Tag Archives: collections

College of Medicine Yearbooks now digital on Scholarworks

Pulse

The collection of College of Medicine yearbooks is now available for viewing and research on the UVM Scholarworks website. The yearbooks that were digitized were from the years 1952 to 1967.  Also, College of Medicine catalogs ranging from 1860 to 1993 were included in the project and can be accessed at the website as well. Funded by the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (New England Region), Dana Medical Library staff were able to start the project. Donna O’Malley, the Library Associate Professor and Systems Coordinator for the Dana Medical Library oversaw the process. The collections of yearbooks and catalogs are a great resource for exploring the history and evolution of the UVM College of Medicine.

ClinicalKey Added to Dana’s List of Databases

Clinical_Key

Dana Medical Library now provides access to ClinicalKey. Replacing MDConsult and Procedures Consult, this new Clinical Insight Engine is designed to provide clinicians with fast, clinically-relevant answers from Elsevier’s library of proprietary medical and surgical content. ClinicalKey offers access to:

  • over 1,000 Elsevier medical and surgical reference books*
  • over 500 Elsevier medical and surgical journals
  • all medical and surgical clinics of North America
  • Procedures Consult procedural videos
  • First Consult point-of-care clinical monographs
  • patient education handouts
  • additional videos and images, practice guidelines, patient handouts, and drug information.

It also supports researchers and instructors with the included presentation builder for use with ClinicalKey’s multimedia collection-export to PowerPoint. User guides are available at http://www.elsevier-data.de/ClinicalKey/ClinicalKey_user_guide.pdf.

*HTML version of chapters provided. To view PDF files you must create a FREE “User Profile” and login.

 

New Names for Archives Journals

The nine specialty Archives Journals in The JAMA Network will change their names effective Jan. 1, 2013, part of the ongoing evolution to more closely interconnect the scientific journals published by the American Medical Association.

Two of the specialty journals will see their new names shortened: the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine will become JAMA Pediatrics and the Archives of General Psychiatry will be known as JAMA Psychiatry. Other current Archives titles are Archives of Dermatology, Archives of Facial Plastic Surgery, Archives of Internal Medicine, Archives of Neurology, Archives of Ophthalmology, Archives of Otolaryngology – Head & Neck Surgery, and Archives of Surgery.

For more information, see the JAMA notice.

 

Online Journals Now “Journals of Record”

An editorial in a medical journal in 2000, opined it will be “increasingly difficult for any paper-only periodical to maintain a position as a journal of record. It is only a matter of time before electronic journals take over from paper journals as the official archive.”

Since that article was written, there has been a ground-swell of journal publishers announcing that the online version of the journal is, indeed, the “journal of record.”  BMJ, Genetics, Pediatrics, AJR, and Journal of Neuroscience have announced this transition.

One explanation for this change is that electronic journals offer advantages to the readers like instantaneous delivery of each issue (including internationally), RSS feeds, and space and storage savings.

But the main reason that online journals become the official record is due to the enhancements offered in the digital environment. Hypertext links, movies, sound, images, and supplementary tables or data are all now commonplace features.  Also, teaching points in the form of “key concepts” are frequently utilized and bulleted or color-enhanced for ease of use by instructors and students alike.

The popularity of mobile devices and e-readers may contribute to the growth of electronic titles being favored over print.

At present there is no comprehensive list of those journal publishers that have made the switch to online journals as the “journal of record.” The National Library of Medicine (NLM) offers the following guidelines on when they officially index the online version for Medline. NLM indexers:

  • try to identify when the online version of a journal has more content than the print version.
  • search for retractions, errata, and comments in a way that can be cited.

From this determination, NLM almost always indexes from the online version. When publishers are given the option of having their journals indexed from the print or online, NLM reports that “few, if any, journals have ever opted for us to index from the print version instead of the online version of the journal.”

Jeanene Light, MLS

New USMLE and Test Reviews Available

The Dana Medical Library recently added titles to the USMLE (and other examination test guides) collection, aided by recommendations from current medical students. Students provided valuable input to the library on which series and titles they found most useful. Special thanks to Kati Anderson (class of 2014) for representing the students, and for taking time from her busy schedule to meet with the Dana Collections Librarian.

Whenever possible, print titles are supplemented by licensing electronic study guides. The electronic books don’t need to be checked out (or returned!) on any specific date. Electronic titles include:

First Aid for the USMLE step 1
First Aid for the USMLE step 2
Costanzo’s Physiology in the Board Review Series
Goljan’s Pathology- Rapid Review Series
MD Consult E-book Collection of titles:
Brown: Rapid Review Physiology
Pazdernik: Rapid Review Pharmacology
Pelley: Rapid Review Biochemistry
Rosenthal: Rapid Review Microbiology and Immunology

Sample updated print titles include the latest editions of:

Katzung & Trevor’s pharmacology: examination & board review (multiple copies)
Rapid review pathology
Comprehensive psychiatry review
Clinical Microbiology Made Ridiculously Simple
High Yield Embryology

The USMLE Library Research Guide (http://danaguides.uvm.edu/usmle) provides links to many new titles, both in print and electronic versions. The list is automatically updated whenever new titles are added to the Dana collection. This guide is available on the Dana website (http://library.uvm.edu/dana) under the heading “Research Guides by Subject” and via BlackBoard.

Also, at the recommendation of students, a new policy change allows the print USMLE books to circulate from the Library. They can be checked out for a 2-hour loan, and the item can be renewed once, as long as no one else has asked for that specific item. The item can be taken overnight when borrowed within 2 hours of closing. If taken overnight, the book is due back within 30 minutes of the library opening the next day.

Whether you browse the collection in the Library, check out titles for two hour loans, or access the electronic versions, there should be something for everyone, whether studying for Step 1 of the medical licensure exam, or reviewing for other board licensure tests.

Note: Titles can be tricky to find in the online catalog. Please feel free to ask at the reference desk for assistance!

Jeanene Light, MLS

New Authoritative List of Resources in the Health Sciences

In the early sixties a librarian named Alfred Brandon recognized the growing need for an information tool to help guide medical librarians in their collection development decisions. The “Brandon/Hill Selected List of Print Books and Journals for the Small Medical Library” was first published in 1965. From its beginnings as a core list of clinical titles for hospital libraries, the Brandon/Hill list grew to become an indispensable selection tool for small hospital libraries as well as large academic medical libraries.

With the death of Dorothy R. Hill, co-author of the “Selected List,” the final edition of the “Brandon/Hill” medical list ceased publication in 2003. In 2010, members of the Medical Library Association’s Books Panel realized the need that had arisen for a resource that could be used for collection development purposes just as the Brandon/Hill lists had been used, especially in the area of digital and online publications.

The Medical Library Association’s Master Guide to Authoritative Information Resources in the Health Sciences is that new, indispensable collection development tool for librarians. It includes over 1,600 authoritative book and serial recommendations in print, digital and online formats. The editors of the Master Guide selected 108 contributors for their subject knowledge and expertise to compile the “best titles” across 35 specialties for this unique guide.

Now, Dana Medical Library is thrilled to recognize one of their own as a contributor to The Master Guide. Frances Delwiche, MLIS, MT(ASCP) is the expert contributor of the Clinical Laboratory Science specialty section in this work, that is sure to become an updated option to the iconic Brandon/Hill Selected List.