Create Origami Butterflies to Support COTS

Dana Medical library has set up an origami butterfly-making station at the front of the library in support of COTS, the Committee on Temporary Shelter, Burlington.  Take a break from your studies and research to help out by folding a few butterflies!

Why Butterflies? A note from COTS:

In honor of our annual Walk and the opening of our newly renovated program facility, we are celebrating “transformations” and “second chances,” as symbolized by the butterfly.
“I think that by our COTS Walk, my office will be filled to the brim with origami butterflies,” Community Outreach and Volunteer Specialist Sian Leach said.

We’re calling this: The Butterfly Project.
Our goal: Fold 3,500 origami butterflies – 100 butterflies for each of COTS’ 35 years of service to people who are homeless or at risk of homelessness in our community. Enable hope. Empower transformation.
Guests in our program shelters and services, volunteers, staff, and various groups have already folded more than 1,000 origami butterflies, and, nothing would make us happier than to blow long past our original goal of 3,500 butterflies!
Would it be too much to hope to reach 30,000 butterflies, with each butterfly representing a person helped by COTS over our 35-year history? Want to help us try? We’ve already filed paperwork to be considered for a new Guinness book of world record for most origami butterflies.
As for the plans with the butterflies, we aim to display them at the COTS Walk and in our new building, said Gillian Taylor, our Development Database Manager. “We’re actually hoping to work with local artists to create an aesthetically pleasing view of them.”

COTS welcomes anyone interested in creating origami butterflies to participate. All colors, types, sizes of paper butterflies are invited.

More about COTS:
COTS, the Committee on Temporary Shelter, Burlington, is the largest service provider for the homeless and those at risk of becoming homeless in Vermont.
Becoming Homeless
There are many misconceptions about what causes homelessness. While the root causes are many and varied, it is surprisingly easy for people to become homeless if they have no savings or family to lean on for help. Here is a real-life example based on a working, two-parent household that ended up living in shelter at COTS in late 2008.

ON THE EDGE, SCRAPING BY IN VERMONT: ONE FAMILY’S STORY OF HOMELESSNESS
Steve and Alice Jones have two kids, ages 7 and 9, and have lived in their apartment in Burlington for seven years.  Steve works 40 hours a week at an auto parts store and Alice works as a teacher’s aide at a local school.

Their monthly budget (wages are based on $9 and $11/hrly wages)
THE FALL
Alice hurts her back helping a disabled student and has to stop working. As an hourly employee, she does not qualify for disability benefits. She cannot work for four months.

She and Steve do the best they can, but they fall behind in their rent payments. They are unable to catch up and now they have credit card debt because they used a cash advance to help pay for their monthly expenses.
Three months after Alice stops working, their landlord begins the eviction process. The Jones family receives notification from the sheriff that they must vacate their apartment. They arrive that same day at a COTS family shelter.

STEVE AND ALICE’S STORY IS NOT UNIQUE
On any given payday, thousands of working families are struggling to balance increasing expenses against flat or falling wages.  One unforeseen expense — a medical emergency, a drop in wages or a major car repair — can result in a desperate financial situation, which can lead to a family’s becoming homeless.
*The average fair market rent for a 2-bedroom apartment in Chittenden County is $1,015 — 44% higher than the national average. Wages required to afford that rent are $19.48 an hour or $40,518 a year.
VERMONT HAS THE HIGHEST RATE OF HOMELESSNESS IN NEW ENGLAND; AT LEAST 66% OF VERMONT HOUSEHOLDS DO NOT EARN ENOUGH TO AFFORD THE AVERAGE FAIR MARKET RENT.

For more information, contact Laura Haines at 656-4143.

UVM Libraries Celebrate Fair Use Week! February 20th – 24th

What is Fair Use/Fair Dealing Week?

Fair Use/Fair Dealing Week is an annual celebration of the important doctrines of fair use in the United States and fair dealing in Canada and other jurisdictions. Under these terms, copyrighted materials are allowed use without permission from the copyright holder under certain circumstances. Fair use is one of the traditional safety valves intended to balance the interests of copyright holders with the public interest in the wider distribution and use of creative works by allowing certain limited uses that might otherwise be considered infringement.

While students, faculty, librarians, journalists, and all users of copyrighted material employ fair use and fair dealing on a daily basis, Fair Use/Fair Dealing Week celebrates this important right.

