Retirement in Interlibrary Loan Department

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Marie McGarry, Interlibrary Loan (ILL) Specialist, retires on February 28, 2014 after 29 years of service for the University of Vermont. Marie came to the Dana Medical Library in January of 1985. Initially working in cataloging, Marie then moved to ILL Borrowing, where she filled requests from UVM and Fletcher Allen patrons for materials to be borrowed from other libraries or institutions. Marie has borrowed books and other materials from as far away as Hong Kong and Australia, and is known for filling requests at lightning speed. ILL regularly receives requested journal articles as quickly as 4 hours after the request has been placed. Marie has been particularly good at meeting patron needs for high quality materials delivered quickly, and she does so while saving the Library money but never sacrificing quality patron service.

Many health sciences area patrons appreciate her work. In a recent survey of Dana ILL users, 87% indicated that being able to borrow materials for patient care, research or academic work was “essential”, with 13% rating it “very important.” Many respondents commented positively on Interlibrary Loan. “Being able to… request articles from the [Interlibrary Loan] service is absolutely critical to the teaching mission,” said one respondent. Another noted, “This [Interlibrary Loan] service is so efficient and reliable, I really depend on it to keep me up to date on related research, etc.” Speed of delivery was also rated as important and commented on by survey respondents. One respondent said, “I have been amazed that many of my ILL requests are filled the same day.”

Judging by patron feedback, Interlibrary Loan is an important service for all kinds of work: from student assignments to clinical practice. Dana Library is committed to continuing this high level of service, but there can be no denying that Marie has been a key member of the Interlibrary Loan team. She will be missed by colleagues and patrons alike. Dana Library faculty and staff wish her the very best in her new adventure of retirement!

Nationally Normed Survey Highlights Student and Faculty Success at Dana

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In April 2013 the Dana Medical Library and Bailey-Howe Library made the LIbQual+ Survey available to UVM and Fletcher Allen faculty, staff, and students. Thank you to the 942 individuals who completed the survey.

The Dana Medical Library is committed to providing high quality medical and health sciences information and services to our patrons. One tool available to libraries for assessing service quality is the LibQual+ Survey. The U.S. Association for Research Libraries developed and rigorously tested this web-based survey. It has been used by more than 1,200 libraries, including University of Massachusetts, Northeastern University, University of Connecticut, University of Rhode Island, and SUNY Stony Brook.

The survey asked for patrons to indicate their minimum acceptable service level, their desired service level, and the level of service they perceive for 22 attributes.

The three attributes that Dana Library patrons were most satisfied with were:

  1. Employees who are consistently courteous
  2. Willingness to help users
  3. Readiness to respond to users’ questions.

Dana Library patrons indicated that their three most desired service attributes are:

  1. Print and/or electronic journal collections I require for my work
  2. The electronic information resources I need
  3. Making electronic resources accessible from my home or office

Mean scores for Dana Library services exceeded the minimum acceptable service level for all 22 attributes, including the three most desired attributes listed above.

Dana Medical Library also has data from its 2009 LibQual+ survey. Almost all scores were higher in 2013, but two specific changes stand out. First, survey results from 2013 indicated an increased score for “Employees who have the knowledge to answer user questions.” Second, the scores for “Community space for group learning and group study,” while not large in 2009 or 2013, were higher in 2013.

Stay tuned for Dana Library’s plans to use the data from the 2013 LibQual+ Survey, including information gleaned from survey comments.

Donna O’Malley, MLS
donna.omalley@uvm.edu

Find It Yourself or Ask a Librarian? Studies show medical librarian search gets better results and reduces costs

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Health care providers are incorporating more evidence-based practice skills and information sources into their patient care. When providers recognize an uncertainty in determining a diagnosis or treatment plan, they frequently turn to available knowledge sources. At University of Vermont/Fletcher Allen Health Care many providers and professionals turn to Library–licensed sources such as UpToDate, DynaMed, and Nursing Reference Center as their first stop in finding the evidence to answer a patient care question. These sources helpfully provide the “strength of recommendation” based on accepted standards of appraisal of research studies. The typical duration of a search session on DynaMed or UpToDate is less than five minutes, which is manageable at or near the point of care. When those sources do not answer the question adequately either because the latest findings are too new, or because the patient situation and values are too complex, clinicians often seek the primary literature through PubMed. In doing so, some find the search frustrating and time-consuming. If you are among those who need a potentially time-consuming and complex search of the primary literature, consider requesting a literature search from Dana Library medical librarians.

