The UVM Libraries Announce ScholarWorks

Fungi

In celebration of Open Access Week 2013 (October 21st – 27th, 2013), the UVM Libraries are proud to announce ScholarWorks @ UVM, a new digital repository that provides for the organization, dissemination, and management of digital materials created by UVM faculty, staff, students, and their collaborators. Our goal is to increase access to the scholarly and creative output of the university and to preserve these works in digital form.

We invite you to look at the first collections created. You’ll find recent theses from environmental studies students, family medicine articles, library science presentations, and specimen notebooks and drawings from the Pringle Herbarium.

Most importantly, we’re hoping you’ll consider contributions of your own. ScholarWorks @ UVM can help make your increase the discoverabilty of your scholarship on the Internet.

Though the publisher’s PDF of your published article may be behind a paywall, you can make the preprint or postprint available through ScholarWorks, increasing access to your scholarship. Many leading publishers now allow the deposit of journal article preprints and postprints into the author’s institutional repository (see the Sherpa/Romeo database for a summary of publishers’ permissions. http://sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/).

Grant reports, white papers, posters, presentations, newsletters, annual reports, and other publications of enduring value can be published in ScholarWorks @ UVM. Student work, such as College Honors Theses, may also be deposited. ScholarWorks accepts materials in multiple formats, including audio and video. ScholarWorks @ UVM offers customizable web sites for conference proceedings, both to accept papers for an upcoming conference, and to display the proceedings after the event is over. Publications in ScholarWorks @ UVM are indexed by Google and Google Scholar.

For more information:
See ScholarWorks @ UVM Policies and Guidelines http://scholarworks.uvm.edu/about.html

Contact your library liaison at Bailey/Howe
http://library.uvm.edu/specialists/
or Dana Medical Library
http://library.uvm.edu/dana/about/staff/specialist.php

Contact Associate Library Professor Donna O’Malley
donna.omalley@uvm.edu, (802) 656-4415

 

 

Illustration by Charles J. Sprague from the Frost Cryptogamic Herbarium

Multimedia Workshops For All in February

media_studio

Are you creating a multimedia class project, or curious about the operating cameras and other media equipment?

On Friday, February 7, 2014, 11:30 – 12:30, student Multimedia Lab Assistants Elley and Ben will offer a workshop on our media equipment collection.  The workshop is hands-on to provide attendees with experience using equipment and computers in the Multimedia Lab.

Workshop attendees will learn:

  • How to select the best equipment for a particular project
  • How to use equipment such as digital cameras and digital camcorders
  • How to upload media  from equipment to a computer
  • How to upload and digitize media from formats such as VHS and DVD
  • How to use the importing hardware located in the Multimedia Lab

The workshops are open to the entire UVM community: staff, faculty and students alike.

Where: Bailey/Howe Library – ground level, 001B Media Classroom
When: 2/7/14 at 11:30 am  – 12:30 pm

The Multimedia Resources Department
Bailey Howe Library
Phone: 656-1947

Library Workshops

Bring your laptop and your questions to the Dana Library Classroom for library skill-building workshops. Learn how to use EndNote, brush up your lit searching skills, make a better PowerPoint presentation, and much more! New this semester are several online options and a new class called “Personal Knowledge Management: Better Organization for Better Problem-Solving.” Join us!

Who is a Medical/Health Sciences Graduate Student?

Study Seat Sign 1

From the Director:

During University exam period this past December 2013, a student wrote in the Comment Book:

Can you make sure there is room for Med students in the back part of the Library?

The writer of the comment was referring to the area at the front south end of the Dana Library that is reserved for medical, nursing and health sciences, and bio-medical graduate students. It’s true that the Library staff do not actively police the area or ask for ID’s.  But perhaps some inter-disciplinary introductions and clarification would help.  An unfamiliar person sitting near you in the area may indeed be a graduate student.

