Tag Archives: librarians

Dana Responds to Book Retrieval Questions and Concerns


With a new book retrieval system under way, Dana is working to smooth out the kinks. The library continues to make adjustments and improvements as issues arise. For example, Dana just recently made changes to the online retrieval form to clearly emphasize contact information, add a confirmation email, and state that requests will be filled within 1 business day.  As each search and request is unique, Dana’s knowledgeable staff are ready and available to assist with any concerns and questions.

Below is an example of patron feedback submitted through the Dana website feedback page about the removal of books to off-site storage and how it effects research and study. Dana Librarian, Laura Haines, responds.

Anonymous post by CNHS Graduate Student:

I am unhappy with the books of the library being re-located. This makes it very difficult to complete assignments that require book references in a timely manner. I would suggest bringing the book sources back into the library or finding a way to make the book sources readily available in an online format.

Dana Librarian, Laura Haines MLS, in reply to anonymous post:

Thank you for your comment. While we can’t bring the books back to the Library, we can reassure you that the majority of the books will be returning in May. Those books will be the most current and most desired books in our collection. A portion of the total collection will remain in storage.

Starting Monday, October 10th, there will be a courier who will retrieve books from off-site storage. If you request a book before 11:30 am, the book will be delivered to the Library by 4:00 pm the same day Monday through Friday.

Talking to your professors may help; if there are books that the professor would like to be readily available to students, that professor can request that the book(s) be put on Reserve here in the Library.

We cannot make all books available electronically, because not all titles have an electronic version. However, the Library does have a robust collection of electronic books. Search for ebooks in CATQuest and click to Show only Online Resources.

We have forwarded your complaint to the project team to let them know of your concerns, and to make sure they understand that everyone would like the books back as soon as possible.

We are certain there will be many bumps in the road during this renovation project, and we are truly sorry. We appreciate feedback, and welcome any ideas you might have as to ways we can improve our stored book retrieval system. We also appreciate your patience during this transition.

Do you have questions or concerns? Please contact the Main Desk at 656-2200 or leave a comment on our website feedback page.

Dana’s Main Desk: A Central Location for all Library Services

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For those of you returning from break or beginning your journey as a student, faculty member or medical professional, all the services that you expect from your medical library are available to you through the Main Desk:

The Main Desk is the source for answers to a wide range of questions. Switching to a single service location maximizes library space and better serves patron needs while becoming the central point for help, information, and services at the Library. Stop at the Main Desk to find an e-journal or get started on a PubMed or CatQuest search on your topic!

The Main Desk is the place to go for curriculum support. Access and place materials on reserve, request articles through electronic article delivery and interlibrary loan, gain support for research, get help with database navigation and reserve group study spaces. Also, check out books, media and print journals and borrow supplies like ethernet & power cables, standup desks, white boards & markers, and headphones.

Get help with technology for printing, scanning, copying, public computers, wireless access, and referral to external IT support. In addition, the library has a lost and found and can provide emergency cleanup supplies.

A medical librarian is at hand for research support. Although the word “Reference” may not be used any longer, an on-demand librarian assistance service is available through the Main Desk. Get focused attention for your individual or group research. Help from librarians is available on a walk-in basis 10 am to 4 pm each weekday. Or make an appointment on the Library’s webpage. Meet some of our Research Support Librarians:

Dana removed its Reference Desk after carefully researching the library literature and conducting wide-ranging discussions among Library faculty and staff. The Circulation Desk then morphed into the central location for all services and became the Main Desk.

Staffed by Lesley Boucher (supervisor), John Printon, Brenda Nelson, Colin McClung and Craig Chalone, with the help of student assistants, the Main Desk is the place to find help for all your library needs. Contact them at 656-2200 to get started.

Dana Medical Library Welcomes Incoming Family Medicine Interns


On Thursday, June 23rd, Dana Librarian Fred Pond, MLS, presented to incoming UVM Medical Center Family Medicine Interns on available library resources and services. An example of the many services that the Library provides to the UVM Medical Center, the session touched on the following topics:

  • Mobile Devices-Activation & Practice
  • Searching & Comparing Point of Care Resources
  • PubMed Advanced Tips & Techniques

One of the many jobs of Dana librarians is to provide outreach to the UVM Medical Center and UVM Medical Complex departments giving them the information they need to utilize the library to the best of their ability. Each librarian serves as a liaison, or subject specialist, to each department. To contact the liaison for your department or subject, find a complete list of the departments and respective liaisons on the Subject Specialists page of Dana’s website.

Fred Pond also presented on Monday, June 27th to the incoming UVM Medical Center Pharmacies Interns. For more information on the work that Fred does, contact Fred Pond at 656-4143.

Dana Medical Library Circulation Desk has moved


The Circulation Desk has moved to its original location at the front of the Library and the Reference Desk will continue to stay where it is as construction continues. Patrons will be able to ask questions of the circulation desk staff during Library hours. The Reference Desk will be open from 10 am to 4 pm during the week and 9 am to 9 pm on weekends.

Please check back to the website http://library.uvm.edu/dana daily to see knew updates about the construction and the events going on within the Library.