How do you determine fair use in your research or education?

To determine if a use is “fair use”, there are typically four factors used to evaluate the work in question. Read more, and find more information, about these four factors at the University of Texas Libraries website page on Fair Use. Here is an infographic that points out Myths and Facts about Fair Use.

Contact Jeanene Light at 656-0521 with questions about Fair Use Week at UVM.

Statistics Help Available at Dana

Alan Howard, M.S. Biostatistics, from UVM Statistical Software Support and Consulting Services, is available to assist students and faculty with statistics and data methods questions. He will be holding open hours at Dana Medical Library from 2 to 4 pm on Tuesdays and Thursdays. Email Alan to make an appointment or stop by with your questions.

For more information, go to the Statistical Software Support and Consulting Services link on the UVM Libraries website.

Follow Dana Medical Library on Social Media!

As part of the UVM Libraries system, Dana posts weekly about library events, news, and services on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. You can find links to UVM Libraries social media at the top of Dana’s Homepage. We also keep up-to-date on news from our medical and science community: the Larner College of Medicine, the College of Nursing and Health Sciences, and the UVM Medical Center. We make a point to like, re-post, and share the news that is important to you! Following UVM Libraries is a great way to keep informed about everything that is happening in your medical library as well as in your medical community. Helpful hint: Along with regular updates on the current library renovation project, we will give you tips on how to navigate your changing library. So follow us today!

For more information, contact Kate Bright at 656-0695.

The New Year Brings New Electronic Resources to Dana

Happy New Year from Dana Medical Library! Hopefully you all had an enjoyable holiday and are ready to tackle the new year. The library has a couple of belated presents for you in the form of two new electronic resources.

LWW Health Library
LWW Health Library includes materials in a wide variety of formats including ebooks, videos, cases, self-assessments and more. Some of the key titles included are Grant’s Atlas of Anatomy and Bates’ Guide to Physical Examination and History Taking. You can find this collection by going to the library home page: click on Articles and Databases, scroll to E-Books and E-Texts section, and click on LWW Health Library. Off-campus access is available by logging in with your UVM NetID and Password.

BrowZine
BrowZine is a program that allows you to browse, read, and monitor journals that are available from Dana Medical Library. You can also create bookshelves for fast and easy access to key titles.
The easiest way to use BrowZine is to get the app on your mobile device and use it on the go. Follow the instructions on how install or email Gary Atwood at gatwood@uvm.edu for a printed copy. There is also a web browser version of BrowZine.

New/Updated E-books
We now have a number of new e-books and a handful of titles that have been recently updated. The complete list is now available. Also, search for titles directly by using the CatQuest search box in the upper right hand side of the library homepage.

If you have problems locating or accessing an e-book, please contact Gary Atwood for assistance.

Document Delivery: Your Go-To Resource for Article and Book Chapter Retrieval

Now that the print journals and most books have moved off site, it can be a challenge to locate the journal article or chapter that you need. The Dana staff are available to find it for you and send it to you. On weekdays, our Document Delivery office will usually have what you need within 24 hours of your request. Click Document Delivery under ‘Services’ on the website to start your request.

How to get started
Requests are made by filling out the online form, sending an email, phoning (802) 656-4382 or sending a fax to (802) 656-0762. Normal turnaround time is 24 hours. Large requests, inaccurate or incomplete citations may result in the request taking longer. Rush delivery is available with time permitting. Articles may be delivered to you via e-mail, campus mail, fax, or you can ask to be notified to pick them up in print at the library.

Document Delivery Specifics
Document Delivery (Electronic Article Delivery) is a service that locates, scans and emails articles and book chapters from Dana Medical Library’s book and journal collections, both print and electronic.

If you need a chapter from a print textbook that is currently located in off-site storage (e.i. at the LRA or Williston Annex, as indicated in our catalog), you don’t have to wait for the book to be sent here so that you can photocopy/scan the chapter you want. Let us do the work for you! Simply fill out the online Document Delivery request form, and we’ll make sure you get a PDF of the chapter(s) you need sent directly to your email.

Document Delivery is free to UVM health, biomedical, and medical students, and to University of Vermont Medical Center Residents and Fellows for articles requested from our print and electronic collections.

