Category Archives: Archive

Workshop on How to Search Google Scholar

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Wednesday, May 25, 2016; Noon – 1:00 pm

Google Scholar is a freely accessible web search engine that indexes the full text of scholarly literature with many irresistible features along with some definite challenges. Come learn how to make Scholar an important tool in your clinical or research toolkit. Instructor: Gary Atwood, MLIS

Workshops are open to all UVM and University of Vermont Medical Center students, staff, and faculty. Unless otherwise noted, preregistration is not required for library workshops. Questions about any of our workshops? Not affiliated with UVM or University of Vermont Medical Center? Please contact Gary Atwood at gatwood@uvm.edu or (802) 656-4488.

Whiteboard Survey: Students Weigh-in on Study Space

Furniture survey board image resizedIn February, Library staff conducted a whiteboard survey in the space where the Reference Desk once resided. With the removal of the Desk, this empty space was re-claimed as study space, and now it needed furniture! Who better to ask about usable and comfortable furniture than our very own patrons? Library patrons were asked to share their thoughts on the whiteboard to the following two questions:

What kind of furniture would you like in this area? The choices were: Carrels, Lounge Chairs, Lounge Chairs with Laptop Desks, Round Tables, Rectangular Tables.

Comments or other suggestions?

The most popular response came from the Comments question. Twenty-one respondents indicated that they would prefer standing desks. The next most popular response was rectangular tables (19), followed by lounge chairs (9) and lounge chairs with desks (8). Only five people wanted to see carrels in this area. No one was a fan of round tables.

Other popular survey suggestions included a fish tank, massage chairs, and kittens and puppies. Another idea was to move all the chairs against the wall from the former Reference area, and fill in the center with tables.

As a result of the survey, we have rearranged the existing furniture as suggested and added another rectangular table. We are in the process of scheduling more visits from Tucker the therapy dog. And we are investigating using our mobile monitor to display a fish tank video when it is not in use elsewhere. Survey feedback will also inform future decisions about purchasing furniture for the Dana Library. As a reminder, the Main Desk has nine portable stand-up desks that can be checked out.

More questions or comments? Contact Lesley Boucher at 656-4404.

NLM Exhibit on the History of Drugs and Addiction now open at Dana

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Crack is Wack playground mural, Keith Haring, 1986 Courtesy © Keith Haring Foundation and Jonathan Kuhn/New York City Parks & Recreation

Through June 10th, The Dana Medical Library is hosting the National Library of Medicine Traveling Exhibition Pick Your Poison: Intoxicating Pleasures and Medical Prescriptions. Mind-altering drugs have been used throughout the history of America. While some remain socially acceptable, others are outlawed because of their toxic, and intoxicating, characteristics. These classifications have shifted at different times in history, and will continue to change. The transformation of a particular drug, from an acceptable indulgence to a bad habit, or vice versa, is closely tied to the intentions of those endorsing its use, and their status in society. This exhibition explores some of the factors that have shaped the changing definition of some of our most potent drugs, from medical miracle to social menace.

This exhibition was developed and produced by the National Library of Medicine, National Institute of Health. For more information, contact Kate Bright at 656-0695.

May brings Dana Workshops on Systematic Reviews and More!

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Join us all month long in the Dana Classroom for Workshops on important library resources and databases!

Searching for Systematic Reviews Wednesday, May 4th, Noon – 1:00 pm

Systematic reviews summarize, appraise, and interpret evidence from healthcare research, primarily from journal articles. They can be the most efficient way to bring the results of clinical research into clinical decision making. This workshop will explore databases and methodologies for locating high-quality systematic reviews. Instructor: Donna O’Malley, MLS

Introduction to EndNote Wednesday, May 11th,  Noon – 1:00 pm

This beginning EndNote class will get you started with using this powerful reference management software. You’ll learn how easy it is to export citations from popular online databases and automatically insert them into your paper or manuscript. Instructor: Frances Delwiche, MLIS

How to Search Google Scholar Wednesday, May 25, Noon – 1:00 pm

Google Scholar is a freely accessible web search engine that indexes the full text of scholarly literature with many irresistible features along with some definite challenges. Come learn how to make Scholar an important tool in your clinical or research toolkit. Instructor: Gary Atwood, MLIS

Workshops are open to all UVM and University of Vermont Medical Center students, staff, and faculty. Unless otherwise noted, preregistration is not required for library workshops. Questions about any of our workshops? Not affiliated with UVM or University of Vermont Medical Center? Please contact Gary Atwood at gatwood@uvm.edu or (802) 656-4488.