– for more information please call the Circulation desk at 802-656-2200

New Authoritative List of Resources in the Health Sciences

In the early sixties a librarian named Alfred Brandon recognized the growing need for an information tool to help guide medical librarians in their collection development decisions. The “Brandon/Hill Selected List of Print Books and Journals for the Small Medical Library” was first published in 1965. From its beginnings as a core list of clinical titles for hospital libraries, the Brandon/Hill list grew to become an indispensable selection tool for small hospital libraries as well as large academic medical libraries.

With the death of Dorothy R. Hill, co-author of the “Selected List,” the final edition of the “Brandon/Hill” medical list ceased publication in 2003. In 2010, members of the Medical Library Association’s Books Panel realized the need that had arisen for a resource that could be used for collection development purposes just as the Brandon/Hill lists had been used, especially in the area of digital and online publications.

The Medical Library Association’s Master Guide to Authoritative Information Resources in the Health Sciences is that new, indispensable collection development tool for librarians. It includes over 1,600 authoritative book and serial recommendations in print, digital and online formats. The editors of the Master Guide selected 108 contributors for their subject knowledge and expertise to compile the “best titles” across 35 specialties for this unique guide.

Now, Dana Medical Library is thrilled to recognize one of their own as a contributor to The Master Guide. Frances Delwiche, MLIS, MT(ASCP) is the expert contributor of the Clinical Laboratory Science specialty section in this work, that is sure to become an updated option to the iconic Brandon/Hill Selected List.

Proposed Systematic Review Guidelines Include Librarians

Transparency, objectivity, and consistency are criteria that should form the foundation for new standards for clinical practice guidelines and systematic reviews, according to two reports recently released by the Institute of Medicine (IOM). The reports were commissioned by Congress following passage of the 2008 Medicare Improvement for Patients and Providers Act. Among other features, the reports argue for the role of medical librarians in overseeing sound literature search strategies when systematic reviews and guidelines are being developed.

With the explosion in medical literature, physicians and other health care providers have come to rely on practice guidelines and systematic reviews for their synthesis of the literature and evidence-based approach to patient care. However, the number of clinical guidelines produced has also risen substantially since the early 1990s. In fact, the National Guideline Clearinghouse and the Guidelines International Network, two premier guidelines databases, now include more than 9,500 guideline standards.

Unfortunately, the methods behind creating all these guidelines and systematic reviews vary so greatly that stakeholders have increasingly questioned their quality and reliability. Each of the two new IOM reports sets out to establish “gold standard” practices at a critical time in the health care reform movement.

A key element of both reports is an emphasis on making clinical practice guidelines more inclusive of and accessible by patients and the public. To achieve this goal, the Institute of Medicine identified eight areas for improvement of guideline development, including process transparency, disclosure of all conflicts of interest, and a rating scale for strength of recommendations among others.

The Guidelines companion report on improving systematic reviews sets a similarly high bar. The report notes that the quality of current systematic reviews varies widely from excellent to poor. To strive for quality and usability across the board, the IOM report recommends 21 standards for producing high-quality systematic reviews.

Standard 3.1 is of particular importance to the systematic review project team. The elements of this standard address conducting a comprehensive, systematic search of the literature for evidence. It specifically recognizes the importance of working with “a librarian or other information specialist trained in performing systematic reviews to plan the search strategy” (Standard 3.1.1) as well as using “an independent librarian or other information specialist to peer review the search strategy” (Standard 3.1.3).

Right now, it’s unclear how organizations that develop clinical practice guidelines and systematic reviews will handle the challenges of these new recommendations. The key goal for the Institute of Medicine continues to be restoring trust in the process of assessing medical evidence and applying that evidence to the development of quality clinical guidelines and systematic reviews.

Both Institute of Medicine reports : Clinical Practice Guidelines We Can Trust (W 84.4 AA1 I59c 2011 ) and Finding What Works in Health Care: Standards for Systematic Reviews (W 84.3 I59c 2011 ) are available at the Dana Medical Library.

Medical Library Association Webcast

Now’s the Time: Understanding the Electronic Health Record Maze and Health Sciences Librarians Roles

Program goals: To clarify the terminology surrounding the emerging electronic health information environment and to illustrate how and why health sciences librarians can and should become engaged with the efforts to achieve the national 2014 goal of instituting an electronic health record for each person in the United States.

Program Objectives:

  • To remove the ambiguity and confusion revolving around the electronic health environment. Technology, management, and the exchange of health information will be discussed.
  • To illustrate the emerging electronic health information environment by profiling working electronic medical records (EMRs), electronic health records (EHRs), and personal health records (PHRs).
  • To highlight the recent involvement health sciences librarians have had with EMRs, EHRs, and PHRs.

Program Agenda

Part I: Introduction to the Electronic Health Record (EHR) Concept
Part II: A Hands-on Look at EHR Systems
Part III: The Role of Health Sciences Librarians
Part IV: Wrap Up

The Dana Medical Library is located in the building between Fletcher Allen Hospital and UVM’s Medical Education Center.

Parking is available at FAHC, 111 Colchester Ave Burlington, VT

The webcast will be from 2-4 on Wednesday, March 24, 2010 in Room 200 of the Health Sciences Research Facility (HSRF)

Plan to arrive a little early and come to Dana; we’ll lead the way to HSRF 200.

Register online: http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/PQ8W8BQ.