapman explores in crystalline detail the history, precedents and cultural impact of LSD, from the earliest experiments in painting with light and immersive environments to the thriving avant-garde scene that existed in San Francisco even before the Grateful Dead and the Fillmore Auditorium. In the UK, he documents an entirely different history, and one that has never been told before. It has its roots in fairy tales and fairgrounds, the music hall and the dead of Flanders fields, in the Festival of Britain and that peculiarly British strand of surrealism that culminated in the Magical Mystery Tour… Psychedelia and Other Colours documents these utopian reverberations – and the dark side of their moon – in a perfect portrait.”-Goodreads


Culinary Shakespeare: Staging Food and Drink in Early Modern England edited by David B. Goldstein and Amy L. Tigner

“Eating and drinking — vital to all human beings — were of central importance to Shakespeare and his contemporaries. Culinary Shakespeare, the first collection devoted solely to the study of food and drink in Shakespeare’s plays, reframes questions about cuisine, eating, and meals in early modern drama… The essays in Culinary Shakespeare build upon that prior focus on individual bodily experience but also transcend it, emphasizing the aesthetic, communal, and philosophical aspects of food, while also presenting valuable theoretical background… Culinary Shakespeare seeks to open new interpretive possibilities and will be of interest not only to scholars and students of Shakespeare and the early modern period, but also to those in food studies, food history, ecology, gender and domesticity, and critical theory.” -Amazon

Copying Nature

Wednesday, July 27th, 2016


In the 1830s and 1840s, John Henry Hopkins, Vermont’s first Episcopal bishop, and his son, John Henry Hopkins Jr., produced the Burlington Drawing-Book of Flowers, and a portfolio version, titled The Vermont Drawing Book of Flowers. The book was designed to be an instructional tool to teach drawing, but Hopkins also hoped that sales would raise much needed funds to support his struggling Vermont Episcopal Institute, a secondary school for boys. This summer, the beautifully hand-colored plates of domestic flowers are on display in the Special Collections reading room in Bailey/Howe Library.

100 Years: Let’s Celebrate!

Tuesday, July 19th, 2016


The National Park Service turns 100 on August 25, 2016, and everyone can take part in the celebration.

The centennial will kick off a second century of stewardship of America’s national parks and engaging communities through recreation, conservation, and historic preservation programs.

This exhibit includes materials selected from our Government Information collection.  The UVM Libraries are proud to be part of the Federal Depository Library Program.







New Exhibit: On the Waterfront

Wednesday, July 6th, 2016


For the 2016 Vermont History Expo, UVM Special Collections responded to the event theme of “the power of water” with an exhibit drawn from the rich resources about Vermont summer camps in the Vermont Research Collection. “On the Waterfront,” which focuses on camp waterfronts and water activities, will be displayed in the Baily/Howe Library lobby for the summer.

Vermont’s lakes, ponds and reservoirs have provided the setting for children’s summer camps since the late 1800s. For over a century, camp promotional materials have promoted their beautiful and safe waterfront locations. Staff and campers agree that the waterfront has been central to the camp experience. As one camp proclaimed, “Swimming and boating are the crowning delights of camp life.”

The exhibit is free and open to the public. For more information, email uvmsc@uvm.edu or call 802-656-2138.

Sugar on Snow, April 26, 11-2:30

Tuesday, April 12th, 2016

Maple syrup, pickles, donuts and coffee will be served at UVM’s annual maple celebration in front of Bailey/Howe.


Holocaust Stories

Monday, April 11th, 2016


As part of her spring semester internship in Special Collections, senior Perri Moreno created a new exhibit for the department, “Holocaust Stories.” The exhibit includes powerful stories of Holocaust experiences in works by book artists Barbara Milman, Tatana Kellner, Robbin Ami Silverberg, Jeffrey W. Morin, and Jacques Fournier. These books are just some of the titles that Special Collections has acquired to support the work of UVM’s Carolyn and Leonard Miller Center for Holocaust Studies, which is marking its 25th anniversary this year.

Spring Exhibits in the Bailey/Howe Lobby

Friday, March 18th, 2016

From Pyramus & Thisbe, with woodcuts by Chris Nurse.

Our Special Collections librarians created two exhibits for the Bailey/Howe lobby this semester, “Shakespeare in Print” and “John Johnson: Surveyor, Master Builder, Civil Engineer, and More.”

Shakespeare in Print: Interpretations of the Bard’s Theatrical Works at the Quadricentennial of his Death

This exhibit, curated by Jeffrey Marshall, Director of Special Collections, presents a variety of approaches to Shakespeare in print using examples from the Rare Book Collection.

At the death of William Shakespeare on April 23, 1616, his literary and theatrical reputation was etched in the memories of the general public, but little of it was reflected in print.  Some of his plays had been published individually in “quartos,” but apparently the Bard had little or no active participation in their publication.  Two of his stage colleagues decided to remedy this deficiency by publishing the complete works of Shakespeare in “folio” format.  Working from Shakespeare’s notes, the published quartos, and their own memories, the two prepared thirty-six plays for publication.  Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Tragedies, & Histories (London, 1623), popularly known today as The First Folio, was published in an edition of about 750 copies.  Second, Third, and Fourth folios followed later in the century, and thousands of editions, of varying format and content, have been published in the centuries since.

John Johnson: Surveyor, Master Builder, Civil Engineer, and More

The second exhibit sheds light on the extensive talents and activities of John Johnson (1771-1842), who came to northwestern Vermont in 1790 and settled in Burlington in 1809.

As a surveyor, Johnson played an important role in land development during Vermont’s early years. He served as Vermont’s surveyor general from 1813 to 1823, and again from 1832 to 1838, and supervised surveys of the eastern section of the Canada-U.S. border from 1817 to 1820. Johnson designed a wide variety of building types and structures, including, including the first and second College Buildings at UVM.  He was also an agent for the Vermont Mutual Fire Insurance Co., served in the legislature in 1803, and helped organize associations that sponsored lectures and debates and supported lending libraries. The exhibit includes maps, surveys and drawings from Special Collections’ extensive John Johnson Collection.


Johnson’s drawing for UVM’s Middle Building, 1829




Public Monuments: The Politics and Processes of Commemoration

Sunday, February 21st, 2016



Public Monuments: The Politics and Processes of Commemoration
Thursday, March 17, 2016, 5:30 pm
Special Collections, Bailey/Howe Library

Bill Lipke and Bill Mares, authors of the recently published Grafting Memory, will present an illustrated lecture summarizing the research which they undertook for their book on commemorative monuments from the American Revolutionary War to the present. In their essays, Lipke and Mares explore the evolving practices that allow memories of soldiers and wars to pass through generations. From monuments to cemeteries, paintings and living memorials, they present diverse examples, including many close to home, like Burlington’s Battery Park and Memorial Auditorium, and those farther away, like Canada’s War Memorial project and national cemeteries in France.

Bill Lipke is UVM professor emeritus in Art History and a former director of the Fleming Museum. He has written about landscape painting and modern architecture. Bill Mares has been a journalist and high school teacher, and has fifteen books to his credit on subjects ranging from beer and coffee to Vermont politics.

The presentation is free and open to the public. Refreshments will be served. For more information, email uvmsc@uvm.edu or call 656-2138.

Visitor parking information.