Systematic Reviews 101: A New Workshop Series at Dana Medical Library

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Systematic reviews are an integral component of evidence-based healthcare, but they can be hard to define. According to the Cochrane Library, a systematic review “is a high-level overview of primary research on a particular research question that tries to identify, select, synthesize and appraise all high quality research evidence relevant to that question in order to answer it.” (http://community-archive.cochrane.org/about-us/evidence-based-health-care) Like all quality research studies, the protocol used to conduct a systematic review must be spelled out in advance to minimize bias and to ensure that the review can be replicated by another group. Because of the rigor involved, systematic reviews can take several months to complete and usually involve two or more researchers. When done correctly, however, they can provide very reliable evidence for health care providers.

A quick search of PubMed shows that approximately 223 healthcare related systematic reviews have been completed here at the University of Vermont and more are ongoing. In an effort to support these projects, Dana Medical Library offered a series of three systematic review workshops this spring:

  • Introduction to Systematic Reviews – led by Donna O’Malley and Gary Atwood, provided an overview of the elements that make up a systematic review and some of the issues that researchers encounter.
  • Searching for Systematic Reviews – led by Donna O’Malley, showed researchers how to find existing systematic reviews for review.
  • Going Gray: How to Find Gray Literature – led by Nancy Bianchi and Gary Atwood, outlined the role that gray literature plays in the systematic review process and reviewed potential sources that researchers can search.

The workshops were attended by faculty members, researchers, and students – many of whom are either at the initial stages of their own systematic review or anticipating one in the not too distant future.

Given the positive reaction to this first round of systematic review workshops, the Reference Librarians at Dana hope to offer them again in the future. Of course, researchers can also contact their liaison for help with their own research in the meantime.

For more information contact Gary Atwood at 656-4488.

Thinking Locally, Acting Globally: Global Health at the University of Vermont

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Maasai patients, Tanzania

The Dana Medical Library has refreshed its Global Health exhibit! Continuing its exploration of the theme of global health at UVM, the exhibit takes a closer look at the programs that have developed in affiliation with UVM departments and colleges. With input from enthusiastic physicians, nurses, professors and students, the library has created a display that highlights the mission of global health initiatives on a broad scale as well as looks at the focus of each program. From physical therapy study abroad programs, global medical research projects, and missions to improve women’s health globally, this exhibit shows the breadth of what participants experience, the work that they strive to accomplish and the principles behind each mission.

Each of the four panels of the new exhibit highlight a different aspect of global health at UVM, beginning with its definition.

What is Global Health?

In the simplest terms, Global Health refers to the health and well-being of people and communities on a global level. It is the idea that the health of individuals and communities has a direct effect on the health of the world as a whole.

Global Health Anthropology

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Shanghai, China

Professor Jeanne Shea in the Anthropology Department has conducted research in China that combines anthropology and global health.  Her work explores issues that are intergenerational touching on topics about gender, health and healing, development and aging, and the lifecycle.

Women’s Health around the World

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Ultrasound, Tanzania

Dr. Anne Dougherty has established connections in Uganda and Tanzania working to “raise the standard of women’s healthcare globally through education, research and capacity building” and “develop(ing) skilled, culturally compassionate women’s health care providers here and abroad” (Dougherty).

Physical Therapy down under

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PT students in Australia

Professors Karen Westervelt and Sonya Worth have created a study abroad program that encourages the exchange of quality resources and education by partnering with Universities in Australia and New Zealand in the field of Physical Therapy.

Collaboration is at the root of these programs in global health. It is one that encourages the exchange of information. Physicians, nurses, students and professors, when they travel to other countries, collaborate with local hospitals, organizations, universities and health care professionals to determine what is needed to improve the health of their community or to encourage and broaden education globally.

Global Health Resources at Dana

Did you know that the library has a global health database available? Learn more about it in the exhibit.

The exhibit will remain up until the end of April. Enjoy!

Questions? Please contact Kate Bright at 656-0695.

Dana’s April Workshops: Mark your calendar!

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Come join us all month long in the Dana Classroom for workshops on important library resources and databases!