In a randomized trial, information retrieval searches performed by a medical librarian for complex clinical questions were faster and retrieved more favorable results when compared to physician self-searches. The librarians answered the question in 13 minutes compared to 20 minutes for physicians searching on their own. The physicians reported that the librarian results contained a higher level of evidence and had a greater impact on patient care than physician self-searches.1

In a controlled study, patient cases were presented at morning report with a medical librarian in attendance. The librarian performed a literature search on questions that arose and disseminated the findings to the attending physician and presenting resident. The control patients were drawn from patient records and matched for age and primary and secondary diagnoses. The study results included association with reduced hospital length of stay (LOS) for the case group. LOS differed by 2 days between matched cases and controls (3 days vs. 5 days, P < 0.024). Median total hospital charges were $7,045 for the intervention group, and $10,663 for the control group. 2

In these studies, the librarian-conducted literature search saved physician time, reduced hospital costs, and may have improved patient outcomes. UVM and Fletcher Allen physicians, residents, nurses, therapists, and others may receive help finding the literature to answer clinical questions, develop guidelines, and do background research for presentations. To request a literature search or consultation, go to Ask a Librarian on the Dana website to get help by phone, email, or in person.

1. McGowan J, Hogg W, Campbell C, Rowan M. Just-in-time information improved decision-making in primary care: a randomized controlled trial. PLoS ONE. 2008;3(11):e3785.

2. Banks DE, Shi R, Timm DF, et al. Decreased hospital length of stay associated with presentation of cases at morning report with librarian support. J Med Libr Assoc. Oct 2007;95(4):381-387.

Marianne Burke, MLS AHIP
Director, Dana Medical Library
marianne.burke@uvm.edu

Exhibit Explores Generations in Medicine

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The Dana Medical Library is currently displaying an exhibit that honors multi-generation physician families in Vermont. “Multi-Generation Vermont Physician Families: Graduates of the UVM College of Medicine” highlights the Bove, Irwin, Terrien, and Upton families and is on view until April. Stop by the Library to view this informative exhibit.

ClinicalKey Added to Dana’s List of Databases

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Dana Medical Library now provides access to ClinicalKey. Replacing MDConsult and Procedures Consult, this new Clinical Insight Engine is designed to provide clinicians with fast, clinically-relevant answers from Elsevier’s library of proprietary medical and surgical content. ClinicalKey offers access to:

  • over 1,000 Elsevier medical and surgical reference books*
  • over 500 Elsevier medical and surgical journals
  • all medical and surgical clinics of North America
  • Procedures Consult procedural videos
  • First Consult point-of-care clinical monographs
  • patient education handouts
  • additional videos and images, practice guidelines, patient handouts, and drug information.

It also supports researchers and instructors with the included presentation builder for use with ClinicalKey’s multimedia collection-export to PowerPoint. User guides are available at http://www.elsevier-data.de/ClinicalKey/ClinicalKey_user_guide.pdf.

*HTML version of chapters provided. To view PDF files you must create a FREE “User Profile” and login.

 

UpToDate Goes Anywhere… and Everywhere!

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The UVM Libraries/FAHC-licensed UpToDate goes anywhere and everywhere!

This new version, called UpToDate Anywhere, allows full access to UpToDate at UVM, Fletcher Allen Health Care, all FAHC practice sites… and from anywhere with an Internet connection.

To take advantage of UpToDate Anywhere, users must first register an individual account from within the UVM or FAHC networks. These networks include accessing UpToDate:

  • while at UVM;
  • while at FAHC;
  • remotely with EZ Proxy or VPN;
  • through FAHC’s Remote Access Gateway;
  • on the UVM wireless network;
  • or on FAHC’s employee wireless network (NOT the FAHC guest wireless network).

With this account, UpToDate can then be accessed anywhere just by logging in with the registered user name and password. The account also enables users to accrue CME credits for reading UpToDate articles, and to download an UpToDate app to a mobile device.

Directions for downloading and installing the iPhone/iPad/iPod Touch and Android versions of the mobile app are available at http://danaguides.uvm.edu/mobile. A more detailed description of UpToDate Anywhere can be found here: http://danaguides.uvm.edu/uptodate.

As usual, if you have any questions or concerns, please do not hesitate to contact the Library at 802-656-2201 or danaref@uvm.edu.

Favorite Dana Databases and Services

Which of the links on the Dana Medical Library home page are the most popular? Preliminary annualized data indicate that patrons visiting the Dana home page are most likely to click on links for PubMed, UpToDate, and the link to the page that lists all health sciences Articles & Databases. See the table below for more of the most popular databases and web pages.

