Category Archives: Events

It’s Not Too Late to Win a Current, Popular Book!

books for drawing resized

A good book is a great escape from studying and research… and we’re giving them away! We have decided to extend our Summer Reading program to include the month September. So, if you haven’t quite finished the book that you have been working on, there is still time! Read a book and write a review about it, or tell us your thoughts in a quick survey about the summer reading exhibit. You will be entered into a drawing for popular reading books!

We all need a break from our work occasionally. One great way is to pick up a good book… and possibly win one too! Here is how it works:

Peruse the popular reading books that are on the table in Dana’s Main Hall. Check out a book that interests you, read it, and write a review about it on the card that is inside the cover of the book. Slip it into the survey and review box the next time you are in the library. You will automatically be entered into a drawing for one of these popular reading titles: When Breath Becomes Air, by Paul Kalanithi, Into the Magic Shop, by James Doty, and Lab Girl, by Hope Jahren.

You can also take a few moments to fill out our survey that is on the display table in Dana’s Main Hall. Slip it into the survey and review box and automatically be entered into the same drawing.

This summer has seen a great interest in the books in our display. Here are some of the most popular so far: Both Into the Magic Shop, by James Doty and Lab Girl, by Hope Jahren have circulated 7 times, Me Before You, by Jojo Moyes circulated 5 times, and The Gene: An Intimate History, by Siddhartha Mukherjee 4 times.

Questions? Contact Kate Bright at 656-0695.

Current and Bestselling Books Highlighted in Summer Reading Exhibit

At Dana, we encounter a fascinating intersection of literature, medicine and science. The new exhibit that is now up in our display cases, Medicine, Science and Literature: Reading for the Summer Months, examines a special collection of books that strays away from the clinical. Instead, these literary works – fiction, nonfiction, memoirs, poetry, essays –  can inspire and encourage health care professionals, and the greater public, to take a deeper look into life and to explore topics that are both age old and cutting edge. The books being showcased are only the most current and bestselling and we encourage you to stop by and pick one up!

Here are four books that are worth a closer look:Dreamland Quinones resized

Dreamland: The True Tale of America’s Opiate Epidemic, by Sam Quinones, is a startling account of the opiate epidemic facing America today. An epidemic that was quietly fueled by pharmaceutical companies and doctors who treated pain pills as wonder drugs and by enterprising Mexican drug traffickers who supplied heroin on demand to desperate opiate addicts.

Gene Mukherjee resizedFrom the Pulitzer Prize-winning, bestselling author of The Emperor of All MaladiesThe Gene: An Intimate History, by Siddhartha Mukherjee, is a magnificent history of the gene and a response to the defining question of the future: What becomes of being human when we learn to “read” and “write” our own genetic information? A #1 New York Times Bestseller – Amazon

Lab Girl Jahren resizedLab Girl, by Hope Jahren, is a book about work, love, and the mountains that can be moved when those two things come together. It is told through Jahren’s remarkable stories: about her childhood in rural Minnesota with an uncompromising mother and a father who encouraged hours of play in his classroom’s labs; about how she found a sanctuary in science, and learned to perform lab work done “with both the heart and the hands”; and about the inevitable disappointments, but also the triumphs and exhilarating discoveries, of scientific work. – Amazon

Gratitude Sacks resizedGratitude is a collection of essays from Oliver Sacks’ last 2 years of life. “Oliver Sacks was like no other clinician, or writer. He was drawn to the homes of the sick, the institutions of the most frail and disabled, the company of the unusual and the ‘abnormal.’ He wanted to see humanity in its many variants and to do so in his own, almost anachronistic way—face to face, over time, away from our burgeoning apparatus of computers and algorithms. And, through his writing, he showed us what he saw.” – Atul Gawande, author of Being Mortal 

Questions about the exhibit? Contact Kate Bright at 656-0695. To check out a book, contact or stop by the Main Desk (656-2200).