How to Search Google Scholar

Wednesday, April 6, Noon – 1:00pm

Google Scholar is a freely accessible web search engine that indexes the full text of scholarly literature with many irresistible features along with some definite challenges. Come learn how to make Scholar an important tool in your clinical or research toolkit. Instructor: Alice Stokes

Introduction to EndNote

Wednesday, April 13, Noon – 1:00 pm

This beginning EndNote class will get you started with using this powerful reference management software. You’ll learn how easy it is to export citations from popular online databases and automatically insert them into your paper or manuscript. Instructor: Frances Delwiche

PubMed: Basics & Beyond

Wednesday, April 20, Noon – 1:00 pm

Are your PubMed skills a little rusty? Come to this workshop and brush up on the basics such as using limits and MeSH headings to zero in on the results you need. We’ll move beyond the basics by answering whatever questions you have so come prepared to share! Instructor: Fred Pond

Searching CINAHL

Wednesday, April 27, Noon – 1:00 pm

This workshop will cover how to find high quality nursing and allied health information in CINAHL. In it, we’ll cover topics like advanced searching, how to use subject headings in your search, and how to fine-tune your results. Instructor: Fred Pond

Workshops are open to all UVM and University of Vermont Medical Center students, staff, and faculty. Unless otherwise noted, preregistration is not required for library workshops. Questions about any of our workshops? Not affiliated with UVM or University of Vermont Medical Center? Please contact Gary Atwood at (802) 656-4488.

Don’t forget about Dana’s Interlibrary Loan Service!

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Joanne Montanye and Elinor Avery, our Interlibrary Loan staff.

Having trouble finding something? Make sure to take advantage of Dana’s Interlibrary Loan services. Our staff is available to help you with your search.

Here are the specifics of this great service:

Interlibrary Loan (ILL) provides access to journal articles, books, and audiovisual materials that are not available in the Dana Medical Library. ILL is different from Document Delivery in that Document Delivery is a service that supplies journal articles and book chapters from our own collection.

Dana Medical Library provides free Interlibrary Loan to UVM health, biomedical, and medical students, and to University of Vermont Medical Center residents. We also provide 25 free Interlibrary Loans per semester to UVM faculty and staff and to University of Vermont Medical Center employees. After this there is a $5.00 per item charge.

Learn more on Dana’s Interlibrary Loan webpage.

How to request an Interlibrary Loan:

You can request an ILL by filling out the online form, sending an e-mail, phoning (802) 656-4382, or sending a FAX to 656-0762.

We can send documents to you by email, through campus mail or U.S. Mail, or by fax. For items which need to be picked up, we can notify you by phone or email. Office hours are Monday – Friday 8:00 am – 4:00 pm.

Check out Dana’s Interlibrary Loan YouTube video for step-by-step instructions.

Dana Medical Librarian in Peru

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Fred Pond and Laurie Kutner (center) with their PUCP colleagues in March 2016.

Dana Medical Librarian Fred Pond just returned from a visit to the Pontifical Catholic University of Peru (PUCP) in Lima, Peru. As part of a larger collaborative relationship between UVM and PUCP, this was Fred’s second visit, which coincides with a Latin American conference for University libraries. In September 2015, Fred, along with UVM Libraries’ Dean, Mara Saule, and Bailey/Howe’s Laurie Kutner, visited PUCP to participate in intensive workshops and meetings that centered on how to make the University’s extensive library resources more discoverable to patrons.
Learn more about these visits to Peru in the December 2015 ALA International Leads Newsletter.

Wheelchair donated to Saint Albans Museum

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Director Marianne Burke and Library Assistant Kate Bright with Alex Lehning Director at St. Albans

The Dana Medical Library recently donated an antique wheelchair to the Saint Albans Museum. The staff in Saint Albans are excited to have this new addition to their medical collection. Dana faculty and staff are happy that the chair will be properly displayed.

The wheelchair was originally manufactured by The Gendron Wheel Co. Factory of Toledo, Ohio. Having a long history, The Gendron Wheel Co. began making wheels and children’s toys in the late 19th century, produced bicycles in the early 20th century, and later, wheelchairs and wheeled stretchers during World War II. We assume that our donated chair is from this latter era.

Description Made out of wood and metal; the top of the back is rounded; caned back and seat; 3 metal wheels, 2 large on the sides and 1 small in the back; metal supports and wooden foot rest.
Who The UVM Libraries’ Dana Medical Library donated this wheelchair to the St. Albans Museum, a community non-profit, who had expressed an interest in the chair.
Why The library does not have a proper place to display the wheelchair. Due to its age, it cannot be used or sat in. The wheelchair has no known history to mark it as a significant piece. We wanted it to go somewhere where it would be displayed and valued rather than stored away.
More on the Medical History Collection
The Medical History Collection at Dana Medical Library contains monographs, manuscripts, photographs, yearbooks, course catalogs, serials, doctors’ bags and instruments relating to medicine and science. To access or learn more about this Collection, contact Marianne Burke at 656-3483.