So who are the graduate students and their programs  in the biomedical and health sciences disciplines and clinical professions at UVM’s College of Medicine and College of Nursing & Health Sciences that should be studying in this area of the Library? Here is a list:

Medical Student Education (MD)
Graduate Medical Education (post-MD)
Cell, Molecular and Biological Sciences-CMBS (PhD)
Neuroscience (PhD)
Public Health (MA)
Clinical and Translational Science (MS,PhD)
Communication Science and Disorders (MS)
Nursing (MS-CNL, MS-NP, DNP)
Physical Therapy (DPT)
and Graduate Certificate in Post-Bacc Pre-Med (enrolled).

Consider saying hello to another person sitting near you in the med/ grad area. You may have more in common than you think.

If you have concerns about studying in this or any other area of the Library please let a member of the staff know so we may address it. Please leave your name and contact information.

Marianne Burke

Director, Dana Medical Library

Film Showing: Prescription Drug Addiction

HungryHeartflierforJan232014at6pm

“The Hungry Heart,” a 90-minute documentary from Kingdom County production company in Vermont, examines the world of prescription drug addiction and recovery. The film will be shown for medical students and others as space permits, on Thursday, January 23 at 6 p.m. at Carpenter Auditorium. Learn more about the film in the newest edition of Primarily Vermont.

2012 Journal Citation Reports (JCR) Now Available

Are you thinking of submitting a manuscript to Plant Cell but don’t know how high that journal is ranked in your field? Do you want to know more about the top journals in your field?

Journal Citation Reports can help! This resource allows you to evaluate and compare journals using citation data drawn from over 7,500 scholarly and technical journals from 3,300 publishers in over 60 countries. It covers the areas of science, technology and the social sciences. Journal Citation Reports displays the:

  • Most frequently cited journals in a field
  • Highest impact journals in a field
  • Largest journals in a field

Citation and article counts may indicate how frequently current researchers are using individual journals. By tabulating and aggregating citation and article counts, JCR offers one perspective for journal evaluation and comparison.

To use JCR, simply click on Articles & Databases on the home page and then go to Web of Science. Once there, click on the yellow tab at the top that reads Additional Resources. A link to Journal Citation Reports is in the upper left-hand corner.

Be aware that JCR is not the only way to evaluate a journal’s value or impact on a field. ISI, the makers of JCR, offer valuable advice on using this resource wisely, so consider reading this before you proceed.

Thanks for Another Great Funding to Publication Series

ftp

Hilda Alajajian presents “Finding Grant Opportunities: The Search Process”

Mid October represents a lot of things. The leaves are falling. Cooler weather is coming. It also marks the end of another great Funding to Publication series. Funding to Publication is a series of workshops that focus on different aspects of the research process such as tools for finding research, sources of funding, and publication strategies. This year 57 people attended one or more of the workshops, which represents an increase of 42% over last year’s series. In fact, so many people signed up for two workshops (Advanced EndNote and Sources and Databases Beyond PubMed) that we had to add a third day to fit everyone in! Thank you to everyone who attended the workshops and for your help in making it such a great experience for everyone involved. If you missed any part of the series, take a look at its site, http://danaguides.uvm.edu/research2013, for class content and supplemental materials.

Although the Funding to Publication series is over, there are still lots of workshops being offered between now and December. For example, you can learn some new tricks on using images in PowerPoint in the “An Image is Worth a Thousand Words” workshop. Additional topics include EndNote, Google Scholar, The Cochrane Library, and a great session on creating posters. You can find a list of the workshops and when they’ll be offered on the Schedule of Library Workshops page.  How to Stay Up to Date: Alerts, Preparing Posters, and Introduction to Google Scholar are new selections alongside popular standards such as Advanced EndNote and Beyond PubMed.

Don’t see what you’re looking for? Please let us know. We’re always looking for great ideas for future workshops.

Gary Atwood, MSLIS
gary.atwood@uvm.edu