Webfavorite

On the flip side, the following pages received fewer than 100 clicks: Renew a Book, Recommend a Purchase, For Users with Special Needs, and most of the links under UVM Libraries & Collections. The data are tentative at this point and based on combination of estimates and extrapolations. We will continue to gather this data to help us focus the web site on the needs of our patrons.

Top Dana Research Guides for 2013

Research guides developed by Dana Librarians help you find key resources for your area of interest. Some guides focus on a clinical specialty, while others focus on types of resources, such as mobile apps or study guides. The Mobile Apps subject guide was the most popular subject guide on the Dana website in FY’13. See a full list of research guides for health sciences here (http://researchguides.uvm.edu/dana).

    Top Dana Subject Guides (July 1, 2012-June 30, 2013)

Subject Guide

Views

Mobile Apps

4125

Nursing Resources for Clinical Practice

3061

Anatomy of a Scholarly Journal Article

2855

Clinical Care

1973

USMLE Study Guides

1461

Family Medicine

1391

Endnote and EndNote Web

1048

Anesthesiology

1023

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CNHS Student Survey Results: “The atmosphere focuses me….”

In the spring of 2013, Librarians Frances Delwiche and Gary Atwood surveyed students in the College of Nursing and Health Sciences (CNHS). The eleven-question survey asked students about how they spent their time in the library as well as their level of satisfaction with library space, services and resources. Generally speaking, results show that CNHS students have a very positive view of the physical library and the resources and services that are offered.

Students were also asked to submit comments about the library. One of the major themes to emerge from these comments is the idea of the library as a refuge for serious study. In many cases, students cited specific attributes like the “comfy chairs” or the study tables as factors that contributed to this sentiment. Others referred to more intangible factors such as the lighting or the “sense of openness.” Students were equally pleased with the library’s resources with several mentioning online journals and e-books as important. They were also complimentary about library services such as the “incredibly helpful and patient” librarians at the Reference Desk and the staff who are, “ALWAYS willing to help.”

“You know you mean business when you walk in. No messing around at the Dana. You can always get work done there.”

Even when students did register complaints, they were usually tied to something that they liked about the library. In other words, students would cite a positive library characteristic and then request more of the same when asked about what they would change. Several respondents, for example, stated that they preferred to use the individual study carrels located near the back of the library and wished that they library would install more to ensure availability. From the library’s point of view, this is actually a very positive statement, because it shows that we are providing access to resources that students need and want to use.

Although we only heard from a sample of the CNHS students, the results were very important. They show that the library is having a positive impact by providing students with a space conducive to serious study and the resources and service to help them complete their work. Of course, they also show areas where we need to continue improving, which we are committed to doing in the months and years ahead.

The UVM Libraries Announce ScholarWorks

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In celebration of Open Access Week 2013 (October 21st – 27th, 2013), the UVM Libraries are proud to announce ScholarWorks @ UVM, a new digital repository that provides for the organization, dissemination, and management of digital materials created by UVM faculty, staff, students, and their collaborators. Our goal is to increase access to the scholarly and creative output of the university and to preserve these works in digital form.

We invite you to look at the first collections created. You’ll find recent theses from environmental studies students, family medicine articles, library science presentations, and specimen notebooks and drawings from the Pringle Herbarium.

Most importantly, we’re hoping you’ll consider contributions of your own. ScholarWorks @ UVM can help make your increase the discoverabilty of your scholarship on the Internet.

Though the publisher’s PDF of your published article may be behind a paywall, you can make the preprint or postprint available through ScholarWorks, increasing access to your scholarship. Many leading publishers now allow the deposit of journal article preprints and postprints into the author’s institutional repository (see the Sherpa/Romeo database for a summary of publishers’ permissions. http://sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/).

Grant reports, white papers, posters, presentations, newsletters, annual reports, and other publications of enduring value can be published in ScholarWorks @ UVM. Student work, such as College Honors Theses, may also be deposited. ScholarWorks accepts materials in multiple formats, including audio and video. ScholarWorks @ UVM offers customizable web sites for conference proceedings, both to accept papers for an upcoming conference, and to display the proceedings after the event is over. Publications in ScholarWorks @ UVM are indexed by Google and Google Scholar.

For more information:
See ScholarWorks @ UVM Policies and Guidelines http://scholarworks.uvm.edu/about.html

Contact your library liaison at Bailey/Howe
http://library.uvm.edu/specialists/
or Dana Medical Library
http://library.uvm.edu/dana/about/staff/specialist.php

Contact Associate Library Professor Donna O’Malley
donna.omalley@uvm.edu, (802) 656-4415

 

 

Illustration by Charles J. Sprague from the Frost Cryptogamic Herbarium