Ask a Librarian

Threre are lots of ways to contact a librarian. Choose what works best for you.

HOURS TODAY

Closed

Reference Desk

CONTACT US BY PHONE

(802) 656-2022

Voice

(802) 503-1703

Text

MAKE AN APPOINTMENT OR EMAIL A QUESTION

Schedule an Appointment

Meet with a librarian or subject specialist for in-depth help.

Email a Librarian

Submit a question for reply by e-mail.

WANT TO TALK TO SOMEONE RIGHT AWAY?

Library Hours for Sunday, November 19th

All of the hours for today can be found below. We look forward to seeing you in the library.
HOURS TODAY
Closed
MAIN LIBRARY

SEE ALL LIBRARY HOURS
WITHIN BAILEY/HOWE

MapsClosed

Media ServicesClosed

Reference DeskClosed

Cyber Cafe (All Night Study)Closed

OTHER DEPARTMENTS

Special CollectionsClosed

Dana Medical Library9:00 am - 11:00 pm

Classroom Technology ServicesClosed

 

CATQuest

Search the UVM Libraries' collections

UVM Theses and Dissertations

Browse by Department
Format:
Online
Author:
Sedeyn, Chelsea
Dept./Program:
Communication Sciences and Disorders
Year:
2017
Degree:
MS
Abstract:
ABSTRACT Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is often accompanied by atypical attention to faces. Some previous studies have suggested that children with ASD demonstrate strengths when processing visual information from cartoons, whereas others have argued that photographic stimuli confer benefits. No previous studies have compared photograph and cartoon images of faces (i.e., Boardmaker [BM] images) in the context of a Social Story™ (Gray, 2010): a common intervention to support behavior and social cognition in children with ASD. In this study, we examined visual attention to static face stimuli in the context of Social Stories™. Participants were 19 typically developing (TD) children and 18 age-matched children with ASD. We addressed two questions: 1) Is there a difference between TD children and children with ASD in how they attend to cartoon and photographic stimuli in the context of a Social Story™? and 2) Do group differences in visual attention to BM and/or photographic stimuli correlate with age and indices of autism severity, executive function, intellectual functioning, and weak central coherence? With regard to question 1 and with one exception, we found no differences between groups when viewing images of faces. The exception involved our cartoon and photograph images that differed in content from the other face images in that they represented a person’s full body as well as a range of objects (i.e., it was a more complex scene). For these images an interaction was observed such that the TD and ASD groups were no different in their looking patterns in the BoardMaker condition but they were different in the photograph condition. More specifically, we found that a shift toward more mouth-looking in the photograph condition among children with ASD was negatively associated with attention shifting and verbal IQ and that a shift toward more ‘other’-looking (i.e., looking that occurred outside the eye and mouth region of the face) was negatively associated with attention shifting, age, and central coherence. These findings suggest that children with ASD demonstrate typical visual attention patterns to both cartoon and photographic stimuli representing faces but that children with ASD employ an atypical scanning strategy when presented with photographic stimuli representing more complex social scenes. The theoretical and clinical implications of the findings are discussed.