Dana’s Document Delivery department charges $5.00 per article/chapter requested from our electronic collection to UVM faculty and staff, and to University of Vermont Medical Center employees. This fee is waived for 5 requests per month. For requests of more than 5 articles per month, Dana will charge for ALL articles requested in that month.

Who can request Document Delivery? Anyone affiliated with UVM or the University of Vermont Medical Center can use Document Delivery. Others can contact us for specifics. Contact us with any questions or suggestions at 656-4382.

Hear what our patrons are saying about Document Delivery:
“The DD/ILL does an excellent job sleuthing hard-to-find documents, with a short turnaround time. My expectations are high … DD/ILL meets my research needs”
– John McPartland, Family Medicine

“I have been involved in several intensive research projects that require obtaining a large number of articles from the peer reviewed literature. Those that I can’t obtain myself through membership organizations … I request through the Dana Document Delivery/Interlibrary Loan Department. They offer a very rapid turn around and have yet to not fill one of my many requests – even for articles in very obscure journals! I could not do my work adequately without their help.”
– John Searles, Vermont Department of Health, Health Research Affiliate

Dana’s E-book Collection Has Grown!

The Dana Medical Library has been purchasing e-books for several years, both in collections such as Access Medicine, Clinical Key, and Ovid, and individually. Many titles have unlimited simultaneous users, while a few have single-user licenses.  All e-books are found in CatQuest by conducting a search by title. As shown with the following graph, Dana’s e-book collection has increased dramatically in the last few years due to these purchases:

E-books have the advantage of being available 24X7, take up no space in the library, and many have features like downloading to personal tablets and phones. In the last twelve months, over 40, 000 total “views” were logged in various e-books! The following table shows Dana’s top 15 most-accessed e-books:

For more information, Contact Dana Librarian Jeanene Light, MLS, Head of Collections Development, at 656-0521.

UVM Libraries’ CATQuest: Your Print and Electronic Resources Discovery Tool

The library catalog CATQuest makes it easy to find resources while Dana’s book collection is off-site. Whether you are looking for a print book, a chapter from a book, an e-book, or a journal article, CATQuest is the first step to getting what you need.

For books and journals that are stored off-site, we retrieve, scan and send copies of articles and book chapters from our print collection. If you need the entire book, request it through CATQuest and pick it up at the library. Look for the “Request from Annex” button in CATQuest. Over 6,000 print books were checked out from Dana in 2015-2016.

There are over 2,000 electronic books in medical, nursing, and heath professional topics in the CATQuest database. UVM students, staff and faculty and UVM Medical Center employees can access the online collections from anywhere, anytime, no need to request.

Even though there are no book shelves in the library, you can still browse! CATQuest has a special feature that allows you to browse electronically. Click on the ‘Virtual Browse’ tab, when searching the Library Catalog in CATQuest, to see other titles in the same call number range.

Where to look for “Virtual Browse”: Go to the Dana Webpage, click on CATQuest in the top toolbar, type in your subject heading and click on “Virtual Browse”.

So whatever you are looking for, start with CATQuest. For additional help, please contact the Main Desk by phone at 656-2200, email, or in person.

Improved Access to Medical Journals?

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The Dana Medical Library is trialing the new interface BrowZine for accessing e-journals. If you’re planning to read any journals online over the next couple of weeks, please give BrowZine a try and let us know what you think!

Connect to BrowZine to use it in a web browser. Also, create an account and download the app from the Apple App Store, Google Play Store or Amazon App Store. With BrowZine, you can:

  • Browse and read journals: Browse by subject, review tables of contents, and link to and download full articles.
  • Stay Current with My Bookshelf: Create a personal bookshelf of titles to follow and receive new article notifications.
  • Access on any device: Access BrowZine from your iOS and Android device and on the web to stay up to date wherever you are. It was originally developed for mobile devices, so it works really well on them.
  • Save and export articles: Use the BrowZine app to save articles for off-line reading or export to services such as DropBox, Mendeley, RefWorks, EndNote, Zotero, Papers and more.

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Your feedback could include responses to these questions:
Did you try the desktop or mobile version, or both?
How straightforward is it to access journals in your field currently and would BrowZine make a difference?
Did BrowZine allow you to do anything new and useful?
What are the drawbacks of BrowZine?

Other feedback would also be welcome. We’d like to make a decision about purchasing this product in the next two weeks, so responses before December 20 would be most welcome. Questions about this trial? Contact Donna O’Malley at 656-4415.