Category Archives: Spotlight

Dana’s Main Desk: A Central Location for all Library Services

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For those of you returning from break or beginning your journey as a student, faculty member or medical professional, all the services that you expect from your medical library are available to you through the Main Desk:

The Main Desk is the source for answers to a wide range of questions. Switching to a single service location maximizes library space and better serves patron needs while becoming the central point for help, information, and services at the Library. Stop at the Main Desk to find an e-journal or get started on a PubMed or CatQuest search on your topic!

The Main Desk is the place to go for curriculum support. Access and place materials on reserve, request articles through electronic article delivery and interlibrary loan, gain support for research, get help with database navigation and reserve group study spaces. Also, check out books, media and print journals and borrow supplies like ethernet & power cables, standup desks, white boards & markers, and headphones.

Get help with technology for printing, scanning, copying, public computers, wireless access, and referral to external IT support. In addition, the library has a lost and found and can provide emergency cleanup supplies.

A medical librarian is at hand for research support. Although the word “Reference” may not be used any longer, an on-demand librarian assistance service is available through the Main Desk. Get focused attention for your individual or group research. Help from librarians is available on a walk-in basis 10 am to 4 pm each weekday. Or make an appointment on the Library’s webpage. Meet some of our Research Support Librarians:

Dana removed its Reference Desk after carefully researching the library literature and conducting wide-ranging discussions among Library faculty and staff. The Circulation Desk then morphed into the central location for all services and became the Main Desk.

Staffed by Lesley Boucher (supervisor), John Printon, Brenda Nelson, Colin McClung and Craig Chalone, with the help of student assistants, the Main Desk is the place to find help for all your library needs. Contact them at 656-2200 to get started.

One More Time Or The Secret to Unlimited Library Renewals

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Due dates are stamped on all library items when you check them out of the library.  You, the borrower, are responsible to know when the item is due after that.  The library does everything it can to send Courtesy Notices before an item is due, Overdue Notices after the due date has passed, and finally a Bill Notice once an item is ‘lost’.  The library does not like having to send the last type any more than you like getting them!  The easiest, fastest and overall best way to avoid notices is to renew your items.  The library has several ways to do that:

Email, Call the Main Desk at 656-2200, or go to our website under Services: Renew a Book.

The majority of circulating materials have a ‘limit’ of three renewals.  After that you need to bring the item back to the library to be renewed.  Three renewals for a book stacks book means that you could effectively have an item for four months before having to renew it in person with the item in hand.  We want you to think about if you are actively using the materials after that time, or if they can be returned to the library and be available to other library users.  Library materials stay in use this way, rather than stored in a locker, left on a desk, or hidden under some piece of furniture, which ultimately leads to some items getting lost.

Renewals can be blocked if you have overdue fines, billed items or if another person has Recalled the materials.  Otherwise you have access to unlimited library renewals.

Current and Bestselling Books Highlighted in Summer Reading Exhibit

At Dana, we encounter a fascinating intersection of literature, medicine and science. The new exhibit that is now up in our display cases, Medicine, Science and Literature: Reading for the Summer Months, examines a special collection of books that strays away from the clinical. Instead, these literary works – fiction, nonfiction, memoirs, poetry, essays –  can inspire and encourage health care professionals, and the greater public, to take a deeper look into life and to explore topics that are both age old and cutting edge. The books being showcased are only the most current and bestselling and we encourage you to stop by and pick one up!

Here are four books that are worth a closer look:Dreamland Quinones resized

Dreamland: The True Tale of America’s Opiate Epidemic, by Sam Quinones, is a startling account of the opiate epidemic facing America today. An epidemic that was quietly fueled by pharmaceutical companies and doctors who treated pain pills as wonder drugs and by enterprising Mexican drug traffickers who supplied heroin on demand to desperate opiate addicts.

Gene Mukherjee resizedFrom the Pulitzer Prize-winning, bestselling author of The Emperor of All MaladiesThe Gene: An Intimate History, by Siddhartha Mukherjee, is a magnificent history of the gene and a response to the defining question of the future: What becomes of being human when we learn to “read” and “write” our own genetic information? A #1 New York Times Bestseller – Amazon

Lab Girl Jahren resizedLab Girl, by Hope Jahren, is a book about work, love, and the mountains that can be moved when those two things come together. It is told through Jahren’s remarkable stories: about her childhood in rural Minnesota with an uncompromising mother and a father who encouraged hours of play in his classroom’s labs; about how she found a sanctuary in science, and learned to perform lab work done “with both the heart and the hands”; and about the inevitable disappointments, but also the triumphs and exhilarating discoveries, of scientific work. – Amazon

Gratitude Sacks resizedGratitude is a collection of essays from Oliver Sacks’ last 2 years of life. “Oliver Sacks was like no other clinician, or writer. He was drawn to the homes of the sick, the institutions of the most frail and disabled, the company of the unusual and the ‘abnormal.’ He wanted to see humanity in its many variants and to do so in his own, almost anachronistic way—face to face, over time, away from our burgeoning apparatus of computers and algorithms. And, through his writing, he showed us what he saw.” – Atul Gawande, author of Being Mortal 

Questions about the exhibit? Contact Kate Bright at 656-0695. To check out a book, contact or stop by the Main Desk (656-2200).